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LINCOLN PUBLIC UBRARYM/ 



3 4864 00181 4788 



LINCOLN 1996 





COVER: Something old, something new 

As we move towards the next century, it became self-evident that our Public Safety Building (top 
photo), constructed in 1958, needed substantial modernization to keep up with current codes 
and technology. The renovations and additions (shown in the model photo at the bottom) will 
achieve our current needs, while preserving within the new complex usable portions of the old 
structure. We wish to thank the Public Safety Building Committee and al! Town boards and 
citizens of Lincoln for their support and help in the design process. 



REPORT 



of the 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



of the 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE YEAR 1996 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



TOWN CALENDAR 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 1 

Officers and Committees 4 

Town Clerk 18 

FINANCE 

Town Treasurer 47 

Town Accountant 50 

Board of Assessors 57 

Collector of Taxes 60 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire & Police Departments 62 

Public Safety Building Committee 66 

Inspectors of Building, Wiring and Plumbing 67 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 68 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 69 

Council on Aging 73 

Minuteman Home Care 76 

Dog Officer 77 

North East Solid Waste Committee 78 

Recycling Committee 79 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 80 

Board of Appeals 82 

CapitarPlanning Committee 84 

Conservation Commission 86 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 90 

Housing Commission 93 

Water Commissioners 94 

Public Works 97 

Traffic Committee 98 

Pierce Property Committee 100 

Cemetery Commissioners 101 

Lincoln Historic District Commission 102 

Bemis Hall Advisory Committee 103 

Codman Community Farms 104 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 109 

Lincoln Personnel Board 111 



LIBRARY, RECREATION AND SCHOOLS 

Lincoln Public Library 1 1 2 

Lincoln Cultural Council 120 

Recreation Committee 121 

Celebrations Committee 122 

Bemis Lecture Series 124 

Lincoln School Department 125 

School Building Committee 133 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School Committee 134 

Lincoln-Scholarship Committee 146 

Lincoln Sudbury Regional Scholarship Fund Committee 147 

Minuteman Science-Technology High School 150 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 155 

Commissioner of Trust Funds 1 60 

Valuation List 1 78 



TOWN CALENDAR 



SELECTMEN 



LINCOLN SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



LINCOLN SUDBURY REGIONAL 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

PLANNING BOARD 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

HOUSING COMMISSION 

OTHER COMMITTEES 
POPULATION 
TOWN AREA 
1997-98 TAX RATE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



Monday evenings, 7:30 p.m., 
Town Offices Building, 259-2600 

Generally held two Mondays per month; call the 
Superintendent's Office for dates and times, 259-9409 



Second and Fourth Tuesdays of the month, 7:30 p.m. 
High School Conference Room 

Second and Fourth Tuesdays of the month, 8:00 p.m. 
Town Offices Building, call 259-261 1 

First and Third Wednesdays of the month, 8:00 p.m. 
Town Offices Building, call 259-2610 

First and Third Wednesday of each month, 7:30 p.m. 
Town Offices Building, call 259-2612 

Second and Fourth Mondays of each month, 7:30 p.m. 
Town Offices Building, call 259-2613 

See bulletin board, Town Offices Building 

5,264 

14.56 square miles 

$12.53 

April 5, 1997 

(Saturday before last Monday in March, except when it 
falls on the Saturday before Easter Sunday, then it is 
held on the Saturday following Easter) 



ANNUAL ELECTION OF OFFICERS March 31 , 1 997 



QUALIFICATION FOR 
REGISTRATION 

REGISTERED VOTERS 

TOWN OFFICES 



Residence in the Town of Lincoln 

3,354 (as of December, 1996) 

Open Monday through Friday 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Closed Saturdays) 
Telephone - 259-2600 - Selectmen's Office 
- 259-2607 - Town Clerk's Office 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Rosamond P. Delori 
John S. Kerr, II 
Peter C. Sugar, Chair 

As we move forward into yet another year, let us reflect on our current status. It could be 
called "work in progress". Why so? 

Let us speak of 'progress' first. We are making progress, though it is never entirely 
perceptible. Change comes in increments and only by looking at a grouping of years can we 
note that change has indeed occurred from start to finish. In our town, progress can be 
represented by the way we have managed to overcome recent differences of opinion, which were 
threatening at one time to tear us apart. Following the Task Force report on Town Governance 
of 1994, we have been actively engaged in implementation of its proposals and other work. 

We held a very successful and well attended 'Spring Board 1996', a meeting of town 
leaders, to examine governing procedures in bringing issues forth, and conducting our affairs in 
an open, respectful and, most importantly, lawful manner. 

We have also helped the Moderator's meetings gather representatives of all our boards 
and committees in one place-to look more closely at actual and current problems we are facing, 
again with the purpose of ensuring that all parties who have input on any given topic can and will 
be a part of the resolution. Topics we have looked at include low and moderate income housing, 
the Codman Community Farm and the location of the Post Office. All of these issues are 
ongoing, but the continuing dialog is the key. 

We are also beginning to come to closure on overhauling and replacing our outdated 
facilities. The renovation and reconstruction of Smith and Brooks Schools was completed this 
year, symbolically celebrated by the 'butterfly' weathervane atop the belltower, the design of one 
of our students, its linkage to the past assured by the old bell within the tower. 

The new Public Safety Building is going into construction — though not before we held 
several public outreach meetings and a Special Town Meeting last December to reaffirm the 
appropriateness of the design and its budget. We are also looking at the Public Safety 
equipment: at our police cruisers, fire engines and ambulance. Our public safety staff is ably led 
by Chief Allen Bowles, and we have recently promoted Captain Goddard to the position of 
Deputy Fire Chief. 

We are conducting a survey of our infrastructure in the context of a long-term 
maintenance plan. Some of our drainage systems and structures are in need of repair and we 
are taking steps to study the immediate and long range implications. We have also sought 
engineering help to develop a roadway maintenance and pavement management program. 
Similarly we are considering all our town facilities from a single maintenance perspective. 

Let us emphasize that, like our own homes, we cannot afford to allow our properties to 
decline by inadequate maintenance; also to be added is the need to keep abreast of current 
thinking and practice. We should not be shy in declaring that, through the years, Lincoln as a 






community has always been in the forefront with its search for, and putting into practice of, new 
ideas. 

There are further challenges: traffic is one: it proceeds inexorably through our town, 
disrupting our lives and making it difficult at times for our own citizens to move about. There is no 
short term solution; our Traffic Committee is working diligently with our police to devise ways to 
meet the challenge; we have allocated special funds for speed and traffic regulation enforcement, 
though we must recognize that some of the solutions lie outside our total control. Only by 
working with the surrounding communities in the greater metropolitan Boston area, which in our 
case are the towns in our immediate vicinity, will we be able, hopefully, to resolve this problem. 
We are a part of MAGIC (Minuteman Advisory Group on Interlocal Coordination, a sub-unit of the 
regional planning agency), and these problems are a subject of continuing discussions. 

Trash: we are a part of NESWC (North East Solid Waste Committee), though the 
agreement drawn up in 1985 has turned out to be highly disadvantageous to all the towns within 
the arrangement. We are soldiering on to make the best of a bad situation and come to the end 
of this particular chapter, started in all good conscience to ensure the quality of our environment. 

Housing: we continue to give support to our citizens in the residential developments at 
Lincoln Woods and Battle Road Farms, as they grapple with a host of financial and other 
problems. 

Staffing: several years ago we were forced to cut some of our staff to preserve our 
budgets. Efficiencies have been gained but we should acknowledge that we could not have 
succeeded without the collaboration of our staff. This collaboration continues — we are in the 
process of negotiating a new round of collective bargaining agreements with our unions, 
rewarding their hard work, while still controlling the overall increase in costs. This extends not 
only to the salary line items but also the restructuring of the employee health insurance. The 
employee groups worked with the town through a specially-appointed insurance committee in 
developing a cost-effective program which resulted in a $60-70,000 annual saving. We thank all 
our dedicated staff who are working with us in achieving our goals. 

Our Town Engineer, Frank Emmons, retired this year after a long service. Here again, 
rather than replacing him, we have developed an agreement with the Town of Concord to share 
the engineering services for a savings to us of $25,000. 

Computers are another key in saving labor costs and allowing the better use of 
our staff, while providing us with the tools to run the town's business in an efficient manner 
befitting our impending entry into the next century. Our upgrade of computer equipment is on 
target within a five-year development plan. 

Nor should we overlook our collaboration with the Finance Committee and 
School Committees in developing sound and fiscally responsible budgets and helping to keep the 
rising tax rates within reasonable bounds. We should also acknowledge the Moderator's recently 
appointed Capital Planning Committee, who are looking ahead several years to bring some order 
and thoughtful forecasting to major town expenditures. 

Then there is HATS — the Hanscom Area Towns Study-to keep an eye on the Hanscom 
Airfield and Massport. Massport is continuing its efforts to develop the airfield for general aviation 
and would seriously impact our suburbia but for our continued vigilance and active cooperative 
work with the other three towns: Lexington, Concord and Bedford, to bring maximum pressure 



on Massport for some reasonable compromise. It is good to report that all our local 
representatives are "on board", now augmented by Lincoln's recently-elected Susan Fargo to the 
State Senate (replacing Cile Hicks, who has been so helpful to us in the past). 

We are facing other issues, along Route 2, currently at Crosby's Corner, where the 
intended flyover could be a serious disruption to our citizens on both sides of the road. We 
achieved some wonderful collaboration among our residents and have succeeded in having the 
effort recognized by the Massachusetts Highway Department, as it works towards the final 
design of the intersection. Let us again emphasize the communal nature of this effort, within the 
auspices of CAC (Corridor Advisory Committee), working together with our neighbors in Concord 
and Acton. 

Somewhat peripherally, but no less importantly, is the newly planned bicycle path along 
Bedford Road, north of Route 2, involving a crossing of Route 2 with the consequent and 
necessary reworking of the traffic light 'intervals'. 

Another bicycle path, along Route 117, west of Route 126, is also in the development 
stages. It would be appropriate here to mention the Minuteman National Historical Park, where a 
new pathway has been dedicated during the past year. 

Let us now address 'work'. It will be clear that all the progress we have made could not 
have been accomplished without work: work by our citizen volunteers and our town staff and 
employees. The effort is considerable and arduous. We are fortunate in having an excellent 
corps of staff and employees, led by our very able Executive Secretary, Police and Fire Chief, 
Public Works Director and many others. This effort is augmented by the numerous volunteers of 
our town who give so generously of their time for the benefit of our community, to whom we must 
be forever grateful. 

Which brings us to what makes Lincoln so special. We are, to continue to emphasize 
this, a community with a strong rural and agricultural history and ties to the very beginnings of our 
country, a community which has moved into the twentieth century and now contains a large 
contingent of professional residents. This has resulted in a unique mix of people: young and old, 
farming and business, artistic, creative, socially conscious but, above all, supportive and 
neighborly. It is this mix which we must protect: how we do this will finally determine whether we 
survive as a community as we have come to know and love it. 

It is only by working together and involving as many of us, as we are able (the 'Lincoln 
Way'), that we can succeed. Failing to recognize and confront the many challenges on a daily 
basis can only magnify these problems in the long term. We thank you for your support and help 
in our work and urge your continuing involvement with our heartfelt appreciation. 



John B. French 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



MODERATOR 



TOWN CLERK 



Term Expires 
1999 



Nancy J. Zuelke 



Rosamond Delori 

John S. Kerr, II 

Peter C. Sugar, Chairman 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Roy M. Raja 



L. Bruce Long, Chairman 
Paul Marsh 
William B. Stason 



TOWN TREASURER 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Roy M. Raja 



Stephen Johnson 
Patricia M. Mostue 
Terry Perlmutter 
Patrick Phillipps, Chairman 
Patricia Salem 



Ellin Fuller 

Andrew Hall, Chairman 

Margaret B. Marsh 



Magruder C. Donaldson, Chairman 
Diane Haessler 
Frederick L. Mansfield 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



1997 



1998 
1999 
1997 



1997 



1999 
1998 
1997 



1998 



1998 
1999 
1997 
1999 
1998 



1997 
1998 
1999 



1998 
1997 
1999 



Term Expires 
REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Donna K.Coutu 1998 

William C. Hewins 1997 

Sarah Cannon Holden 1997 

Janet Miller 1999 

Stephen Silverman 1999 

David Wilson 1998 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Martha DeNormandie 1998 

Natalie Faddoul 1999 

Ann B. Janes, Chairman 1 997 

PLANNING BOARD 

Crawley Cooper 1997 

Margery P. Faran 2000 

Alex MacLean (appointed) 1997 

Dilla G. Tingley 1999 

James B. White, Chairman 2001 

MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 

Giles Browne 1997 

FENCE VIEWER 

Henry Morgan 1997 

Perry Culver 1997 

COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Stephen Gray 1998 

Conrad Todd 1997 

1996 

TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 

Dan P. Dimancescu 1 999 

Sara Mattes 1997 

Adeline Naiman (Resigned) 1998 

Debra Weisgall (Appointed) 1 997 



Term Expires 
TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 

Emily Althausen Self-Perpetuating 

Craig Hill, Chairman 

Joseph Sussman 

Linda May (Elected by Town) 1 998 

Ann Rote (School Committee's Appointee) 1997 

Bruce Bare (Selectmen's Appointee) 1999 

DECORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
"A" TRUSTEES 

Joseph L. Bower 2000 

Jonathan Cohen 1997 

Robert C. Frank 1999 

Heather D. Hill 1998 

"B" TRUSTEES 

Laurie Dewey (Selectmen's Appointee) 1999 

Phyllis Rappaport (School Committee's Appointee) 1998 

Barbara Sisson (Library Trustee's Appointee) 1 997 

HOUSING COMMISSION 

Joan Considine (Appointed by the State) 1998 

Daniel Ladd (Selectmen's Appointee) 2000 

Sara Mattes (Appointed) 1997 

Katharine Preston, Chairman 1998 

Betty-Jane Scheff 1997 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

John Adams, Chairman (Elected Post) 1998 

Donna Johnson (Elected Post) 1999 

Janet Maloney (Elected Post) 1 997 

Jane Tatlock (Selectmen's Appointee) 1 999 

Anne Crosby (Selectmen's Appointee) (Resigned) 1997 

Sandra Storer (Selectmen's Appointee) 1 998 



Timothy S. Higgins 



Suzanne C. Marchand 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT/FINANCE DIRECTOR 



ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
Blythe C. Robinson 

TOWN COUNSEL 



David Dinwoodey 
Thomas Arnold 



Vincent DeAmicis 



Patrick Allen 



Julia Miller 



Allen Bowles 



Charles E. Doyle 



David Davis 



Kevin Mooney 



Term Expires 
1997 

1997 

1997 



1997 
1997 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER DEPARTMENT 



PRINCIPAL ASSESSOR 



CHIEF OF POLICE 



DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE-PROSECUTOR 



POLICE SERGEANT 



INSPECTOR 



1997 



1997 



1997 



1997 



1997 



1997 



1997 



POLICE OFFICERS 



Randy Azzato 
Robert Gallo 
Richard J. Hallett 
Andrew Kennedy 
Gerald Mahoney 
Richard McCarty 
Thomas Moran 



Allen Bowles 
Charles E. Doyle 
Robert Paul Millian 
Barbara A. Hartnett 



Allen Bowles 



Kenneth Bassett 



Earl Midgley 



Earl Midgley 



Kenneth Desmond 



Russell J. Dixon 



CONSTABLES 



Term Expires 



1997 
1997 
1997 
1997 
1997 
1997 
1997 



1997 
1997 
1997 
1997 



FIRE CHIEF 



TREE WARDEN 
LOCAL SUPT. OF SHADE TREE MANAGEMENT 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



WIRING INSPECTOR 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



1997 



1997 



1997 



1997 



1997 



1997 



DIRECTOR OF DEFENSE & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 
Thomas B. Moran 1 997 

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 
Curtis A. Risley 1997 



F. John Solman 



Richard Goddard 



Conrad Todd 



Conrad Todd 



Margaret M. Martin 



Peggy Elliott 
Marshall Sandock 
Jacqueline Snelling 
Nancy J. Zuelke, Ex officio 



ASSISTANT COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COORDINATOR 



VETERANS' AGENT 



VETERANS' GRAVE OFFICER 



TOWN HISTORIAN 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 



Term Expires 
1997 

1997 

1997 

1997 



Wendy Palu 



MINUTEMAN HOME CARE 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Roger Bergen 

Jonathan Donaldson, Chairman 

Douglas Harding 

Addie Kim 

Tara Tracy 

Thomas Walker 



1997 



1998 
1997 
1999 



1998 



1998 
1997 
1998 
1997 
1999 
1999 



Term Expires 
COUNCIL ON AGING 

Albert Avery 1 997 

Marian Cook 1 997 

John Caswell 1 999 

Marie Gavin 1 998 

Allan Greaves 1998 

Barbara Grim 1997 

Russell Mahan, Secretary/Treasurer 1998 

RuthMorey 1997 

Marilyn O'Rourke 1999 

Julie Pugh 1998 

Wendy Palu-Kusik 1998 

JaneTatlock 1999 

LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Elizabeth Donaldson (At Large) 1 998 

Eleanor Fitzgerald (Realtor) 1 998 

Kenneth Hurd (Architect) 1999 

Colin Smith, Chairman (District) 1997 

Mary Spindler (Society) 1 999 

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Elizabeth Donaldson (At Large) 1998 

Eleanor Fitzgerald (Realtor) 1 998 

Kenneth Hurd (Architect) 1999 

Colin Smith, Chairman (District) 1997 

Mary Spindler (Society) 1 999 

James White (Planning Bd.) 1 997 

Alex MacLean (Planning Bd.) 1998 

Abigail Congdon, Alternate (District) 1999 

.Alternate 1994 

PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Judy Gross 1996 

Jean Y. Home 1999 

Ray A. Levy 1999 

Lucia MacMahon 1999 

William Shea, Chairman 1998 



10 



Term Expires 
LINCOLN CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Diane Braun 1 997 

Marcia Ciaramaglia 1998 

Suze Craig, Co-Chair 1998 

Judy Hall 1997 

Sheryl Heller 1998 

Ingrid Neri 1998 

Clive Russ 1997 

Barbara Stecher 1 998 

Margie J. Topf 1997 

Sheila Williams, Co-Chair 1997 

REPRESENTATIVES TO HANSCOM FIELD ADVISORY COMMISSION 

James Hogan, "At Large" Representative 1997 

Elliott Curtis, Alternate 1 998 

REPRESENTATIVES TO HANSCOM AREA STUDY COMMITTEE (HATS)II 

Robert DeNormandie, Selectmen's Appointee 
Terrence Fenton, Member at Large 
Palmer Faran, Planning Board Appointee 
James Hogan, At Large (AFAC Rep.) 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 



Harriet B. Todd, Alternate 1 996 

REPRESENTATIVE TO METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL (MAPC) 

William Constable 1997 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MIDDLESEX COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 

Harriet B. Todd 1996 

REPRESENTATIVE TO NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE 

Russel Hansen 1997 

, Alternate 1 996 

REPRESENTATIVES TO CAMBRIDGE WATERSHED ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Harriet B. Todd (Selectmen) 1996 

Crawley Cooper (Planning Board) 1 997 

Addie Kim (Conservation Commission) 1997 



11 



Term Expires 
BOARD OF APPEALS 

Despena Billings 2001 

Morton Braun, Chairman 1998 

Buckner M. Creel 2000 

Peter H. Guldberg 1999 

Amalie Kass 1 997 

Pamela Green, Associate Member 2000 

Susan Hall Mygatt, Associate, Member 1 998 

CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Neil Feinberg, Co-Chairman 1998 

Bruce Hoar, Co-Chairman 1996 

HemaJairam 1996 

Kathy Madison 1 996 



ROUTE 128 AREA COMMITTEE 



Susan Carr 

Terry Fenton 

Earl Flansburgh 

John Hammond 

Ann F. Ries, Chairman 

David Ries 



BEMIS HALL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Barbara Beal (Representative of Friends of the Library) 
Elaine Bloom (Council on Aging Coordinator) 
Debra Haiduven (Recreation Director) 
John Manzelli (Representative of First Parish Church) 

(Representative of Lincoln Players) 
Natalie Faddoul (Representative of the Lincoln Grange) 
Blythe Robinson, Ex officio 



WATER MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 



Pat Allen 
Ellin Fuller 
Andrew Hall 
Margaret B. Marsh 



John H. L. Bingham 
Dorothy Brennan 
Wesley Frost 
Hugo Liepmann 
Gwyn Loud 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 



12 



Term Expires 
THE MATADEPERA COMMITTEE 



Ann Parke 
Margaret-Ann Rice 
Susan Seeley 
Elizabeth Smith 



PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING COMMITTEE 



Kenneth Bassett 

Chief Allen Bowles 

Timothy Higgins 

Hugo Liepmann 

Neil Middleton 

Earl D. Midgley 

Morris Levy 

Joseph Robbat, Jr., Chairman 

David Whalen 



Leo Algeo 

John Barbetti 

Gary Bardsley 

Raymond Barnes 

Dennis A. Botelho 

David Brown 

Steven G. Carter 

Joseph Cavanaugh 

John Ciraso 

Robert Collina 

Arthur Cotoni 

Brian Cotoni 

Joseph Cotoni, Sr. 

Peter Dewey 

Frank Domenichella 

Joseph Driscoll 

Neil Duane 

Gregory Fall 

John Finnerty 

Shirley Foley 

Richard Goddard 

Frank Gordon, Jr. 

Frank Gordon, Sr. 

Ann Harrer (Conservation) 

Donald Hodgson 

Delia Hoye 

James Kane 

Herbert Kelley, Jr. 

Jane Layton (Conservation) 

Steven Lennon 

Paul Lund 



SPECIAL POLICE 



13 



SPECIAL POLICE CONTINUED 



Term Expires 



Geoffrey McGean (Conservation) 

Mary Mcintosh (Conservation) 

Earl Midgley (Building Inspector) 

Colin Moriarty 

Robert Morrison 

William Morrison 

Michael Murphy 

Carol Padden (Conservation) 

Theodore Poulos 

Kenneth Rivers 

Timothy Robbins 

Richard Russes 

Thomas C. Spencer 

Bradford Stowe 

Ronald Tolwinski 

Richard Turcotte 

Walter Van Wart 

John Whalen 

William Whalen, Jr. 

Eric Williams 



Jane Barnet 
Nancy Ritchie 



Donna A. Madden 



Charles Doyle 
Donna A. Madden 



Nancy J. Zuelke 



Jane Barnet 



APPOINTED BY THE TOWN CLERK 
ASSISTANT TOWN CLERK 

APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 
ASSISTANT TREASURER 

APPOINTED BY THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES 
DEPUTY COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 
BURIAL AGENT 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



1997 
1997 



1997 



1996 
1997 



1997 



1997 



14 



Term Expires 
APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Thomas Black 1 998 

Georgine Herschbach 1 998 

Jacquelyn Lenth 1999 

Marcia A. Roehr 1999 

Alvin Schmertzler 1999 

Gary Taylor, Chairman 1 997 

Peter Watkinson 1997 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

Elliot Curtis 1997 

Kathryn Nicholson 1 998 

Ann Sutherland Ries, Chairman 1 999 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MINUTEMAN SCIENCE-TECHNOLOGY 
HIGH SCHOOL 

Sarah Bobbitt 1998 

TAX EQUITY STUDY COMMITTEE 

Joanna Hopkins 

Robert Lincoln 

Emanuel Maier 

Kemon Taschioglou, Chairman 

CAPITAL PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Mary Cancian (At Large) 

Douglas Harding (Conservation Commission Representative) 

Patti Salem (School Committee Representative) 

Alvin Schmertzler (Finance Committee Representative) 

Edward Schwartz (At Large) 

Peter Sugar (Selectmen Representative) 

Joseph Sussman (Library Trustee Representative) 

Timothy Higgins (Ex officio 

Suzanne Marchand (Ex officio) 

APPOINTED BY THE PLANNING BOARD 

ROADSIDE PATH COMMITTEE 

Sonja Johansson 
Mark Naiman 



15 



Term Expires 
APPOINTED BY THE PLANNING BOARD & THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TRAFFIC COMMITTEE 



Marilyn Brandt 
John Caswell 
Eleanor Fitzgerald 
Michael Frazier 
John Tylko 
Jane L. Ward 
Robert G. Wolf 



1997 
1998 
1998 
1997 
1997 
1998 
1997 



APPOINTED BY CONSERVATION COMMISSION & 
LINCOLN LAND TRUST 



WILDLIFE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Cathleen Calmer 

Steven Ells 

Susan Klem 

Jane Layton 

Gwyneth Loud, Co-chairman 

Geoffrey McGean, Co-chairman 

James Meadors 

Ellen Meadors 

Cynthia Moller 

Simon Perkins 

Mary Rosenfeld 



APPOINTED BY VARIOUS BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 



James Birmingham (Moderator's Appointee) 
Michaela Lipsey (Selectmen's Appointee) 
Linda Pejchar (School Committee's Appointee) 



1997 
1998 
1999 



SCHOOL BUILDINGS COMMITTEE 



Douglas Adams 
Kenneth Bergen 
Esther Braun 
Susy rati Bunanta 
Crawley Cooper 
Priscilla Damon 
Mark Deck 
Rita DiGiovanni 
Earl Flansburgh 
George Georges 
Priscilla Kern 
Robert Lemire 



Sara Mattes 
Henry Morgan 
Patricia Salem, Chairman 
William Stason 
Laurence Zuelke 



16 



BUNSAI-GAKUEN PROPERTIES 
SPECIAL OFFICERS 

John Brophy 
Robert A. Carter 
Michael Hailson 
Alice Harkins 
Anthony Lagos 
Alfred Lanoue 
Paul Liss 
Antonio Lopez 
Daniel J. Moore 
Paul Rose 

OTHER SPECIAL OFFICERS 

Matrons: Emily Hicks, Wendy Sullivan 

Minuteman Tech High School Properties Only: Dennis Deeb and Randall Fox 

Audubon/Drumlin Properties Only: David Hill and Daniel Hart 

Cambridge Water Dept. Properties: Henry Manuel 

Details: Roland Anderson, Ronald Benotti, Thomas Healy, Walter Nelson, Robert Parker 



17 



TOWN CLERK 

Nancy J. Zuelke 

The Town Clerk is the official recorder of town events and activities and issues licenses 
and certificates. The duties include recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections, 
and notifying the Selectmen and other officers concerned with appropriations which have been 
voted. 

As chief election official the Town Clerk oversees the preparation of all elections, 
administers campaign finance laws, certifies nomination papers and initiative petitions, and 
prepares the official election results for the Secretary of State. The Clerk supervises voter 
registrations, conducts the annual town census, prepares the street list, voters list, school list, 
and furnishes the jury list to the Office of the Jury Commissioner. 

In 1996 the Town purchased a new ballot box and optical scanning voting system. This 
replaced the punch card voting system the town had used since 1976. The optical scanning 
system was used for the September State Primary and the November State Election and was 
found to be a great benefit in counting ballots. 

Presidential Primary 
March 5, 1996 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open at 7:00 a.m. by Nancy 
J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assisted throughout the day by the following wardens: Tom 
Coan, Peggy Elliott, Marshall Sandock, and Larry Zuelke. The Polls were declared closed at 
8:00 p.m. by Mrs. Zuelke. The total number of votes cast was 747, which was divided as 
follows: Precinct 1A (Congressional District 7): Republican - 549, Democratic 178, Libertarian - 
0, for a total of 565; Precinct 1B (Congressional District 5): Republican - 16, Democratic - 4, 
Libertarian - 0, for a total of 20. 





Republican 






Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1A 


Prec. 2B 


Total 


Presidential 


Richard G. Lugar 


36 


2 


38 


Preference 


Morry Taylor 


1 





1 




Phil Gramm 


1 





1 




Patrick J. Buchanan 


54 


1 


55 




Bob Dole 


267 


10 


277 




Steve Forbes 


93 


2 


95 




Lamar Alexander 


45 





45 




Alan Keyes 


6 





6 




Robert K. Dornan 













No Preference 


3 





3 




Scattering 


2 





2 




Blanks 


41 


1 


42 






549 


16 


565 



18 



Office 



Candidate 



Prec. 1A 



Prec. 2B 



Total 



State Committee 


David P. Railsback 


143 


6 


149 


Man 


Tom Valle 


226 


7 


233 




Blanks 


180 


3 


183 






549 


16 


565 


State Committee 


Martha Bradley-Roche 


299 


12 


311 


Woman 


Judy L. Cypret 


24 





24 




Margaret A. Fudge 


48 


1 


49 




Blanks 


178 


3 


181 






549 


16 


565 


Town Committee 


Robert J. Kelleher 
Margaret A. Spaeth 
Nancy C. Thomas 
Elizabeth Kimnach 
Donna G. Burt 
Elizabeth J. Peavy 
Eleanor M. Gallitano 
Patricia D. Gray 
Stephen V. Gray 
Lawrence W. Whitman 
John L. Armstrong 
William B. Russell 
J. Frank Lane 
John R. Caswell 
Margaret G. Puffer 
Guido R. Perera, Jr. 
James G. Birmingham 
Marian M. Cook 
Arthur M. Dunlap 
Thomas M. Heller 
Ann CZ. Heller 
Mariano Meeks 
Andrew C. Pickett 
John A. Quelch 
Amy Ullman 
Jon Barry 
Blanks 






6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
4 
6 
6 
6 
4 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
2 
13977 
14125 




Democratic 






Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1A 


Prec. 2B 


Total 



Presidential 
Preference 



Bill Clinton 

Lyndon H. LaRouche 

No Preference 

Scattering 

Blanks 



149 

2 

3 

1 

23 

178 



19 



152 

2 

3 

2 

23 

182 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1A 


Prec. 2B 


Total 


State Committee 


Thomas J. Larkin 


138 


2 


140 


Man 


Blanks 


40 


2 


42 






178 


4 


182 


State Committee 


Virginia M. Allan 


86 


1 


87 


Woman 


Susan R. Burstein 


24 


1 


25 




Carol Y. Mitchell 


30 





30 




Blanks 


38 


2 


40 






178 


4 


182 


Town Committee 


Louise K. DeBaryshe 
Marshall Sandock 
Henry M. Morgan 
Geraldine Lattimore 
Carolyn Birmingham 
Mark Naiman 
Emanuel Maier 
Sylvia Maier 
Wesley T. Frost 
Peggy P. Elliott 
W. Robert Pearmain 
Claire P. Pearmain 
Susan F. Brooks 
Ada A. Hayes 
Cynthia W. Ritsher 
Robert L. Loud 
Jean B. Palmer 
Gerald D. Palmer 
Kathryn J. Allott 
Laurie Dewey 
Albert England 
Priscilla England 
Susan Fargo 
John B. French 
Edward Lynch 
Hyacinth Loatman 
Mary Troy 
Eleanor Fitzgerald 
Edward Morgan 
Blanks 






17 

15 

13 

9 

6 

10 

11 

6 

14 

14 

11 

10 

7 

16 

8 

1 

14 

3 

2 

13 

6 

6 

10 

6 

8 

3 

10 

6 

1 

4130 

4386 



The total number of registered voters in Lincoln for this election was 3292. 



20 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 23, 1996 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called to order in the Donaldson 
Auditorium on March 23, 1996 by the Moderator, Mr. John B. French, at 9:45 a.m., and a 
quorum being present, (477 voters throughout the day) the following business was transacted: 



ARTICLE 2. To bring in their for any Committees, Commissioners, Trustees, and other officers 
required by law to votes be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That Gus Browne be elected Measurer of Wood and Bark and Henry Morgan and 
Perry Culver be elected Fence Viewer for the ensuing year. 



ARTICLE 3. 



VOTED: 



To hear and act upon the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, 

Commissioners and Trustees. 

(Unanimously) 

That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees, 

as printed in the Town Report, be accepted. 



ARTICLE 4: To fix the salaries and compensation of the several elective officers of the Town 
and to determine whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be 
authorized to employ for additional compensation any of its members and to fix 
additional compensation of such members. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the salaries of the elected officials of the Town for the fiscal year beginning 
July 1 , 1996, and ending June 30, 1997, be fixed at the following amounts: 



Town Clerk 

Treasurer and Collector 
Assessors, Chairman 
Assessors, other members, each 
Water Commissioners, each 



500.00 

10.00 

200.00 

175.00 

75.00 



and that the Board of Assessors is authorized to employ one of its members to 
work on assessing duties at a salary not to exceed $5,200., for the said fiscal 
period. 

ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and expedient purposes of the 
Town, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town adopt as separate appropriations the recommendations listed in 
the Financial Section and Warrant for the 1996 Annual Town Meeting, except for 
the following items where the appropriation has been amended from the Financial 
Section and Warrant: 

Item 30 Consulting & Engineering - Expense - Increase appropriation to 
$25,000.00 per a vote of the Board of Selectmen on March 18, 1996. 

Item 510 Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School - Reduce appropriation to 
$1,338,197.72 per a revised vote of the Regional School Committee 
on February 27, 1 996. 



21 



Item 51 1 Minuteman Science-Technology High School - Increase appropriation 
to $106,508.00 per a revised vote of the School Committee on March 
5, 1996. 

and that all items be raised by taxation except to the following extent and to the 
extent provided in a second motion to be made under this article: 

Item 15 Town Offices - Salaries - $60,000.00 to be taken from Water 
Department Receipts, and $71 ,000.00 to be taken from the Air Force 
School Account. 

Item 40 Conservation - Salaries - $5,635.00 to be taken from Conservation 
Commission Agency Account and $1,824.00 to be taken from the 
Wetlands Agency Account. 

Item 502 Elementary School - Instruction - $60,000.00 to be taken from Metco 
Funds. 

Item 504 Elementary School - Operation and Maintenance - $100.00 to be 
taken from the Grammar School Fund and $2,052.00 to be taken 
from the Julian DeCordova School Equipment Fund. 

Item 520 Library - Salaries - $1 ,965.00 to be taken from Dog Tax Receipts. 

Item 702 Cemetery - $5,000.00 to be taken from the Cemetery Improvement 
Fund and $700.00 to be taken from the Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Fund. 

Item 950-957 Water Department - $381,853.00 to be taken from Water 
Department Receipts. 

An amendment to line item 51 for the Board of Assessors' expenses to be increased by 
$1 ,000, a token amount, for 1996-1997 was defeated by a majority voice vote. 

An amendment to line item 301 , Custom Service to reduce the amount by $40,000 to 
buy a 91 inch mower was defeated by a majority voice vote. 

An amendment to line item 842, Interest on Public Safety Building construction loan to 
reduce the amount to was defeated by a majority voice vote. 

The Total for General Purposes for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1996, through June 
30, 1997, is shown as $15,002,462.26. After the application of the special funds as 
listed above, the amount to be raised is $14,412,333.26. 

At the conclusion of action on all money articles it was voted unanimously as follows (as 
a second motion under Article 5) 

VOTED: That the sum of $1 79,453.00 be taken from Free Cash to reduce the total 

amount to be raised by taxation, as voted under the first motion under this 
Article 5. 

(This second motion was TABLED following the first vote under Article 5 until action on 
Article 43 had been taken.) 






22 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to continue the Town's annual contract with the Secretary of Defense 
to operate the elementary school at Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, 
Massachusetts, contingent upon Lincoln being awarded the contract pursuant to 
the Department of Defense competitive bid process, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town authorizes the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to 
continue the Town's annual contract with the Secretary of Defense to operate the 
elementary school at Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts, 
contingent upon Lincoln being awarded the contract pursuant to the Department 
of Defense competitive bid process. 



ARTICLE 7. 



VOTED: 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be 
used for the construction, reconstruction, and/or maintenance and repair of roads 
and bridges, or take any other action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 

That the Town appropriate the sum of $217,133.00 from available funds under 
G.L. Chapter 90 pursuant to Chapter 85 of the Acts of 1994 to be used for the 
construction, reconstruction, and/or maintenance and repair of the Town's roads. 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, for the 
repair and maintenance of certain Town buildings, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $81 ,000.00 from free cash to be 
used for the repair and maintenance of certain Town and School buildings. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be 
used by the public safety departments for the purchase of an ambulance and 
related equipment, and to see if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale or 
otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $90,000.00 from free cash, to be 
used to purchase a replacement ambulance and related equipment for the public 
safety departments, and to authorize the Selectmen to dispose by sale or 
otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment. 

An amendment to specify a 4WD vehicle, encourage going to the most appropriate hospital, 
enlarge the area to include Mass General Hospital, make no charge in excess of that paid by 
insurance, meet Federal Specifications, and keep the old ambulance for back up and training 
was defeated by a majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be 
used by the public works department for the purchase of vehicles and/or 
equipment, and to see if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise 
of excess vehicles and equipment, or take any other action relative thereto. 



23 



VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $33,000.00 from free cash to be 
used to purchase a replacement four wheel drive pick-up truck and related 
equipment for the public works department, and to authorize the Selectmen to 
dispose by sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment. 

ARTICLE 1 1 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be 
used by the public safety departments for the purchase of vehicles and/or 
equipment, and to see if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise 
of excess vehicles and equipment, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $22,000.00 from free cash to be 
used to purchase a replacement police cruiser and related equipment for the 
public safety departments, and to authorize the Selectmen to dispose by sale or 
otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, for the 
purpose of providing a one-day Town-wide hazardous waste collection day, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $12,000.00 from free cash to be 
used to provide a one-day Town-wide hazardous waste collection day. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, for the 
purchase of new computer equipment for Town departments including hardware, 
software, installation, training, maintenance and other related costs, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $77,000.00 from free cash for the 
purchase of new computer equipment for Town departments including hardware, 
software, installation, training, maintenance and other related costs. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, for the 
design and renovation of the Council on Aging Offices at Bemis Hall, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $3,700.00 from free cash to be 
used to renovate the Council on Aging Offices at Bemis Hall. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to grant its consent to the settlement of a claim to 
which the Town, acting by and through its School Committee, is a party, and in 
connection therewith to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any 
combination thereof, said monies to be used to pay for all or a portion of such 
settlement; or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (By a Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to grant its consent to the settlement of a claim by a former 
school department employee to which the Town, acting by and through its School 
Committee, is a party in the amount of $99,000.00, and in connection therewith 
that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $64,000.00 from free cash and 



24 



$35,000.00 from insurance settlement proceeds, said monies to be used to pay 
for the amount of such settlement. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, distinct from 
that authorized under Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1996 Annual Town Meeting, 
to provide educational program enhancement consistent with the intent of the 
State Education Reform Act as determined by the School Committee, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (By a Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $190,005.00 from free cash, distinct 
from that authorized under Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1996 Annual Town 
Meeting, to provide educational program enhancement consistent with the intent 
of the State Education Reform Act as determined by the School Committee. 

An amendment that the Town recommend that such funds not be used for a curriculum 
development position was defeated by a majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, for the 
design, engineering, construction and/or reconstruction, and maintenance of the 
Town's playing fields, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (By a Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $135,000.00 from free cash for the 
design, engineering, construction and/or reconstruction, and maintenance of the 
Town's playing fields. 

An amendment to reduce to amount to $10,000.00 for an engineering study only was defeated 
by a majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the 
design and engineering of a new roadside path along Bedford Road between 
Route 2 and Route 2A, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $15,000.00 from free cash for the 
design and engineering of a new roadside path along Bedford Road between 
Route 2 and Route 2A. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the 
design, engineering, construction and/or maintenance of a roadside path on 
Route 117 from Route 126 to 106 South Great Road, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED: (By a Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $30,000.00 from free cash to be 
expended, first , for the design and engineering of a roadside path along Route 
117 from Route 126 to the Mount Misery parking lot. 

Article 1 9 and Article 20 were discussed together. 

An amendment to delete the second portion of the original motion which stated "and, second , to 
the extent any appropriated sums remain following completion of such design and engineering, 
for the construction of such roadside path beginning at the Route 126 intersection" was passed 
by a majority voice vote. 



25 



An amendment to reduce the funds to $15,000.00 was defeated by a majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or any combination thereof to 
extend the current roadside path on Rt. 1 17 from Rt. 126 to the Mt. Misery parking 
lot, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED; (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

It was moved, seconded and unanimously voted to take up Article 27 out of order following 
Article 20. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, said 
monies to be put into the Town's Stabilization Fund, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED: (By a Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $200,000.00 to be placed 
in the Town's Stabilization Fund, provided, however, that this appropriation shall 
be contingent upon passage at the Town election of a proposition 2 Vz override 
question under General Laws Chapter 59, section 21 C (g). 

An amendment to replace this motion with the following motion was defeated by a majority voice 
vote: ' To appropriate $400,000.00 for the Stabilization Fund, contingent on the override 
passing, but appropriate only $200,000.00 contingent on the override failing. In either case, 
taking what money is necessary from free cash; and to create a self Stabilization Fund for those 
who choose to pay next year's taxes early." 

At 5:40 P.M. it was moved, seconded and unanimously voted to adjourn the meeting to 
Tuesday, March 26, 1996 at 7:30 p.m. 



26 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 25, 1996 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting, the Polls were 
opened at 7:30 a.m. by Town Clerk, Nancy J. Zuelke. The following Wardens assisted Mrs. 
Zuelke throughout the day: Thomas Coan, Peggy Elliott, Marshall Sandock, Eleanor Wilfert, and 
Larry Zuelke. The Polls were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. The total number of votes was 889 
with the following results: 



Office 


Candidate 


Total 


Moderator (3 yrs) 


John B. French 

Scattering 

Blanks 


736 

1 

152 

889 


Town Clerk (1 yr) 


Nancy J. Zuelke 
Blanks 


770 
119 
889 


Board of Selectmen (3 yrs) 


John S. Kerr II 
Blanks 


725 
164 
889 


Town Treasurer (1 yr) 


Roy M. Raja 

Scattering 

Blanks 


670 

1 

218 

889 


Board of Assessors (3 yrs) 


L. Bruce Long 

Scattering 

Blanks 


671 

2 

216 

889 


School Committee (2) 
(3 yrs) 


Patrick G. Phillips 
Patricia M. Mostue 
Blanks 


565 

616 

597 

1778 


Water Commissioner (3 yrs) 


Margaret B. Marsh 
Blanks 


716 
173 
889 


Board of Health (3 yrs) 


Frederick L. Mansfield 
Blanks 


706 
183 
889 


Cemetery Commissioner (3 yrs) 


Natalie A. Faddoul 
Blanks 


721 
168 



27 



Office 


Candidate 


Planning Board (5 yrs) 


James B. White 




Scattering 




Blanks 


Commissioner of Trust Funds 


Scattering 


(3 yrs) 


Blanks 


Trustee of Bemis Fund (3 yrs) 


Dan Dimancescu 




Blanks 


Trustee DeCordova & Dana 


Joseph Bower 


Museum (4 yrs) 


Blanks 


Housing Commission (3 yrs) 


Scattering 




Blanks 


Recreation Committee (3 yrs) 


Donna L. Johnson 




Blanks 


Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School 


Janet C. Miller 


District (2) (3 yrs) 


Frances Caspe 




Stephen Silverman 




Blanks 



Total 

665 

5 

219 

889 

2 
887 
889 

651 
238 
889 

680 
209 
889 

2 
887 
889 

648 
241 
889 

748 
140 
255 
635 
1778 



Question 1 



"Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to assess an 
additional $200,000 in real estate and personal 
property taxes for the purpose of appropriating said 
funds to the Town's Stabilization Fund for the fiscal 
year beginning July first nineteen hundred and ninety- 
six?" 

Total 
Yes 389 

No 480 

Blanks _20 

889 



28 






ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
March 26, 1996 

On Tuesday, March 26, 1996 the adjourned session of the March 23, 1996 Annual Town 
Meeting was called to order at 7:45 p.m. by the Moderator, Mr. John B. French and a quorum 
being present, (149 voters throughout the night), the following business was transacted. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be 
used by the conservation department for the purchase of vehicles and/or 
equipment, and to see if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise 
of excess vehicles and equipment, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VIOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be 
used for the acquisition of new voting machines, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED: (By a Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $7,500.00 from free cash to be 
used to acquire an optical scanning unit to permit automated counting of paper 
ballots. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to further alter the sources of funding for the 
construction of a CT disinfection facility for Flint's Pond water supply, authorization 
for which construction and funding was previously given by vote adopted under 
Article 1 of the Warrant for the March 27, 1993 Special Town Meeting, and 
subsequently amended by votes adopted under Article 30 of the Warrant for the 
1994 Annual Town Meeting and Article 29 of the Warrant for the 1995 Annual 
Town Meeting, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to further alter the sources of funding regarding the original 
appropriation for the construction of a CT disinfection facility for Flint's Pond water 
supply, by appropriating the sum of $182,000.00 from Water Department surplus 
in order to supplement $615,000.00 previously appropriated for said purpose from 
Water Department surplus under Article 1 of the Warrant for the March 27, 1993 
Special Town Meeting, under Article 30 of the 1994 Annual Town Meeting and 
under Article 29 of the 1995 Annual Town Meeting, and by voting to reduce the 
amount previously authorized to be borrowed for said purpose under Article 1 of 
the Warrant for the March 27, 1993 Special Town Meeting and under Article 30 of 
the 1994 Town Meeting and under Article 29 of the 1995 Annual Town Meeting 
from a sum of $915,000.00 to $733,000.00. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to clean 
and surge the Tower Road Well, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 from water department 
surplus to clean and surge the Tower Road Well. 



29 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, for 
replacement of an existing water main located in the vicinity of Baker Farm Road, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $25,000.00 from water department 
revenue for the purchase of 8" water pipe with appropriate fire hydrants to 
complete a loop between Baker Bridge Road and Baker Farm Road where the 
main will connect with a new water main extending from Granville Road to the 
Isis/Adams property. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be 
used by the water department for the purchase of vehicles and/or equipment, and 
to see if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise of excess 
vehicles and equipment, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (On the Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $33,000.00 from water department 
surplus to be used to purchase a replacement four wheel drive pick-up truck and 
related equipment for the water department, and to authorize the Selectmen to 
dispose by sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment. 

ARTICLE 27. (Following Article 20) 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Map of the Town in order to 
expand the boundaries of the NL-North Lincoln Planning District, an overlay 
district, established pursuant to Article 5 of the Warrant for the November 1, 1986 
Special Town Meeting, by undertaking the following action: 

By amending the Zoning Map of the Town to expand and/or alter the boundaries 
of the "NL-North Lincoln Planning District", by adding land area encompassing 46 
acres, more or less, and being more particularly shown and described on a plan of 
land entitled "Lincoln, Mass. Zoning Districts, Proposed Addition to North Lincoln 
Planning District", dated March 4, 1995, and on a topographic plan entitled 
"Proposed Addition to the North Lincoln Planning District - Overlay District", dated 
March 3, 1995 a copy of said plans are available for inspection in the Town Hall 
and in the Office of the Town Clerk, or as further described as follows: 

Lot #4-1 a consisting of 1 7.5 acres (of 1 60.94), more or less 

Lot #4-1 b consisting of 1 7 acres (of 1 60.94), more or less 

Lot #4-4 consisting of 1 .47 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-5 consisting of 1 .48 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-6 consisting of 0.07 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-7 consisting of 0.1 5 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-8 consisting of 1 .70 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-9.03 consisting of 4.71 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-1 1 .02 consisting of 1 .1 1 acres, more or less 

and/or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 



30 






ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law in order to establish a 
third North Lincoln Planned Development District within the NL-North Lincoln 
Planning District, pursuant to Article 5 of the Warrant for the November 1, 1986 
Special Town Meeting, as amended, by undertaking the following actions: 

With respect to the creation of a proposed "North Lincoln Planned Development 
District No. 3" for commercial office development, by 

(i) amending the Zoning Map to include the North Lincoln Planned Development 
District No. 3, having boundaries encompassing 19 acres, more or less, and being 
more particularly shown and described on plans entitled "Proposed North Lincoln 
Planned Development District No. 3 - Office", dated January 3, 1996, and a 
topographic plan entitled "Proposed Boundaries of North Lincoln Planned 
Development District No. 3 - Office", dated January 4, 1996 or as further 
described as follows: 

Lot #4-1 a consisting of 17.5 acres (of 160.94), more or less 
Lot #4-4 consisting of 1 .47 acres, more or less, and 

(ii) by approving a preliminary development and use plan for the North Lincoln 
Planned Development District No. 3, a proposed copy of which preliminary 
development and use plan shall be filed with the Town Clerk and Clerk of the 
Planning Board pursuant to Section 12.5 at least twenty-one days before the date 
of the Planning Board hearing on this petition. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law in order to establish a 
third North Lincoln Planned Development District within the NL-North Lincoln 
Planning District, pursuant to Article 5 of the Warrant for the November 1, 1986 
Special Town Meeting, as amended, by undertaking the following actions: 

With respect to the creation of a proposed "North Lincoln Planned Development 
District No. 4" for commercial office development, by 

(i) amending the Zoning Map to include the North Lincoln Planned Development 
District No. 4, having boundaries encompassing 28 acres, more or less, and being 
more particularly shown and described on plans entitled "Proposed North Lincoln 
Planned Development District No. 4 - Office", dated January 5, 1996, and a 
topographic plan entitled "Proposed Boundaries of North Lincoln Planned 
Development District No. 4 - Office", dated January 6, 1996 or as further 
described as follows: 

Lot #4-1 b consisting of 17 acres (of 160.94), more or less 

Lot #4-4 consisting of 1 .47 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-5 consisting of 1 .48 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-6 consisting of 0.07 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-7 consisting of 0.1 5 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-8 consisting of 1 .70 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-9.03 consisting of 4.71 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-1 1 .02 consisting of 1 .1 1 acres, more or less 



31 



VOTED: 



by approving a preliminary development and use plan for the North Lincoln 
Planned Development District No. 4, a proposed copy of which preliminary 
development and use plan shall be filed with the Town Clerk and the Clerk of the 
Planning Board pursuant to Section 12.5 at least twenty-one days before the date 
of the Planning Board hearing on this petition. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 



ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue, to the extent of its interest therein, (i) 
that portion of Virginia Road which lies between State Route 2A at its eastern end, 
and the west end property line of Hartwell Tavern to the west, a distance of 
approximately 2000 feet, and (ii) that portion of Bedford Lane which lies between 
State Route 2A on the south and Virginia Road on the north, a distance of 
approximately 800 feet, and to authorize such conveyances or releases by the 
Town as may be necessary to effectively transfer all of the Town's right in and to 
said discontinued ways to the United States of America, or the appropriate 
department thereof, for the use of the Minute Man National Historical Park, and in 
connection therewith to establish conditions regarding the retention by the Town 
of easements or rights for access to public utilities and public safety vehicle 
access, the assumption by the United States of America or the appropriate 
department thereof of all obligations of maintenance of such ways following the 
discontinuance, and such other conditions relating to the aforesaid discontinuance 
as the Selectmen may deem appropriate; or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED: (By a standing vote of 120 in favor, 4 opposed) 

That the Town vote to discontinue, as public ways, (i) that portion of Virginia Road 
which lies between State Route 2A at its eastern end, and the west end property 
line of Hartwell Tavern to the west, a distance of approximately 2000 feet, and (ii) 
that portion of Bedford Lane which lies between State Route 2A on the south and 
Virginia Road on the north, a distance of approximately 800 feet, and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to undertake such conveyances or releases by the Town 
as may be necessary to effectively transfer all of the Town's right in and to said 
discontinued ways to the United States of America, or the appropriate department 
thereof, for the use of the Minute Man National Historical Park, provided that all 
such actions shall be effective only upon certification by a majority of the Board of 
Selectmen that (1) satisfactory easements or rights for access to public utilities 
and public safety vehicle access have been provided to the Town, (2) the United 
States of America or the appropriate department thereof has assumed all 
obligations of maintenance of such ways following the discontinuance, and (3) 
such other conditions relating to the aforesaid discontinuance as the Selectmen 
may deem appropriate have been satisfied. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to permanently dedicate and restrict all or portions of 
certain Town land known as the Codman Farm in order to better secure the 
permanent conservation of such property for agricultural and/or open space and 
conservation uses, said Town land being approximately 20.4 acres and being 
bounded by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority railroad right of way, 
the Codman Mansion (Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities), 
Codman Road and Lincoln Road, consisting of Parcels 2, 40 and 42 as shown on 
the Town's Assessor's Map No. 95 and also as shown on a schematic plan 
delineating proposed areas of restriction (the "Schematic Plan") which is on file 
with the Town Clerk, saving and excepting from such restrictions, however, to the 



32 



VOTED: 



extent deemed appropriate, (i) the existing Codman Farmhouse and adjoining 
structures and property which is proposed to remain available for housing and/or 
agricultural purposes, and (ii) an area of approximately two acres lying in the 
southeast quadrant of such Town land and adjacent to the Dohenys Service 
Station lot, as depicted on the Schematic Plan; and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and/or other appropriate Town boards to execute such documents or 
instruments (which may include the granting of rights of enforcement of such 
restrictions to an appropriate non-profit organization or other entity), as may be 
deemed necessary to accomplish such restrictions as to use; or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
(By a Majority Voice Vote) 
To Pass over this article. 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, and to 
authorize the Selectmen to utilize said funding, if necessary, to join with the 
Towns of Bedford, Lexington and/or Concord in securing technical expertise or 
consulting services to assist in the review of the Massport request for proposal to 
privatize the development and management of Hanscom Field, or take any other 
action relative thereto 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to work in cooperation with 
the Towns of Bedford, Concord and/or Lexington to assess the feasibility of 
developing, and/or to develop and submit a joint proposal on behalf of such 
Towns in response to the Massport request for proposals for the development and 
management of Hanscom Field, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XI. Miscellaneous of its general by- 
laws, by amending paragraph A. of section 3A, Public Way Access Permits , so 
that such paragraph A. shall read substantially as follow: 

A. Purpose. It is the purpose of this By-law to provide for the review of public way 
access permit applications and to establish procedures for the predictable, timely, 
and uniform review of such applications so as to ensure public safety. These 
procedures apply to public way access permit applications for: (1) new access to 
a public way; (2) physical modification to existing access to a public way; (3) 
use of new or existing access to serve the building or expansion of a facility or use 
that generates a substantial increase in or impacts on traffic on a public way (new 
language is underlined) . 

or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to amend Article XI. Miscellaneous , of its General By-laws, by 
amending paragraph A. of section 3A, Public Way Access Permits , so that such 
paragraph A. shall read as follows: 



A. Purpose 

It is the purpose of this By-law to provide for the review of public way access 

permit applications and to establish procedures for the predictable, timely, and 



33 



uniform review of such applications so as to ensure public safety. These 
procedures apply to public way access permit applications for: (1) new access to 
a public way; (2) physical modification to existing access to a public way; (3) 
use of new or existing access to serve the building or expansion of a facility or use 
that generates a substantial increase in or impacts on traffic on a public wav (new 
language is underlined). 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VI, Contracts by Town Officers , of its 
general by-laws by deleting Section 6 thereof in its entirety, or by undertaking any 
other amendment of said Section 6, all in order to assure that the provisions of the 
by-law are in harmony with Chapter 30B of the General Laws dealing with 
municipal contracts for services or supplies; or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That Town vote to amend Article VI, Contracts by Town Officers , of its General 
By-laws by deleting the Section 6 thereof in its entirety in order to assure that the 
provisions of the by-law are in harmony with Chapter 30B of the General Laws 
dealing with municipal contracts for services or supplies. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to accept the laying out as a public way of the private 
road known as Garland Road from Sandy Pond Road to Partridge Lane - 
Deerhaven, as shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Lincoln, 
Massachusetts, Middlesex County, being a subdivision of Lot 1 shown on Land 
Court Plan 29457A", dated May 29, 1985, by Boston Survey Consultants, 
approved by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln on October 2, 1985, and 
recorded in the South Middlesex District Registry of Deeds on Land Court Plan 
Number 29457C, and having the boundaries shown on a plan included in the 
order of laying out adopted by the Board of Selectmen with respect to such way 
and filed in the office of the Town Clerk in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 82, Sections 21-23 of the General Laws; and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire by purchase, eminent domain, gift or otherwise for highway 
purposes the fee or any lesser interests contained within such way, as well as 
easements for drainage, slope or otherwise in any lands that may be necessary 
for such way, and to determine whether the Town will appropriate money therefor, 
to be provided by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any 
combination thereof; or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to accept the laying out as a public way of the private way 
known as Garland Road as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Garland Road in 
Lincoln, Massachusetts, Middlesex County, Laid out as a public way by the Board 
of Selectmen" dated February 14, 1996, by The BSC Group, which plan is 
included in the order of laying out adopted by the Board of Selectmen on March 4, 
1996 and placed on file with the Town Clerk, in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 82, Sections 21-23 of the General Laws; and vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, gift, eminent domain or otherwise for 
highway purposes the fee or any lesser interests contained within such way, as 
well as easements for drainage, slope or otherwise in any lands that may be 
necessary for such way, and to appropriate the sum of ten dollars ($10.00) from 
free cash for such acquisition, provided that as a condition to such acceptance a 
majority of the Board of Selectmen shall determine that the construction of such 
way has been satisfactorily completed in accordance with all applicable Town 
regulations. 



34 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to establish a 
revolving fund account in accordance with Chapter 44, Sections 53 E-Vfe of the 
General Laws, in order to place in such account the revenues collected from the 
sale of compost bins, which revenues shall be expended under the authority of 
the Selectmen without further appropriation to purchase additional compost bins 
or advertise the availability of such bins or undertake related expenses; or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to establish a revolving 
fund account in accordance with Chapter 44, Sections 53 E-% of the General 
Laws, in order to place in such account revenues collected from the sale of 
compost bins, which revenues shall be expended up to an amount of $5,000.00 
under the authority of the Selectmen without further appropriation to purchase 
additional compost bins or advertise the availability of such bins or undertake 
related expenses 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to establish a law enforcement trust fund account 
pursuant to Chapter 94C, Section 47 of the General Laws, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend various provisions of its Zoning By-law, 
including Section 5.4 and 19.1(e) thereof, in order to specifically include the 
frontage and signage requirements of the Zoning By-law within the listing of 
development regulations which are imposed upon land or structures devoted to 
religious and public or non-public educational uses, including museums and 
libraries, within the Town to the extent permitted by Chapter 40A, Section 3 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, the text of which proposed By-law amendments is 
available for inspection at the office of the Town Clerk; or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to amend its Zoning By-law, in the following manner: 

(i) by adding the words "frontage" and "signage" to the listing of development 
regulations referred to in Section 5.4 of the Zoning By-law, so that said Section 
5.4 (with new language underlined) shall read in its entirety as follows: 

"5.4 Notwithstanding the foregoing, land or structures described in paragraphs 
5.1, 5.2 and 5.3 of this section shall conform to all regulations concerning the bulk 
and height of structures, yard sizes, lot area, setbacks, frontage , open space, 
width of lot through the building, signage , parking and building coverage of the 
district in which the land lies, provided, however, that in the case of land or 
structures referred to in paragraph 5.3, such development regulations may be 
determined by the Planning Board to be inapplicable in whole or in part pursuant 
to Section 19.1(e) below." 

and 

(ii) by adding the words "frontage" and "signage" to the listing of development 
regulations referred to in the first sentence of subparagraphs (e) of Section 19.1 
of the Zoning By-law, so that such first sentence of subparagraph (e) of Section 
19.1 (with new language underlined) shall read in its entirety as follows: 



35 



"(e) In conjunction with any application for a building permit involving land or 
structures devoted to religious or educational uses governed by G.L. c. 40A, s. 3, 
the applicant may also submit a written request for exemption from any one or 
more, or all, of the development regulations relating to the bulk and height of 
structures, yard sizes, lot area, setbacks, frontage , open space, width of lot, 
signage , parking and building coverage for the district in which the applicant's land 
lies." 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to amend provisions of Section 4 of its Zoning By-law, 
entitled "Nonconforming Uses", including section 4.5 dealing with lots established 
prior to June 6, 1955, in order to require that a structure on any lot within the Town 
may not be built or extended so as to encroach upon, or encroach further within, 
current yard setback requirements of the Zoning By-law except upon certain 
findings being made by the Board of Appeals, the text of which proposed By-law 
amendments is available for inspection at the office of the Town Clerk; or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
(Unanimously) 
To pass over this article. 



VOTED: 
ARTICLE 42 



To see if the Town will vote to approve an amendment to the bylaws of the 
DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park which has been adopted by the 
Corporation, eliminating the reference to "Member" in the bylaws wherever it 
appears and substituting a reference to "Overseer," and providing that the term of 
any Overseer elected after May 1, 1994 shall be three (3) years rather than ten 
(10) years, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to approve an amendment to the bylaws of the DeCordova 
and Dana Museum and Park which has been adopted by the Corporation, 
eliminating the reference to "Member" in the bylaws wherever it appears and 
substituting a reference to "Overseer," and providing that the term of any 
Overseer elected after May 1, 1994 shall be three (3) years rather than ten (10) 
years. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to accept the laying out as public ways of the private 
roads known as Warbler Springs, Cerulean Way, and Blackburnian Road from 
Tower Road, said roads being shown on a plan entitled "Warbler Springs, 
Definitive Plan, Plan of Land in Lincoln, Massachusetts", prepared by Schofield 
Brothers, Inc., Professional Engineers & Registered Land Surveyors, dated 
January 31, 1984, approved on May 2, 1984 and endorsed by the Lincoln 
Planning Board on December 3, 1986, which plan is recorded with the South 
Middlesex District Registry of Deeds in Book 17649, Page 256, and having the 
boundaries shown on plans included in the order of laying out adopted by the 
Board of Selectmen with respect to such way and filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 82, Section 21-23 of the 
General Laws; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, 
eminent domain, gift or otherwise for highway purposes the fee or any lesser 
interests contained within such way, as well as easements for drainage, slope or 
otherwise in any lands that may be necessary for such way, and to determine 
whether the Town will appropriate money therefor, to be provided by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof; or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to accept the laying out as public ways of the private roads 
known as Warbler Springs, Cerulean Way and Blackburnian Road from Tower 



36 



Road, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Warbler Springs Road, Cerulean Way, 
and Blackburnian Road, Located in Lincoln, Massachusetts, Middlesex County, 
Laid out as a public way by the Board of Selectmen" dated March 1, 1996, by 
Richard F. Kaminski and Associates, Inc., which plan : s included in the order of 
laying out adopted by the Board of Selectmen on March 4, 1 996 and on file with 
the Town Clerk, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 82, Sections 21 -23 
of the General Laws; and vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by 
purchase, gift, eminent domain or otherwise for highway purposes the fee or any 
lesser interests contained within such way, as well as easements for drainage, 
slope or otherwise in any lands that may be necessary for such way, and to 
appropriate the sum of ten dollars ($10.00) from free cash for such acquisition, 
provided that as a condition to such acceptance a majority of the Board of 
Selectmen shall determine that the construction of such way has been 
satisfactorily completed in accordance with applicable Town regulations. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for 
installation of new fire and safety equipment to the Hartwell Building Pod C at the 
schools, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

At various stages of the Meeting, tribute was paid to several officers as follows: 

Gus Browne retiring from the Housing Commission 

Tom Black who retired from the Housing Commission to become a member of the Finance 

Committee 
Henry Morgan retiring from the School Committee 
Perry Culver retiring from the Board of Health 

The Council on Aging and the Selectmen presented the Boston Post Cane to the oldest resident 
Grace S. Downing. 

There being no further business to come before the Meeting, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously voted to dissolve the Meeting at 9:00 p.m. 



37 



STATE PRIMARY 
September 17, 1996 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open at 7:00 a.m. by Nancy 
J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assisted throughout the day by the following wardens: Thomas 
Coan, Marshall Sandock, Jacquelyn Snelling, and Laurence Zuelke. The Polls were declared 
closed at 8:00 p.m. by Mrs. Zuelke. The total number of votes cast was 270, which was divided 
as follows: Republican - 64, Democratic - 206, with the following results: 



Office 



Republican 
Candidate 



Total 



Senator in Congress 

Rep. in Congress (5 th District) 
Rep. in Congress (7 th District) 

Councillor (3 rd District) 

Senator in Gen. Court 

(15 th Middlesex District) 



Rep. in Gen. Court 

(15 ,h Middlesex District) 



William F. Weld 
Blanks 



Blanks 

Patricia H. Long 
Blanks 



Blanks 

Hasty Evans 
Blanks 



John T. Cunha 
Blanks 



59 

4 

64 



56 

7 
63 

64 

53 
11 
64 

58 

6 

64 



Register of Probate 

(Middlesex County) 



Donna M. Lambert 

Scattering 

Blanks 



57 
1 
6 

64 



County Treasurer (Middlesex County) Blanks 



County Commissioner (2) 
(Middlesex County) 



Anthony G. Marino 
Jerry Vengrow 
Blanks 



64 

46 
34 
48 
128 



Sheriff (Middlesex County) 



Brad Bailey 
Blanks 



61 

3 

64 



38 





Democratic 




Office 


Candidate 


Total 


Senator in Congress 


John F. Kerry 


175 




Scattering 


1 




Blanks 


30 
206 


Rep. in Congress (5 th District) 


Martin T. Meehan 


4 




Patrick M. Raymond 







Blanks 



4 


Rep. in Congress (7 th District) 


Edward J. Markey 


163 




Blanks 


39 
202 


Councillor (3 rd District) 


Cynthia Stone Creem 


135 




Blanks 


Zl 

206 


Senator in Gen. Court 


Susan Fargo 


185 


(15 th Middlesex District) 


Scattering 


1 




Blanks 


20 
206 


Rep. in Gen. Court 


Jay R. Kaufman 


171 


(15 th Middlesex District) 


Blanks 


35 
206 


Register of Probate 


Robert B. Antonelli 


10 


(Middlesex County) 


John J. Buckley 


4 




Francis X. Flaherty 


8 




Diane Poulos Harpell 


72 




Marie E. Howe 


8 




Joyce E. Hurley 


9 




Ronald A. MacDonald 







Wanda M. Milik 


54 




Blanks 


41 
206 


County Treasurer (Middlesex County) 


James E. Fahey, Jr. 


91 




Warren R. McManus 


34 




Blanks 


81 
206 


County Commissioner (2) 


Thomas J. Larkin 


97 


(Middlesex County) 


Melissa Hurley 


14 




James P. Kennedy 


4 




Eleanor A. McGarry 


47 




Joseph W. Mullin 


87 




Edward J. Sullivan 


15 




Blanks 


148 
412 



39 



Office Candidate Total 

Sheriff (Middlesex County) James V. DiPaola 41 

Leonard H. Golder 54 

Edward J. Kennedy, Jr. 36 

Edward J. Rideout 12 

Scattering 2 

Blanks 61 

206 

The Libertarian Ballot had no candidates for any of the offices. Not voter voted a Libertarian 
Ballot. 

The total number of registered voters for this election was 3354. 

A recount was held by the Lincoln Board of Registrars on September 30, 1996 at 11:00 a.m. at 
the Town Offices pursuant to a petition for such recount. As determined by the recount, the 
votes for the office of Democratic County Commissioner of Middlesex County were as follows: 

Office Candidate Total 

County Commissioner (2) Thomas J. Larkin 99 

(Middlesex County) Melissa Hurley 15 

James P. Kennedy 4 

Eleanor A. McGarry 47 

Joseph W. Mullin 88 

Edward J. Sullivan 15 

Blanks 146 

414 



40 



STATE ELECTION 
November 5, 1996 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open at 7:00 a.m. by Nancy 
J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assisted throughout the day by the following wardens: Thomas 
Coan, Peggy Elliott, Marshall Sandock, Jacquelyn Snelling, and Laurence Zuelke. The Polls 
were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by Mrs. Zuelke. The total number of votes cast was 3209, 
with 3076 in Precinct 1A and 132 in Precinct 1B. The total number of registered voters was 
3573. Results are as follows: 



Office 



Candidate 



Total 



President & Vice President 



Browne & Jorgensen 
Clinton & Gore 
Dole & Kemp 
Hagelin & Tompkins 
Moorehead & LaRiva 
Perot & Choate 
Ralph Nader 
Scattering 
Blanks 



39 

1973 

988 

12 

4 

131 

28 

7 

27 

3209 



United States Senator 



Rep. in Congress (5 th District) 



John F. Kerry 
William F. Weld 
Susan C. Gallagher 
Robert C. Stowe 
Blanks 



Martin T. Meehan 
Blanks 



1727 
1418 

32 
5 

26 
3208 

100 

32 

132 



Rep. in Congress (7 District) 



Edward J. Markey 
Patricia H. Long 
Blanks 



1844 

1082 

150 

3076 



Councillor (3 rd District) 



Cynthia Stone Creem 

Scattering 

Blanks 



1808 

5 

1395 

3208 



Senator in Gen. Court 

(5 th Middlesex District) 



Hasty Evans 
Susan Fargo 
Scattering 
Blanks 



1129 

1950 

1 

128 

3208 



Rep. in Gen. Court 

(15 th Middlesex District) 



Jay R. Kaufman 
John T. Cunha 
Blanks 



2100 
836 
272 

3208 






41 



Office 



Candidate 



Total 



Register of Probate 

Middlesex County 



Donna M. Lambert 
Robert B. Antonelli 
Diane Poulos Harpell 
Scattering 
Blanks 



1445 

1095 

4 

1 

663 

3208 



County Treasurer (Middlesex County) 



James E. Fahey, Jr. 
Roy M. Raja 
Scattering 
Blanks 



1765 

4 

4 

1435 

3208 



County Commissioner (2) 
(Middlesex County) 



Thomas J. Larkin 
Anthony G. Marino 
Edward J. Sullivan 
Jerry Vengrow 
Scattering 
Blanks 



1578 

944 

898 

615 

3 

2378 

6416 



Sheriff (Middlesex County) 



Brad Bailey 
James V. DiPaola 
Scattering 
Blanks 



1450 

1187 

5 

566 

3208 



Question 1 



LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 



Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which 
no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of 
Representatives before May 1 , 1 996? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would prohibit the use of certain 
traps for fur-bearing mammals, prohibit certain 
methods of hunting bear and bobcat, and eliminates 
some restrictions on who may serve on the State 
Fisheries and Wildlife Board. 

The proposed law would prohibit the use, setting, 
manufacture, or possession of any trap to capture fur- 
bearing mammals, except common mouse and rat 
traps, nets, and box or cage traps that confine a whole 
animal without grasping any part of it. Traps designed 
to grip an animal's body or body part, such as steel jaw 
leghold traps, padded leghold traps, and snares, would 
be prohibited. Federal and state health officials could 
use such traps in case of a threat to human health or 
safety. Where a property owner had reasonably tried 
but failed to correct an animal problem on the property 



42 



using a legal trap, the owner could apply for and the 
State Director of Fisheries and Wildlife could issue a 
permit to use a prohibited type of trap, except a leghold 
trap, for up to 30 days to correct the problem. 

A person violating any of these requirements could be 
punished by a fine of between $300 and $1000, or 
imprisonment for up to 6 months, or both, for each 
prohibited trap and each day of violation. A person 
convicted for second violation would be required to 
surrender, and could never again obtain any trapping 
license or problem animal control permit. 

The proposed law would also prohibit the pursuit or 
hunting of bear or bobcat with the aid of a dog or dogs. 
Hunting bear using any type of bait, lure, or attraction, 
or knowingly hunting bear in a baited area, would also 
be prohibited. The Director could allow the use of dogs 
or bait in legitimate scientific research projects and in 
order to control particular animals that posed a threat to 
human safety or that destroyed livestock, property or 
crops. 

Violators could be punished by a fine of between $300 
and $1000, or imprisonment, or both, for each violation. 
A person convicted for a second violation would be 
required to surrender, and could never again obtain, 
any hunting and dog training licenses and permits. 

The proposed law would eliminate the requirement that 
five members of the State Fisheries and Wildlife Board 
have held sporting licenses in the State for five 
consecutive years and that four members represent 
fishing, hunting, and trapping interests. 

The proposed law states that if any of its provisions 
were declared invalid, the other provisions would 
remain in effect. 

A yes vote would prohibit the use of certain traps for 
fur-bearing mammals, prohibit certain methods of 
hunting bear or bobcat and eliminate some restrictions 
on who may serve on the Fisheries and Wildlife Board. 

A no vote would make no change in the trapping or 
hunting laws, and would retain restrictions on who may 
serve on the Fisheries and Wildlife Board. 



Yes 


2055 


No 


889 


Blanks 


264 




3208 



43 



Question 2 THIS QUESTION IS NOT BINDING 



Shall the state representative from this district be 
instructed to vote in favor of legislation that: 

Limits spending on political campaigns; 
Removes the influence of contributions by large 
donors; and 

Creates a level playing field for candidates and voters, 
By providing the option of public financing to 
candidates who agree to strict spending limits? 



Yes 


2627 


No 


271 


Blanks 


310 




3208 



The total number of registered voters for this election was 3573. 



44 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
December 10, 1996 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Special Town Meeting was called to order in the 
Donaldson Auditorium on December 10, 1996 by the Moderator, Mr. John B. French, at 7:45 
p.m. and a quorum being present, (194 voters) the following business was transacted: 



ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the 
purpose of supplementing funding previously appropriated under Article 7, of the 
Warrant for the 1995 Annual Town Meeting, all in order to meet the anticipated 
cost of designing and carrying out renovations and additions to the Town's Public 
Safety Building, including the purchase of equipment and the incurring of related 
costs, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED; That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $230,000 from free cash for the 

purpose of supplementing funding previously appropriated under Article 7, of the 
Warrant for the 1995 Annual Town Meeting, all in order to meet the anticipated 
cost of designing and carrying out renovations and additions to the Town's Public 
Safety Building, including the purchase of equipment and the incurring of related 
costs. 

There being no further business to come before the Meeting, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously voted to dissolve the Meeting at 8:55 p.m. 



45 



FINANCE 



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48 



OUTSTANDING DEBT AT JUNE 30, 1996 



620,000 General Obligation Bonds, 5.7696%, due $370,000 March 15, 1997 and 

due $250,000 March 15, 1998, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) and (3A) 
and 7(25), and Ch. 359 of the Acts of 1979, S. 3 of the G.L. 

1,460,000 General Obligation Bond, 6.3481%, due $365,000 each November 15, 

1996-99, issued under Ch. 44 S. 7(3), S. 8(22), and S. 8(24) of the G.L. 



2,080,000 TOTAL MUNICIPAL LOANS 



2,080,000 TOTAL DEBT (BONDED) 



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52 



TOWN OF LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES & CHANGES IN FUND 
BALANCE, ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1996 











Combined 






Special 


Capital 


Totals (Memor- 




General Fund 


Revenue 


Projects 


andum only) 


REVENUES: 










Property taxes 


$ 10,738,775 $ 


$ 




$ 10,738,775 


Motor vehicle excise 


647,391 






647,391 


Departmental and other 


339,813 


376,486 




716,299 


Licenses and permits 


116,391 






116,391 


Intergovernmental 


2,414,997 


7,571,682 




9,986,678 


Investment income 


436,734 






436,734 


Fines 


65,353 






65,353 


Miscellaneous 


242,325 


109,341 




351,666 



EXPENDITURES: 
Current: 
General government 
Public safety 
Health and sanitation 
Public works 
Education and library 
Recreation 
Cemetery 
Veteran's services 
Debt service - principal 
Debt service - interest 
Special articles 
Insurance and employee 
benefits 
Capital outlays 
Intergovernmental assess. 
Total expenditures 
Excess (deficiency) of 

revenues over expenditures 
OTHER FINANCING 
SOURCES (USES): 
Operating transfers in 
Operating transfers out 
Total other financing 
sources (uses) 
Excess (deficiency) of revenue 
and other sources over 
expenditures and other uses 
FUND BALANCE, beginning 
of year 
FUND BALANCE, end of year 



$ 15,001,779 $ 8,057,509 



1,118,530 


75,898 


1,600,028 


135,504 


153,649 




1,053,258 




6,347,093 


7,658,411 


195,279 


61,006 


16,036 




7,245 




765,000 




691,598 




1,067,275 




1,425,017 





3,570,411 



226,076 



$ 23,059,287 



1,194,428 

1,735,532 

153,649 

1,053,258 

14,005,504 

256,285 

16,036 

7,245 

765,000 

691,598 

1,067,275 

1,425,017 

3,570,411 

226,076 



$ 14,666,084 $ 7,930,819 $ 3,570,411 $ 26,167,314 



335,695 



126,690 (3,570,411) (3,108,027) 



370,197 
(34.000) 



34,000 



336,197 



(159,497) 



(159,497) 



404,197 
(193,497) 



34,000 



210,700 



671,892 



3.226.177 



(32,807) (3,536,411) (2,897,327) 



589,939 (8.305.538) (4,489, 422 ) 



$ 3,898,069 $ 557,132 $(11,841,949) $ (7,386,749) 



53 



TOWN OF LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES OF GENERAL FUND 

BUDGET AND ACTUAL - BUDGETARY BASIS 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1996 









Variance 








Favorable 




Budget 


Actual 


Unfavorable 


REVENUES: 








Property taxes 


$ 10,788,934 


$ 10,788,934 


$ 


Motor vehicle excise 


343,599 


647,391 


303,792 


Departmental and other 


326,000 


339,813 


13,813 


Licenses and permits 


90,000 


116,391 


26,391 


Intergovernmental 


2,059,040 


2,414,997 


355,957 


Interest 


225,000 


423,368 


198,368 


Fines 


52,000 


65,353 


13,353 


Miscellaneous 


100,000 


242,325 


142,325 




13,984,573 


15,038,572 


1,053,999 


EXPENDITURES: 








General government 


1,166,910 


1,119,909 


47,001 


Public safety 


1,621,816 


1,601,344 


20,472 


Health and sanitation 


156,502 


153,733 


2,769 


Public works 


942,211 


1,053,443 


(111,232) 


Education and library 


6,408,347 


6,405,794 


2,553 


Recreation 


204,232 


195,437 


8,795 


Cemetery 


20,050 


16,036 


4,014 


Veteran's services 


7,405 


7,246 


159 


Debt service 


1,562,718 


1,411,502 


151,216 


Special articles 


1,292,715 


1,254,776 


37,939 


Insurance and employee 






- 


benefits 


1,536,153 


1,425,017 


111,136 


Intergovernmental assess. 


235,335 


226,076 


9,259 


Total expenditures 


15,154,394 


14,870,313 


284,081 


Excess (deficiency) of 








revenues over expenditures 


(1,169,821) 


168,259 


1,338,080 


OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 








(USES): 








Operating transfers in 


359,970 


370,197 


10,227 


Operating transfers out 


(34,000) 


(34,000) 




Stabilization fund contribution 


(168,036) 


(168,036) 




Available surplus 


1,011,887 




(1,011,887) 


Total other financing sources 








(uses) 


1,169,821 


168,161 


(1,001,660) 


Excess (deficiency) of revenues 








and other financing sources 








over expenditures and other 








uses 


$ 


$ 336,420 


$ 336,420 



54 



TOWN OF LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN RETAINED 
EARNINGS/FUND BALANCES - PROPRIETARY FUND TYPE AND SIMILAR TRUST 
FUNDS YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1996 





Proprietary 


Fiduciary 






Fgnd Type 


Fund Type 


Combined 
Totals 




Enterprise 


Nonexpendable 


(Memorandum 




Fund 


Trust Fund 


Only) 


Operating Revenues: 








Charges for services 


$ 832,813 


$ 110,153 


$ 942,966 


Gifts and bequests 




22,770 


22.770 




832,813 


132,923 


965,736 


Operating Expenses: 








General government 




160,025 


160,025 


Operating 


191,290 




191,290 


Salaries 


148,567 




148,567 


Depreciation 


87,516 
427,373 




87,516 




160,025 


587,398 


Operating income (loss) 


405,440 


(27,102) 


378,338 



Non-operating revenues 
(expenses): 
Investment income 
Interest expense 
Total non-operating 
revenues (expenses) 



(74,990) 



(74,990) 



43,254 



43,254 



43,254 
(74,990) 



(31,736) 



Other financing sources (uses) 
Operating transfers in 
Operating transfers out 
Stabilization fund contribution 
Total other financing 
sources (uses) 



(210,000) 



(210,000) 



J700) 



iZ00) 



(210,700) 



(210,700) 



Net income 



120,450 



15,452 



135,902 



Retained earnings/fund 
balances, beginning of year 



2, 6 92,65 2 



635, 659 



3.328,3 11 



Retained earnings/fund 
balances, end of year 



2,813,102 $ 



651,111 $ 



3,464,213 



55 



TOWN OF LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS 
PROPRIETARY FUND TYPE AND SIMILAR TRUST FUNDS 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1996 



CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING 
ACTIVITIES: 
Operating income (loss) 
Adjustment to reconcile 
operating income (loss) to net 
cash provided by (used in) 
operating activities: 
Depreciation 

Allowance for doubtful accounts 
Changes in assets and liabilities: 
Increase (decrease) in: 
Accrued interest receivable 
User charges receivable 
Accounts payable and accrued 
liabilities 
Net cash provided by (used in) 
operating activities 
CASH FLOWS FROM CAPITAL 
AND RELATED FINANCING 
ACTIVITIES: 
Operating transfers out 
Interest paid on BAN's 
Acquisition of capital assets 
Bond anticipation note disposition 
Bond anticipation note proceeds 
Net cash used in capital and 
related financing activities 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING 
ACTIVITIES: 
Investment income 
Purchases of securities 
Proceeds from disposition of 
securities 
Net cash provided by (used in) 
investing activities 
INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH 
CASH, beginning of year 
CASH, end of year 



Proprietary 


Fiduciary 




Fund Type 


Fund Type 


Combined 
Totals 


Enterprise 


Nonexpendable 


(Memorandum 


Fund 


Trust Fund 


Only) 


405,440 


$ (27,102) 


$ 378,33! 



87,516 
1,206 



38,310 
( 54,309 ) 



467,663 



1,150 



21,240 



(4712) 



87,516 
1,206 



1,150 
38,310 



462,861 





(210,000) 
(39.000) 
(64.933) 

(975,000) 
915,000 


(700) 


(210,700) 
(39,000) 
(64,933) 

(975,000) 
915,000 




(373,933) 


(700) 


(374,633) 






43,254 
(108,981) 


43,254 
(108,981) 






111,000 


111,000 






45,273 


45,273 




93,730 
744,474 


39,861 
168,777 


133,591 
913,251 


$ 


838,204 $ 


208,638 $ 


1,046,842 



56 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Paul E. Marsh 

William M. Stason 

L. Bruce Long Jr., Chairman 

The Board of Assessors has continued the work of updating our computer systems and 
records. Highlights of this past year include: 

In 1994 the Town of Lincoln adopted Ch. 653 Sec. 40 of the Acts of 1989. This provision 
altered the timing of assessment of new construction to allow the assessors to tax property 
based on the percentage of completion on June 30. This provision became effective in FY 1996. 
The effect of this change was to allow the assessors to value construction based on the 
percentage of completion on June 30 as though it was completed on January 1, 1996. 

The completion of a "full measure and list" for the Town of Lincoln. The Board of 
Assessors hired an appraisal firm during 1996 to update records for all properties in town. Over 
80% of the homes in Lincoln were visited, measurements were taken, features of each property 
were listed, and our records were updated. Many homes had not been visited in over 10 years, 
and there were a great number of changes which resulted. 

The simplification of the assessing map by reducing the number of land classifications 
from the 27 categories developed for the original computer system into 9 categories. The new 
map relies more on lot size and location within the town and not on style of home. 

The Assessors examined several new "value influences", including setback, views, 
wetlands and adjacency to conservation lands. Data was collected for properties with panoramic 
or water views, and this information was applied to the valuations. Further study will continue on 
the other influences including cooperation with the Conservation Commission on wetlands 
issues. 

The Board of Assessors has purchased new computer hardware to improve our analysis 
capabilities. Much of this hardware was purchased to improve ease of use for taxpayer access 
of files. Existing data files are being converted for use with upgraded software. This long 
awaited upgrade will enable the Board to "query" individual data fields and greatly improve our 
analytic capabilities. 

The tax bills for FY 1997 were issued on-time. 

Helen Ryan retired after 10 years of dedicated service to the Town of Lincoln. 

Marcia Nonni joined the professional assessing staff as Administrative Assistant. 



Much work remains to be done: 

In the upcoming year we will be working with the state Department of Revenue in the 
triennial review and recertification of our assessing department. This review of all values in 
Lincoln will require a great deal of work on the part of our professional staff. 

The Board of Assessors will be working with its Assessing Task Force to examine the 
value of sophisticated statistical methodologies for improving correlation between assessed 
values and market prices. This task force held its first meeting in November of 1996 and has 
begun laying the framework for improving our analysis capabilities. 



57 



The task force will begin its work in earnest this winter. We were pleased to find 
residents of Lincoln with superb professional qualifications who were willing to serve on this task 
force. 

We are working with other boards in Lincoln to improve our mapping capabilities, to 
define wetland's boundaries and to help to alleviate the tax burden for our elderly. 

The Board of Assessors maintains the largest database of information about the town. 
We hope to be able to make this database available to the boards and volunteers of Lincoln to 
improve decision making throughout the town. 



58 



Board of Assessors 

Recap of 

Fiscal Year 1997 



Valuation 






Taxable Real Estate 
Personal Property 
Exempt Property 
TOTAL 


$886,185,753 

13,749,750 

147,384,400 

$1,047,319,906 




Appropriations and Assessment 


s 

$16,756,193.77 
234,661.00 
100,000.00 




Town Appropriations 
State and County Charges 
Overlay 
TOTAL 


$17,090,854.77 


Estimated Receipts 






Cherry Sheet Receipts 
Over Estimates Cherry Sheet 
Local Estimated Receipts 
Free Cash 
Available Funds 
TOTAL 


$2,155,169.00 

9,518.00 

1,617,535.92 

940,178.00 

1,092,262.00 


$5,814,662.92 


Net Amount to Raise 




$11,276,191.85 


Taxes for countv. State & Town 






Real Property 
Personal Property 
TOTAL 


$11,103,907.48 
172,284.37 


$11,276,191.85 


Tax Rate $1 2.53 Der $1 .000 




Number of Parcels 






Real Estate 
Personal Property 
Exempt Property 


2,195 
110 
428 





59 



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61 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 



FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Allen Bowles, Chief 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the activity of the Lincoln Police Department for the 
calendar year 1996: 

CRIMINAL ACTIVITY: 

Breaking and Entering 15 

Larcenies 59 

Motor Vehicle Theft 6 

Assault 27 

Forgery 2 

Embezzlement 

Stolen Property 3 

Vandalism 46 

Narcotics Law Violation 7 

Disorderly Conduct 2 

Arrests 85 

Trespass 5 

Civil Matters 15 

Juvenile Matters 69 

Ordinace/Bylaw Violations 14 

Reports of Missing Persons 17 

Domestic Matters 26 

Telephone Disturbance Calls 67 

Reports of Suspicious Activities 89 

General Service Responses 61 

Animal Complaints 8 

Ambulance Calls 68 

Unattended Death Report 4 

Alarms Responded To 825 

Assists to Other Agencies 1 

Restraining Order Services 17 

Reports of Confused Persons 25 

Protective Custody 22 

TRAFFIC ACTIVITIES: 

Operating Under the Influence 23 

Motor Vehicle Complaints 1 04 

Accidents Investigated 157 

Traffic Citations 1,133 



62 



1996 opened with a winter that tested Lincoln, its residents, commuters, 
administration as well as Public Works, the Water Department and Public Safety. 

We emerged in Spring relieved and satisfied that we had successfully dealt with the 
problems created and met the challenge. 

A number of issues have been targeted as being of importance to the department as 
well as the community to include increased training of personnel, vehicle and equipment 
maintenance, and traffic enforcement. 

All police officers attended 40 hours of in-service training sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training Council. Firearms qualification was carried out in 
July and we are appreciative to the Town of Lexington Police Department for the use of their 
range. Line and administrative officers attended courses and seminars dealing with arson, 
domestic violence, juvenile justice, breathalyzer certification, professional development, and 
administrative issues. 

Firefighters, both full-time and call members of the department, continued in their 
pursuit of the Nationally recognized Firefighter I - II rating. Course material presented under 
the direction of the Massachusetts Fire Academy included Live Fire, Structural Fire Fighting, 
Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) and Hose Use and Care. Michael Murphy of the 
Conservation Department updated personnel on the trail system, access issues, and any 
new markings. Additionally, firefighters Frank Gray and Paul Domenichella traveled to 
Maryland and the National Fire Academy for a weekend seminar on Emergency Medical 
Services -- Incident Command. (To date 5 full-time and 2 call firefighters have gained F.F. I - 
II certification, and 1 call firefighter obtained F.F. I certification.) 

Dispatcher Tom Hennessey attended a nationally sponsored program at 
Northeastern University gaining certification in emergency dispatch procedures. All full-time 
dispatch personnel are now E-911 certified and have attended a nationally recognized 
program. Dispatcher Shirley Foley attended Dean College completing a course in sign 
language enabling us to better deal with the hearing impaired community. 

Annual continuing education for EMT certified police officers and firefighters 
continues. Presently ten police officers, nine full-time and eight call firefighters provide 
emergency medical services for the community along with paramedics based at Emerson 
Hospital, available 24 hours a day. 

Engine 3 was returned to service in early December having gone through a 
refurbishment as a part of our capital plan. 

Efforts are presently underway to establish a vehicle maintenance officer within the 
Fire Department to upgrade and maintain a maintenance system coordinating with apparatus 
repair specialists and D.P.W. mechanics. 

In August the Fire Department took delivery of a new ambulance replacing that which 
had provided 1 1 years of service. 

In our efforts to continue our community involvement we have police officers and 
firefighters in the Public School System with the support of Supt. Mark McQuillan and his 
staff. Program presentations include Drug Awareness Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.), 
Teen Dating Violence, and Student Awareness Fire Education (S.A.F.E.). 

As a result of public input and the support from the Board of Selectmen and the 
Traffic Committee, police presence on the roadways has increased. 



63 



This past year the Police and Fire Departments and Town were recipients of a 
variety of grants in support of the D.A.R.E and S.A.F.E. programs, Community Policing, and 
Underground Storage Tank removals at the Fire and Police Facility and Bemis Hall. 

We also benefited from the generosity and good will of others to include Boy Scout 
Troop 127, Cranberry Hill Associates, Inc./Lincoln North, and individual Lincoln Residents 
with in-kind and financial contributions totaling close to $20,000. 

Many changes took place this year in new personnel coming on board. In February 
Michael LeBlanc joined Public Safety as an additional full-time dispatcher coming to us from 
the Stoneham Fire Department. On October 1 st Officer Richard Hallett retired from the 
Police Department after 34 years of service with the department. His position was filled with 
Sean Kennedy formerly with the South Portland Maine Police Dept. and a part-time employee 
with the Town of Lincoln prior to that. 

In August the community was impacted with a serious fire at the Codman 
Community Farms. If it were not for the excellent initial attack by Lincoln Firefighters, the 
response of neighboring communities, as a result of mutual aid requests, the cooperation of 
Codman Community Farm employees and members, the Department of Public Works and 
the Water Department, along with volunteers including residents, contractors and Drumlin 
Farm, the loss could have been greater. The end result was a repairable structure with no 
serious injury or loss of life. 

Closing out the year, effective on December 1 st Captain Richard Goddard was 
promoted to Deputy Chief of the Fire Department to better facilitate the changes and 
administrative demands within the fire service. 

I thank all those who over the year have assisted and cooperated with the Fire and 
Police Departments to include committees, Boards, departments and residents and look 
forward to our continuing partnership. 



64 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the activities of the Lincoln Fire Department for the 
calendar year 1 996: 



Accidents Responded To 


115 


Ambulance Runs 


237 


Ambulance Transports 


198 


Brush Fires 


15 


Building Fires 


21 


False Alarms 


73 


Investigations 


97 


Lock-outs (Vehicle & Property) 


121 


Vehicle Fires 


8 


Mutual Aid Responses 


67 


Reports of Outside Burning 


15 


Special Services 


47 


Water Problems 


2 


Wires Down/Arcing 


47 


Inspections 


148 


Fire Drills 


75 



65 



PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Kenneth Bassett 

Chief Allen Bowles 

Timothy S. Higgins 

Morris Levy 

Hugo Liepmann 

Neil Middleton 

Earl D. Midgley 

David Whalen 

Joseph Robbat, Jr., Chairman 

The Public Safety Building Committee (Committee) completed the design development 
phase of its work in 1996 and, after construction documents were completed in the early fall, 
bids were requested and submitted. 

Unfortunately, the bids came in over budget, and after some discussion, the Selectmen 
agreed to call a special Town Meeting for the night of December 10, 1996. 

At the special Town Meeting, the Selectmen requested a $230,000 transfer from Free 
Cash to partially cover the shortfall. The remaining shortfall, $110,000, will be included in 
appropriate warrant articles at the 1997 Annual Town Meeting. 

The Committee explained at the meeting that the primary causes for the shortfall are 
construction cost escalation greater than anticipated and time delays. 

The special Town Meeting voted in favor of the warrant article and the groundbreaking 
for the project shall begin in late winter of 1997 and be completed in about eighteen months. 



56 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Jane Barnet, Administrative Assistant 
Kenneth A. Desmond, Wiring Inspector 
Russell J. Dixon, Plumbing Inspector 
Earl D. Midgley, Building Inspector 

This year saw much activity in Town. Battle Road Farm is complete and this New 

England "village" is a great addition to Lincoln. DeCordova made major improvements and will 

soon begin the final phase with a new entryway and elevator. 

New residential building starts were down in 1996, but remodeling and additions 
escalated to just over ten and one half million dollars. 

Below are the statistics for 1 996. 

Values as submitted by applicants - 

Building $10,500,850.00 

Plumbing (Residential) 535,565.00 

Electrical (Residential) 422,214.00 

Building permits issued - 

New Residential 7 

Additions and Remodeling 107 

Garages, Sheds, Barns 15 

Swimming Pools 4 

Greenhouses 2 

Re-roofing 48 

Tents (temporary) 21 

Signs 2 

Woodbuming Stoves 10 

Fences 8 

Tennis Courts 

Accessory Apartments 

Total 224 

Plumbing permits issued 173 

Electrical permits issued 1 98 

1996 totals - 

Permit Fees Collected - 
(Residential) 

Building $ 53,386.00 

Plumbing 13,984.00 

Electrical 19,669.00 

Woodbuming Stoves 250.00 

Recertifications 240.00 

Total $ 87,529.00 



67 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Earl D. Midgley 

The General Laws of Massachusetts require that all devices used for weighing or 
measuring commodities be accurately checked and certified by "SEALS" at least once each year. 
These include the scales at Donelan's and the Three S Pharmacy and all the gasoline pumps at 
Doherty's, Tracey's and McCart's. 

For the period commencing January 1, 1996, and ending December 31, 1996, inclusive, 
in compliance with Section 37, Chapter 98, General Laws as amended, the following number of 
devices have been certified: 

Scales sealed 10 

Gasoline pumps sealed 23 

Total 33 

Sealing fees collected 41 9.20 

Scales and gasoline pumps not sealed require repairs or adjustments. 

Any questions regarding weights and measures should be submitted to the Sealer of 
Weights and Measures at the Building Department, telephone 259-2613. 



68 



HEALTH AND WELFARE 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Diane Haessler, R. N. 
Frederick Mansfield, M. D. 
Craig Donaldson, M. D., Chair 

The Board of Health meets the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. and more 
often as needed, with all meetings open to the public. Citizens wishing to be placed on the 
agenda should call Jane Barnet at Town Offices (259-2613) by the Thursday prior to the 
meeting if possible. Septic plans presented for review should be submitted to the Concord 
Board of Health 5 days before the next meeting. 

This year Frank Emmons, agent for the Board, retired and a decision was made not to 
fill the position. Instead, the Town has contracted with the Concord Board of Health for services 
previously provided by Mr. Emmons and John Devine, Sanitarian. Mike Moore and Stan 
Sonsnicki now witness soil tests and review plans for septic systems as well as Sanitarian 
inspections. The Board is very pleased with these arrangements and looks forward to continued 
sharing with our neighboring town. 

Reports of Board Activities: 

1 . Enforcement of Title V of the State Environmental Code: 

The State mandates examinations of sites for sewage and septage disposal, issuance 
of permits, holding hearings, and granting of variances. Summary of activities is as follows: 

Site investigations witnessed (percolation tests and test pits) 67 

Septic system plans reviewed and approved 43 

Installers permits issued 23 

Septage handlers licenses issued 7 



Fees collected by the Board were as follows: 

Soil Test Witnessing $1 0,050.00 

Plan Review 7,200.00 

Disposal Installers Licenses 1,150.00 

Septage Handler Licenses 470.00 

Food Service Permits 185.00 

Total $19,055.00 






69 



2. Sanitarian inspections: 

The Sanitarian helped the Board enforce health regulations according to Chapter X of 
the State Sanitary Code. Regular inspections of food service establishments in Lincoln 
performed during the year, including restaurants and food service facilities in stores, schools, 
institutions, farm stands, as well as several facilities at Hanscom Field. The Codman Pool and 
Bathhouse, and the pool at Bunsai Gakuen College were also inspected periodically by the 
Sanitarian as were the three day camps and Farrington Memorial. Any complaints of possible 
food contamination are also investigated by the Sanitarian. 



3. Flu Clinic: 

Again this year, members of the Board of Health and The School/Town Nurse 
conducted a Flu Clinic, held in October sponsored by the Council on Aging. This year Theresa 
Manning kindly volunteered her nursing services to help administer the inoculations to the 336 
individuals who attended the clinic. Cindy Anthony also provided flu shots to some of Lincoln's 
homebound elderly. A one dollar voluntary contribution was requested of those receiving shots. 

4. School Health Program: 

The School/Town nurse and the two Health Aides continued to play an important role in 
supporting and protecting optimal health at the public school campus. Dr. Stephen Jenkins 
served ably as school physician and Cindy Anthony has continued her active involvement in 
health teaching. 



The school health personnel are as follows: 

Cynthia Anthony, R.N., School/Town Nurse 

Anne Marie Mahoney, School Health Aide 

Laurel DiMatteo, School Health Aide 

Stephen Jenkins, M.D., School Physician 

5. Summary of Eliot Community Mental Health Center Activities: 

This facility provides services to Lincoln residents and includes an outpatient clinic, 
geriatric, mental retardation, and therapeutic preschool programs. In 1996 there were 296 
direct service contacts for Lincoln residents. Nine towns participate in funding these services 
and Lincoln's contribution to the Mental Health Center in 1996 was $5,000. 



70 



6. Report of the East Middles Mosquito Control Project: 

The East Middles Mosquito Control Project conducts a program in Lincoln consisting of 
mosquito and wetland serveillance, water management and public education. Lincoln's cost for 
the Project in 1996 was $8,520. 

The goal of the surveillance program is to target mosquito breeding areas and to 
monitor changes in the adult mosquito population with particular regard to possible emergence 
of equine encephalitis. Three sites in Lincoln are monitored and held to determine the need for 
control.These sites are behind 58 Conant Road, 80 Tower Road below the Tower Road Well, 
and Mackintosh Lane by the pipeline. 

Frank Emmons was the Board's representative to the Project and, upon his retirement, 
Dr. Mansfield assumed this responsibility. 

7. Summary of Animal Inspector's Activities: 

One of the Animal Inspector's responsibilities is to supply the Massachusetts 
Department of Food and Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Health and Dairying, with a list of animal 
owners, the number of livestock, and general health of animals in town. 



8. A compilation of the 1 996 animal census is as follows: 

Number of Dairy Herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 



Number of Beef Herds ( " 
Number of Swine Herds ( 
Number of Horses 
Number of Ponies 
Number of Donkeys 
Number of Mules 
Number of Sheep 
Number of Goats 
Number of Llamas 
Number of Poultry 
Number of Peacocks 



") 



16 

32 

35 

77 

12 

1 

2 

105 

12 

10 

384 

3 



71 



Any dog known to have bitten a person must, by law, be quarantined for a period of 10 
days in order to be observed for signs of rabies, and the findings thereof sent to the State 
Bureau of Animal Health and Dairying where they are kept on file for 7 years. 

Out-of-state cattle entering Massachusetts must have their ear tag numbers recorded 
and forwarded to the State. If complaints arise with regard to the health of any livestock, the 
Animal Inspector investigates the circumstances in accordance with laws and regulations 
relating to animal health. This has happened but once in the past 13 years. 

9. Recycling and Hazardous Waste: 

There was a household hazardous waste day on June 15, 1996 at the D.P.W. yard at 
which 275 households were served at this collection. By State mandate, the Board is 
responsible for maintenance of proper sanitation at the Transfer Station and must monitor each 
category of materials being recycled. The Board strongly supports efforts to enhance recycling. 



72 



LINCOLN COUNCIL ON AGING 

John Caswell 

Marian Cook 

Jackie Gavin 

Allan Greaves 

BGrim 

Russ Mahan, Vice Chair 

Ruth I. Morey 

Marilyn O'Rourke 

Julie Pugh, Secretary/ Treasurer 

Jane Tatlock 

Wendy Palu 

Albert M. Avery III, Chairperson 

Elaine Bloom, Director 
Liz King, Assistant Director 

The Council on Aging enriches the life of the more than 1,100 Lincoln residents who are 
age 60 or over by providing ongoing activities and programs. Assistance is also available for 
problem solving or for resources information, so that senior citizens will find it possible to enjoy 
more years of independent living in their own homes. In addition Council on Aging resources are 
also available to any Lincoln resident looking for assistance or information to help their parents or 
another elderly resident both in the area or nation wide. It is the responsibility of the Council on 
Aging to: 

Identify the total needs of Lincoln elders; 

Enlist support and participation to meet these needs; 

Design, advocate for and/or implement services to fill these needs; 

Coordinate with area agencies on aging and be cognizant of state and federal 
legislation and programs regarding the elderly. 



Each month a newsletter, sent to every residence in Lincoln, lists the activities and 
programs for that month, as well as other pertinent information. Ongoing activities include 
Bowling each Monday at the Wal-Lex Lanes in Waltham and Fit For Life, the senior weight lifting 
program. Bridge enthusiasts play twice weekly while periodic classes help sharpen their skills. 
Line Dancing led by Dot Manzelli, assisted by her husband John, keeps Lincoln seniors on their 
toes. Monthly movies entertain and inform. 

Programs included a fascinating program on "Eclipses" presented by Chris Halas, a 
lecture and slides on the Winslow Homer Exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts followed by a trip to 
see the exhibit, and an off-the-cuff chat with Representative Jay Kaufman. Documentary film 
maker Debbie Dorsey told us about documentaries and her interest in filming the 4 th of July 
Parade. Jackie Parker shared slides and stories of her travels to Turkey. Bruce and Helen Bare 
took us on the first part of a journey to New Zealand, "Pacific Paradise". Elaine Burnham brought 
dolls, recently back from exhibition in Washington, and told us the fascinating story of slave 
Harriet Ann Jacobs, who made them. Lincoln attorney John Valpey discussed Basic Estate 
Planning. The Garden Club invited us to their meeting to hear Lincoln Tree Warden Ken Bassett 
and the Lincoln Sudbury High School Key Club invited the seniors to a traditional Thanksgiving 



73 



dinner. In addition everyone enjoyed the annual Strawberry Ice Cream Social and a Holiday 
Party that included a senior, Jeopardy-like, game show. 

Brooks teachers Joan Yarro and Lynda Meenan received a grant from the Lexington 
Schools Foundation and created a program that caused great excitement and a long waiting list. 
They requested and received funds to provide an Intergenerational Computer Program to teach 
seniors basic computer skills. A grant from the Executive Office of Elder Affairs allowed the COA 
to purchase a computer for senior practice at Bemis Hall. Seniors "went to school" on Mondays, 
where Brooks middle school students acted as tutors. Not only did the seniors learn beginning 
word processing, but some very special relationships developed between the seniors and their 
student tutors. 

Programs also included ways to stay healthy, both physically and mentally. Mary Kitses 
offered a Bereavement Support Group that meets once a month. The Pierce Fund funded 
monthly Blood Pressure Clinics and, along with the Friends of the COA, Podiatry Clinics. The 
Lincoln Health Department gave flu shots at a well attended clinic. Other health related 
programs included: "Safety in the Home", presented by the Department of Public Health; "How to 
Relax and Manage Stress"; "Managing Arthritis"; and "Living with Hearing Loss", which included 
hearing screenings. Lincoln senior men were invited to a "Morning of Health" at the Lexington 
Club. A grant from the Executive Office of Elder Affairs provided money for transportation to 
doctor and dentist appointments. 

Trip planners Allan Greaves, Marilyn O'Rourke and Jane Tatlock took us see shows at 
the Merrimack Repertory Theater and Concord Players. We attended the Big Apple Circus and a 
St. Patrick's Day Party complete with corned beef and cabbage. We journeyed to the Tower Hill 
Botanical Gardens, the Port of Galilee, Rhode Island for a boat ride, Lowell Historic Park, 
Tanglewood, a train ride through the Vermont fall foliage, Foxwood and the State House for lunch 
and a very special tour with Rep. Jay Kaufman. We also enjoyed tea and a tour of Newbury 
Court and a nostalgic trip to Waltham to visit the Girl Scout Camp and Museum. 

Lincoln seniors were involved in helping others. They acted as hostesses for two days to 
support a fund raiser Show Home for Minuteman Home Care. A talented group meets on 
Fridays and has made dozens of hand puppets. These are given to the Children's Ward at 
Emerson Hospital. Peg Carmen coordinates that project. Others were "Reading Partners" with 
first graders in Marie Crispen's Class. Ellen Raja coordinated a project where, on Mondays, 
seniors wound countless balls of yarn which were sent to women in refugee camps in the area 
formerly known as Yugoslavia. They used the yarn to knit into clothing for their use or for sale. 
Closer to home, volunteers played a very important role in all Council on Aging activities. They 
served as Board members and Friends of the Council on Aging, Meals-On-Wheels and LINC 
drivers, collators and speakers. They were hosts and hostesses and teachers and they worked 
at the health clinics. In all, 123 volunteers gave over 5,000 hours of their time, talents and 
enthusiasm to support Lincoln seniors and we thank them. 

The Lincoln Cultural Council, a local agency of the Massachusetts Cultural Council, gave 
the Council on Aging a grant that allowed us to hang art at the Lincoln Artists' Gallery at Bemis 
Hall. The Gallery, founded two years ago to give local artists a place to exhibit their work, had 
outstanding exhibits in 1996 including photographs titled "People Without Faces" by Joseph 
Sussman, watercolors of Lincoln by Ted Tucker, acrylic watercolors by Sally Chandler, 
photographs by Ruth Barbarow and "Scenes of Lincoln" by Ruth Barbarow, and Fabric Art by 
Dilla GOOCH Tingley. Art by the students of Susan Richards Hallstein from the Brooks Middle 
School was also on display. Most of the artists had the opportunity to discuss their work at a 
"Coffee & Conversation". Ruth Barbarow, Sally Chandler, and Marian Cook organized the 
Gallery. 



74 



Several Lincoln seniors received special recognition. In March, Grace Downing was 
given the Boston Post Cane at Town Meeting, recognizing her as Lincoln's oldest resident. The 
Selectmen also presented her with flowers and a plaque calligraphied by Mandy Young. In 
September Dorothy and John Manzelli were presented with the Community Leadership Award at 
the Minuteman Home Care Annual Meeting. They were recognized for their countless 
contributions to the Council on Aging, Lincoln seniors and the community. 

The Council on Aging offers many other services. SHINE (Serving Health Information 
Needs of Elders) Counselor Al Avery helped seniors sort out problems and offered information 
about health and long term care insurance and other health insurance related issues. We are all 
pleased to welcome newly trained SHINE Counselors John Caswell and Julie Pugh. Al Avery 
and Julie Pugh also offered assistance with tax preparation, both state and federal. In addition 
the COA was the local place to apply for Fuel Assistance, the Town Emergency Fund and the 
Globe Santa Fund. 

We are thoroughly enjoying our newly designed quarters. Thanks to the efforts of many 
people we were able to accomplish our goals at very little cost. Many volunteers worked at every 
level of the planning. We are especially grateful to Lincoln Architect Dick Reese who turned the 
existing space into a much more pleasant and usable floor plan and designer Vandy Savage who 
is sharing her expertise to make it beautiful. 

The Council on Aging is very fortunate to have an active and supportive group of 
"Friends" who support the Council in many ways. The following served as members of the Board 
of the Friends of the Lincoln Council on Aging: 

Catherine Bronson, Treasurer 

Priscilla Damon 

Barbara Davis 

Peg Elliott 

Natalie Faddoul 

Bill Grim 

Judy Gross 

Cynthia Moller 

Bill Monroe 

Claire Permain 

Cynthia Ritsher 

Jane Tatlock 

Nancy Wood, Clerk 

Elizabeth Snelling, President 

The Friends of the Council on Aging hosted the gala 'Top of the Town" holiday party for 
residents 65 and over and in the spring recognized the many volunteers who contributed to the 
COA with a 'Thank You" luncheon. They also sponsored the Thanksgiving and Christmas 
Dinners given by Barbara Davis and her family. Funding from the Friends assisted with trips, 
Podiatry Clinics and publications and in the renovation and furnishing of the COA space. The 
LINC, a volunteer driving program, coordinated by the Friends, provided rides for seniors to 
Bemis Hall, the library, medical appointments and for shopping and errands. We thank the 
Friends and the many Lincoln residents and businesses who have supported the Council on 
Aging through their contributions to the Friends. 



75 



MINUTEMAN HOME CARE (MHC) 

Wendy L. Palu-Kusik, President and Board Member 
John Caswell, Member-at-Large 

Minuteman Home Care (MHC) is a non-profit social service agency which assists 
persons 60 years and older to live as independently in their own homes and communities. The 
bulk of the Minuteman Home Care budget comes from State and Federal government funding 
sources. 

The State Home Care Program provides services such as case management, 
homemaking, chores, transportation, respite care for care givers and some administrative 
expenses. In addition MHC provides protective services, eating together programs, information 
and referral, senior aides, alzheimer services, nursing home prescreening, companion care and 
money management programs. 

Title lll-B and Title lll-C of the Older Americans Acts provides federal funding for 
congregate care meals and home-delivered meals programs, legal services transportation 
services, and innovative community projects. 

A portion of the MHC budget comes from sixteen member communities and private 
donations. These contributions are a critical part of the agency's support. Through payment of 
an annual "local share" Lincoln is entitled to be represented on the policy setting Board of 
Members of Minuteman Home Care which administers the services. The Board consists of 
twenty members and eight members-at-large. During the 1996 fiscal year the local share 
assessed to the Town of Lincoln is $995.00. Local shares are assessed to each community on a 
formula based on the number of people 60 years of age and older living in the community. In 
Fiscal year 1996 Lincoln received $45,929 in services from MHC who served 114 clients in 
Lincoln. 

Lincoln's participation through the appointed board member to Minuteman Home Care 
and its "local share" is vital to the continued success of Minuteman Home Card and provision of 
needed services to the elders in our region. 



76 



DOG OFFICER 

In March 1990, the Lincoln Board of Selectmen entered into a contract with Mr. Leslie 
Boardman to provide 24 hours/day, 365 days/year dog officer services to the Town. The Dog 
Officer, or his agent, can be reached by calling the business telephone at the police station (259- 
8113). The dispatchers record all calls for the Dog Officer and the Dog Officer then picks up 
these messages each evening. Non-emergency callers can expect a return call within the next 
day. If the call is an emergency, the Dog Officer will be paged for an immediate response. 

After seven years, Mr. Boardman is still the Dog Officer, and the program continues to 
run smoothly. It is clear that this would not be the case without the ongoing cooperation of the 
dispatchers and the Chief of Police. The Selectmen would also like to thank Mr. Boardman for 
his ongoing efforts. 

The Town of Lincoln held a Rabies Clinic this year, on May 11,1 996 for both cats and 
dogs. 

Activity for 1996 Included: 

Number of Calls Received: 272 

Number of Dogs Impounded: 9 

Licensed: 4 

Not Licensed: 5 

Dogs Sent to Lowell Humane Society: 

Dog Bites Reported: 7 

Cat Bites Reported: 

A reminder: Dog owners must license their dogs by January 1 st of each year. Owners 
not licensing their dogs by April 1 st will have $5.00 fine added to the regular licensing fee. 
Licensing fees are as follows: 

Male/Female $10.00 
Spayed/Neutered 6.00 

Kennel License 25.00 (up to 4 dogs) 

Kennel License 50.00 (up to 10 dogs) 

Please remember, licenses make all the difference when trying to return a lost dog to its 
owner. 






77 



NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE (NESWC) 

Timothy S. Higgins, Executive Secretary/Acting Representative 

This past year has been an active one for the NESWC Board of Directors, with re- 
negotiation of the town's long term contract for solid waste disposal as our primary focus. 

History : 

In 1985, Lincoln joined with twenty-two other communities in helping to finance the 
construction of a "trash-to-energy" plant that would generate electricity by burning trash. At the 
time, given the Commonwealth's stated intent to close municipal landfills and during a time of 
rapidly escalating energy prices, participation in NESWC was assumed to be a cost effective 
strategy. The towns entered into an agreement with Wheelabrator Technologies, Inc. to 
construct, operate and own the plant. Thus far, the assumptions regarding state regulations and 
energy prices have not proven out, resulting in a considerable financial burden: NESWC towns 
currently pay nearly double the spot market rate for trash disposal. Further, over the next eight 
years, the combination of back loaded debt repayments and federally mandated investments in 
air pollution control equipment will again double our costs. 

Current Negotiations: 

Negotiations have been ongoing between the twenty-three NESWC towns and 
Wheelabrator Technologies, Inc. The existing contract makes the towns responsible for the 
expense of operating the facility. In turn, we "enjoy" the benefits of most of the income 
generated. NESWC has attempted to negotiate alternatives that would transfer the economic 
risks and rewards to Wheelabrator. Two alternative models have emerged, neither of which has 
yet been translated into a final contract document: one requires the towns to extend the term for 
an additional ten years-the other does not. We continue to participate in the discussions, and 
look forward to the opportunity to consider these alternatives when NESWC and Wheelabrator 
have concluded their negotiations. 

In September Mr. C. Russel Hansen stepped down as the town's representative to the 
NESWC board - a service he has ably performed since 1993. Russ ensured that the town's 
interests were represented while the project bonds were re-financed, a new management team 
was installed, and throughout several attempts to restructure the contract with Wheelabrator. 
Russ has continued to make himself available to help evaluate changing conditions. 



78 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

John H.L. Bingham 
Dorothy Brennan 
Wesley Frost 
Hugo Liepmann 
Gwyn Loud 

Recycling efforts by conscientious residents have resulted in ninety-one thousand and 
ninety-seven dollars ($91,097) of savings for Lincoln in 1996. At Town Meeting the Recycling 
Committee will present an article asking for money to redesign the transfer station area to make 
recycling faster and more convenient for residents. Gridlock has at times prevailed in front of the 
paper bin with the present layout. 

Lincoln now recycles numbered plastics, cardboard, newspapers, mixed paper, glass 
containers (thanks to the glass volunteers and to Lynn Donaldson for organizing them), cans, 
scrap metal, appliances, and button batteries. The swap table has been a great success for the 
re-use and exchange of useful articles. 

You can get recycling information in several ways: 

• There will be a town-wide mailing of an updated recycling brochure in April. Please post it 
on your refrigerator. 

• Thanks to the Mass Audubon Society, you can also dial RECYCLE (732-9253), for 
information on Transfer Station hours and an update on the materials we recycle. 

• Watch "Michael Recycle" in the Lincoln Journal for great recycling ideas and the week's glass 
volunteers. Their good efforts are helping the town save money. 

Thanks to a state grant, compost bins are available at the Town Offices for half price. 
Call 259-2600 for more information. 

Blythe Robinson, Assistant Executive Secretary, deserves a special thanks for her 
dedicated seeking out of the best prices for recycled materials in a time when the market for 
them is in a cyclical decline, as well as for her excellent handling of all details of the recycling 
program. 

The Committee wishes to thank all recyclers, and especially the glass volunteers, for a 
good year of recycling. We have done well. If everyone in town recycles all they can, we can 
surely do even better. 



79 



PLANNING & PUBLIC WORKS 

PLANNING BOARD 

E. Crawley Cooper 

M. Palmer Faran 

Alex MacLean 

Dilla G. Tingley 

James B. White, Chairman 

The Planning Board remains committed to the planning goals established years ago to 
promote and retain the unique cultural, historic and rural aesthetic which is so essential to 
Lincoln's character. Through the use of its creativity and stamina as well as its bylaws and 
regulations, the Planning Board is empowered to ensure that each roadway, subdivision, and 
commercial proposal which comes before it will have the minimum adverse impact on Lincoln's 
character, traffic, and the environment. 

Early in 1996, the Planning Board considered several zoning and general bylaw changes 
which were placed on the warrant for the Annual town meeting. A proposal to expand the North 
Lincoln Planning District (and consequently add industrial/commercial space in that area) was not 
endorsed by the Planning Board. The land proposed for that development is owned by 
MASSPORT and the Planning Board does not favor expanded office development in this area. 

The Warrant also included changes to the zoning and general bylaws to enhance and 
clarify bylaws pertaining to public way access permits and zoning regulations for non-profit, 
religious, or educational structures. This allows board review of expansions to the various 
institutions in town and evaluation of their impacts on traffic, safety or the general purpose of the 
bylaw. The Board also discussed and reviewed a proposed change to the zoning bylaw dealing 
with non-conforming structures and uses. Extensive discussion during public hearings caused 
the Board to withdraw this article and set up a specific task force (Zoning Study Committee) 
chaired by Board member Crawley Cooper. The final report of this committee is near 
completion. 

The Board finalized site plan reviews on three out of four home sites located on Sweet 
Bay Lane. The Board approved a two lot cluster subdivision on Old County Road, while retaining 
a significant portion of the original eight acre parcel as open space. New plans for changes to 
existing cluster home sites were also reviewed as required. Discussion on potential subdivision 
proposals were carried on while several ANR (Approval Not Required) plans were approved 
during the course of the year. 

The Board conducted site plan reviews of several properties. Among these were several 
pre-existing non-conforming uses at 110 Concord Road and 339 South Great Road, as well as 
the proposed public safety building on Lincoln Road. The Board also conducted hearings on sign 
changes, accessory apartment applications, and changes in use as required in the Zoning Bylaw. 
In following these guidelines, the Board is able to work closely with all applicants towards 
maintaining the character and rural aesthetic of the Town. 

Regional issues continued to take up much of the Board's time and interest. Crosby's 
Corner on the border of Lincoln and Concord has long been acknowledged as a dangerous 
intersection. The Route 2 Corridor Advisory Committee (CAC) continues to work with the 
Massachusetts Highway Department (MHD) on improvements along Route 2. All three towns on 
the committee, Lincoln, Concord and Acton, have agreed that Crosby's Corner is the first priority 
for improvement. The probable upgrade of Route 2 from Bedford Road through Crosby's Corner 



80 



has caused the Planning Board to initiate neighborhood input regarding impact to the abutting 
neighborhood's and mitigation methods to lessen those impacts. Much creative thought and 
energy has caused good results. The MHD has listened and responded to these neighborhood 
concerns during these early stages of the process by agreeing to study different alternatives. 

The HATS Committee (consisting of Selectmen and Planning Board members of the four 
communities surrounding Hanscom Field) has worked and communicated in order to become an 
integral part of the Generic Environmental Impact Review currently underway by MASSPORT, 
which controls the land in and around the airfield. Through HATS' efforts, each town is now 
contributing commentary to the environmental review as it is being written. The four towns have 
also hired a planning consultant to work through the issues of a planning concept and process 
which all the communities can support, including MASSPORT and the Minute Man National 
Historical Park. The Planning Board looks forward to working on this regional effort. 

Lincoln is also an active member of MAGIC (Minuteman Advisory Group on Interlocal 
Coordination), a regional sub-group of the MAPC (Metropolitan Area Planning Council). This 
group of towns extending from Lincoln to Route 495 deals with regional issues such as 
transportation, growth, and economic impacts. Lincoln also has representation on the 
Cambridge Watershed Advisory Commission, a regional group made up of the City of 
Cambridge and communities which surround the Cambridge Watershed. 

The Planning Board has been actively involved with the development of roadside paths in 
Lincoln. Two neighborhood groups have come forward with proposals for roadside paths. The 
first is a path along Bedford Road between Route 2 and Route 2A. This path was included in a 
priority list of the Bedford Roadside Path Committee in 1986. The Board looks forward to this 
being constructed in 1997, and trusts that it will serve as a vital link between North Lincoln, the 
Minute Man National Historical Park, and the rest of the community. The second roadside path 
under consideration for the near future is a continuation of the roadside path along Route 117 
from the junction of Route 126 to the Mount Misery Conservation area. The Board supports the 
concept of roadside paths which provide linkage between neighborhoods and alternative 
transportation modes. 

On other local planning issues, the Planning Board has been working with the Selectmen 
to find a viable way for the Post Office to remain at its Lincoln Mall location. The Post Office has 
expressed a desire to expand or leave this location due to their needs for more space and 
adequate loading docks. The Board would like to see the Post Office remain at this commercial 
center of town and will work towards this goal. Members of the Board also actively participate 
on the Roadway Planning Committee and the Historic District Commission as part of their 
commitment to long term planning goals. 

During the course of the year, Board member Tom Wang resigned due to travel and 
work commitments. The Selectmen and the Planning Board jointly appointed Alex MacLean to 
fill the unexpired term. While the Board will miss the vision and skills that Mr. Wang brought with 
him as a landscape architect, the Board welcomes new member Alex MacLean, an aerial 
photographer who will add a special dimension and "overview" to the Board meetings. 



81 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Despena F. Billings 
Buckner Creel 
Peter Guldberg 
Amalie Kass 
B. Braun, Chairman 

Pamela Green, Associate Member 
Susan Hall Mygatt, Associate Member 

There were three changes in the membership of the Board in 1996. David Ries resigned 
and Buckner Creel was appointed by the Selectmen to take his place. They also appointed 
Pamela Green as an Associate Member of the Board 

We extend, as always, our deepest and heartiest thanks to Nancy Zuelke, our Secretary. 

Our Report to the Town for 1995 discussed two matters in the Board's file of unfinished 
business, namely a proposed house on Davison Drive, and an appeal to the courts regarding the 
gasoline station on Concord Road. We had hoped both these matters would be resolved in 
1996, but they were not. The parties involved in Davison Drive have been communicating with 
each other. We hope that 1997 brings their agreement, as well as resolution in both these 
matters. 

There were 10 applications filed, 10 hearings scheduled, 17 renewals published during 
1996 as follows: 

January 23 - MICHAEL & JANET FRAZIER, 1 8 GRANVILLE ROAD special 

permit for accessory apartment. GRANTED 

April 9 - NEIL FEINBERG appeal of Building Inspector decision regarding 

enforcement action on property at 1 10 CONCORD ROAD 
owned by ROBERT D. MCCART UPHOLD DECISION 

- THE F. PANETTA TRUST #1 , 279 CAMBRIDGE TPKE 

special permit for addition on non-conforming structure GRANTED 

April 1 6 - ELIZABETH & JAMES WILKINSON, 1 08 CONCORD ROAD 

special permit for addition on non-conforming structure GRANTED 

- BRUCE NICKERSON special permit for tenants GARY & 
VIRGINIA BARBATI to employ additional persons in a 

sign company at 273 SOUTH GREAT ROAD GRANTED 

October 15 - ANTHONY MRUGALA, 72 CAMBRIDGE TPKE. renew 

special permit for hay and sleigh ridges GRANTED 

- BRUCE HUNTER REALTY TRUST for a special permit for 

surveying business at 1 LEWIS STREET. GRANTED 

October 29 - LEXINGTON COUNCIL ON AGING/MINUTEMAN 

VOCATIONAL SCHOOL special permit for senior day care 

center at 22 MILL STREET GRANTED 

November 12 - SEJFI PROTOPAPA special permit for clothing crafts specialty 

store at 2 LEWIS STREET GRANTED 

- BRUCE & ROY MACDOWELL special permit to demolish 
an existing non-conforming structure and construct a new 
structure at 339 SOUTH GREAT ROAD WITHDRAWN 



82 



RENEWALS: 

Paula Bennett, 10 Beaver Pond Road - Apartment 

John Braasch, 56 Sandy Pond Road - Apartment 

Builders' Club of Lincoln, Inc. 181 Lincoln Road - charitable institution 

Walter Burke, Cambridge Tpke. - Apartment 

Thomas Diab, 22 Deer Run Road - Apartment 

Doherty's Garage, Inc., Lincoln Road - restaurant 

Neil Feinberg, 104 Concord Road - Apartment 

Sylvia Golden, 15 Old Sudbury Road - Apartment 

John Gummere, 15 Lewis Street - tree service business 

Oliver Hayes, 261 Concord Road - Apartment 

Fred Hopengarten, 6 Willarch Road - radio tower 

Lincoln Housing Commission, Codman Road - Apartment 

Paul Marsh, Bedford Road - Apartment 

Nathalie Miller, Old County Road - Apartment 

Marcia Roehr, Old Concord Road - Apartment 

Wilfried Schmid, 21 Silver hill Road - Apartment 

Bella Wheeler, 14 Old Cambridge Tpke. - Apartment 



83 



CAPITAL PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Mary Cancian 
Doug Harding 
Tim Higgins 
Suzanne Marchand 
Patti Salem 
Al Schmertzler 
Ed Schwartz 
Peter Sugar 
Joe Sussman 

Background: 

On August 20 th the Moderator convened the initial meeting of the Capital Planning 
Committee. The meeting was dedicated to reviewing and clarifying the charge, discussing and 
outlining a process, and reaching agreement on a time table. By the end of September, 
departments had updated their inventories of capital assets and had prioritized their project 
requests for fiscal years 98 - 2002. A series of three evening meetings were conducted in mid- 
October to provide the various departments, boards and committees the opportunity to present 
and support their requests, and to assist the Committee in gaining an understanding of the 
various projects. Our report was presented on November 1 st . In early December our 
recommendations were revised to address a budget shortfall in the public safety building 
construction account. At the time this report was submitted the Selectmen and Finance 
Committee were still formulating their respective positions for town meeting. 

Objective: 

Our intent is to (1) help the town predict and plan for significant, non-recurring 
expenditures for capital equipment and projects - for a five year time frame (2) serve as a 
sounding board for project proponents to ensure that proposals that go before town meeting are 
thoughtful and complete, and that alternative strategies for meeting a given need have been 
carefully considered, and (3) to weigh the relative need, timing, and impact each project will 
have on the financial position of the town. 

Scope / Definition of Capital Item: 

Generally, we've considered all tangible assets with a useful life of at least five (5) years, 
valued at $15,000 or more. This definition captures cars, trucks, fire engines, equipment 
(including data processing), infrastructure (roads, paths, drainage, etc), major building 
alterations, and new construction. We stretched the definition to incorporate planning studies 
and design services that are intended to result in a future request for funding in excess of 
$15,000. 

Items not considered: 

• capital items valued at between $1,000 - $4,999, which will appear under the 
heading of "Capital Outlay" in the respective operating budget of the department; 

• capital items or projects estimated to cost between $5,000 - $14,999, will appear, so 
far as we understand the intentions of the Selectmen and Finance Committee, as 
separate warrant articles; 

• routine building maintenance - addressed through the town-wide building 
maintenance article; and 



84 



• Water Department and Pierce House requests - given that they are financially self- 
sustaining. 

FY-98 Recommendations: 

In the aggregate, requests for capital projects for FY-98 totaled $1,425,000. We have 
recommended to the Selectmen and the Finance Committee that they defer consideration of 
several projects and support a total budget of $1,095,000. Included among our 
recommendations are: 

• $232,000 for replacement vehicles (Public Safety, Public Works and Conservation) 

• $156,000 for data processing equipment and applications - including $75,000 to equip 

the new public safety building 

• $135,000 for phase II of the ballfield improvement program, and 

• $140,000 to construct a roadside path on Bedford Road, north of Route 2 

The entire text of our report is available at the Town Offices. 

FYs 99 - 2002: Outlook: 

We appreciate the thorough and careful attention town departments, boards, and 
committees gave in attempting to predict their capital needs through the year 2002. Despite 
their diligence, unanticipated needs will arise, town priorities will change, as will the town's 
financial position. Notwithstanding these uncertainties, it seems reasonable - for the purpose of 
long-range forecasting - to assume an annual capital investment of $600,000 - $800,000. In this 
regard, our recommendation supports the assumptions underlying the town's current forecast. 



85 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Roger Bergen 

Doug Harding 

Addie Kim 

Tara Tracy 

Tom Walker 

Jona Donaldson, Chair 

So the salamanders were a little sluggish! Despite the much anticipated, yet decidedly 
disappointing amphibian migration, 1996 was a year of many successes for the Conservation 
Commission. Open Space preservation, wetlands protection and education, and wildlife 
management continued to be top priorities for the Commission. 

The year brought additional changes in membership to the board. The Commission lost 
the invaluable services of Peter Conrad, who has bid a fond farewell for a year's sabbatical dining 
on tea and crumpets in London, England. Mr. Conrad's broad perspective and keen insight into 
difficult conservation issues were great assets for the Commission. In addition Mr. Conrad's 
unique sense of humor, particularly his ability to make any sentence "punny", will be sorely 
missed. On a brighter note, the Commission welcomes Mr. Doug Harding to the Board. Mr. 
Harding's leadership skills and broad knowledge of town issues are a great addition to the 
Commission. 

PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION 

Staffing : The Commission continues to benefit from the hard work and dedication of its 
staff which includes Mike Murphy, Conservation Land Manager; Geoff McGean; Conservation 
Administrator, and Carol Padden, Chief Ranger. 

Open Space Activities : The Commission continues to work towards protecting important 
land parcels in Town as prioritized by Lincoln's Open Space Plan. With the lack of available 
public funds for land purchase, the Commission is focusing much of its efforts on working with 
generous landowners who might be interested in conserving their lands through a Conservation 
Restriction (CR). A CR can permanently protect a property in its natural state while still allowing 
landowners to enjoy their land and, in many cases, receive a significant tax savings. 

As part of its open space activities, the Commission has initiated efforts to update its 
Open Space Plan. The Plan will help focus the town's conservation priorities for the next several 
years and also help guide future strategies for land management. 

Wetlands : The Commission and the Conservation Administrator continue to respond to 
the numerous requests for information by residents and developers regarding construction and 
other activities in and near wetlands. Lincoln's numerous wetlands function to provide important 
public benefits, including pollution attenuation, flood control, protection of water supplies, storm 
damage prevention, and wildlife habitat. The Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the 
Town's Wetlands Protection Bylaw provide the regulatory framework within which the* 
Commission works to protect these important functions and values of Lincoln's wetlands. 

Through this framework, the Commission and its Administrator conduct site visits, guide 
residents through the permit process, review permit applications, and conduct meetings and 
hearings with applicants to ensure that a proposed project will not adversely affect wetlands. In 
most cases, the Commission requires that specific conditions be followed by an applicant for 
construction within 100 feet of wetlands. The Commission ensures that these conditions are 
satisfied during construction through regular site inspections. Over the past year, the 



86 



Commission held 43 public meetings and hearings to discuss and review projects near wetlands. 
These include new house construction, house additions, pond maintenance activities, and 
several federal, state and municipal projects. 

In order to facilitate a more proactive approach to wetlands protection in Town, the 
Commission is continuing to develop an educational outreach program. The Commission is 
creating a pamphlet which teaches landowners the importance and benefits of wetlands, the 
regulatory process for undertaking projects near wetlands, and how to become a "good neighbor" 
to a wetland. 

Farmland : As part of its stewardship role, the Commission works to ensure that sound 
agricultural practices are followed on all Town-owned conservation lands which are leased to 
farmers. The Commission encourages rotation of crops, careful pesticide and fertilizer use, 
planting of cover crops, and annual soil monitoring to help maintain land productivity. In addition, 
with the development of its farmland/wildlife policy, the Commission encourages farmers to 
always consider agricultural practices which are least invasive to wildlife. 

A new lease was awarded this year to the Food Project on the remaining 4 acre parcel of 
the Codman North field. Currently, there are seven farmers leasing 180 acres of farmland from 
the Town. Revenue generated from the lease agreements totals $4,191 per year. 

Wildlife : The Commission continues its efforts toward inventorying and protecting the 
numerous species of wildlife that are dependent on Lincoln's conservation lands for their 
habitats. Through the hard work and efforts of the Wildlife Advisory Committee (WAC), a group 
of wildlife experts who serve as an advisory resource for the Commission and the Lincoln Land 
Conservation Trust (LLCT), numerous wildlife projects were initiated during the year. These 
projects included planting a portion of the Smith Andover Field with native wildflowers, 
experimenting with techniques to reduce exotic and invasive plant species, monitoring of 
grassland bird populations, assisting with ongoing wildlife inventory projects, and continuing the 
very successful wildlife sightings column in the Lincoln Journal. 

The WAC also helped organize over 130 volunteers who eagerly signed up to assist with 
the annual salamander and frog migration across some of Lincoln's well traveled roads. 
Unfortunately, due to very unfavorable weather conditions, (i.e. heavy snow and no warm, rainy 
nights), the amphibian migration in March and early April was very sporadic. Volunteers continue 
to assist in identifying additional vernal pools in Town, temporary bodies of water where certain 
amphibians conduct their breeding activities. 

In consultation with the Commission and the LLCT, a Pond Committee was also 
established to assist in initiating an inventory of ponds throughout the Town. Working with an 
intern hired by the LLCT and Conservation Commission rangers, the Committee established an 
inventory protocol and assisted with both mapping and field work activities. The goal of the pond 
inventory project is to begin to increase the Town's understanding of its ponds, their overall 
health, the habitats that they provide, and the uses that they support. 

The Commission, LLCT, Wildlife Advisory Committee, and Pond Committee hope to gain 
more information over the coming years to better protect wildlife habitat on conservation lands 
and throughout Town, as well as to encourage residents to assist with the many ongoing 
inventory, research, and protection projects. 

Ranger Program : The Conservation Ranger program provides valuable sources of 
education and public safety on conservation land. With over 50,000 hikers, bikers, equestrians 
and skiers using 2,000+ acres of conservation land during the year, the uniformed presence of 
Conservation Rangers remains an essential service to the Town. 



87 



Chief Ranger, Carol Padden and Conservation Administrator Geoff McGean began an 
outreach program for Lincoln Elementary and Middle School Students in 1996. During the 
spring, fourth grade students were introduced to vernal pools, while fifth grade students explored 
different ecological communities. 

Rangers, John Guarnieri, Jane Layton, and Mary Mcintosh joined the Ranger program 
for the summer. During the summer, Rangers offered educational walks, maintained trails, and 
educated users about appropriate trail use. Ranger Jane Layton also assisted with the Pond 
Inventory Program. In the fall, Rangers inventoried trail conditions and assisted trail users. 
During the winter, Rangers directed and assisted skiers 

The busy summer months also saw increased enforcement and protection efforts around 
the Town's drinking water supply, Flint's Pond. Cooperation and financial assistance from the 
Water Commissioners allows for more ranger support around Flint's Pond. This increased 
support and education over the past few years has resulted in a reduction in the number of 
ranger-reported violations occurring in and around the pond. Rangers also increased their 
efforts to educate mountain bikers about the Towns Mountain Bike Policy and to enforce that 
policy when necessary. 

The donation boxes at the schools and the Lincoln Woods trailhead continue to be a 
source of support for the Ranger program. Money contributed to these boxes helps to offset the 
cost of the Ranger program and ongoing trail maintenance activities. Additional funds are 
collected through direct donations to the Conservation Commission, and group user fees. 
Together, these sources of revenue totaled approximately $450.00. 

CONSERVATION LAND MANAGEMENT 

Trails : The Land Manager continues to maintain the extensive trail system for the 
enjoyment of residents and visitors. At the Tanners Brook Conservation parcel, trails were 
maintained by cutting of brush and marking of trails. The designated bike trail had an additional 
section added to it to include a Macintosh Lane to School connection. A volunteer trail work day 
was arranged using Lincoln Guide Service help. The project involved the installation of water 
bars on the Pine Hill Bike Trail to prevent erosion on this heavily used trail. Work involving the 
posting of regulatory signs and notices took place throughout Town, including horse and bike 
restrictions, fire lane signs, and general rules posting. Hazard trees were removed at the Mt. 
Misery and 77 acre Sandy Pond Trust parcel. A damaging winter storm with heavy snow broke 
many trees over and on to trails and roadways in mid-December. Follow up work involved the 
clearing of the 50+ miles of trails using the help of volunteers, Conservation Rangers and the 
Land Manager for major problem trees. Continued trail maintenance includes; the maintenance 
of water bars through removal of accumulated sediment and debris, brush cutting to maintain 
trail width, sign repair, and gate maintenance. 

Fields : Over 50 acres of open fields and edges were maintained using the 
department's tractor which has a 5 foot diameter rotary mower, and a hand-held brush cutter. 
This mowing and brush cutting maintains the open space character of the Town's conservation 
fields. Mowing also maintains a grassland habitat for wildlife by not allowing the fields to grow in 
to heavy brush and trees. The fields are mowed late in the summer to allow for nesting wildlife 
to mature. Some sections of fields are being mowed on a rotation basis, leaving certain 
sections of the fields not mowed for a two year cycle. This mowing regime allows for the 
preservation of a winter cover and food source throughout the winter which is essential for 
certain wildllife species. 

Town Plantings and Tree Care : At the Town Office building, the foundation shrubs were 
pruned for maintenance purposes. Tree plantings consisted of five Chestnut Oaks along 



88 



Brownings field and Weston Road, three Magnolias near Codman Farm to continue with the 
existing planting, four Red Maples along Old Bedford Road, near Battle Road Farm, and two 
Kousa Dogwoods at the Town Office building entrance. Continued care of eight Elm trees, 
involving the injection of chemicals to prevent the Dutch Elm Disease, also took place. At the 
Fire and Police Station, three large Spruce trees were moved with a tree spade to allow for 
construction room and to act as a screen at their new location between the proposed building 
and an abutter's property. 

Other Projects : Wildlife management involved the placement of signs to protect the 
Goshawk nesting area near Flint's Pond and assisting with the salamander road closure signs. 
Bird nesting boxes were constructed for kestrals (a small hawk) and placed in the field, while 
existing nesting boxes, including those for wood ducks and blue birds, were maintained The 
double-sided signs at the School entrance and Canoe Landing were repaired and re-painted. At 
Snider Pond, an old rubble dam was rebuilt by the Lincoln D.P.W. This rebuilding will allow 
water to be held in the pond for a longer time each year, supporting a diversity of wildlife. A 
substantial amount of time was spent on snow removal early in the year given the record setting 
snowfall. 



89 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

Kenneth E. Bassett 

Robert C. Brannen 

William A. King 

Gwyneth E. Loud 

Richard K. Nichols, Treasurer 

Katharine M. Preston 

Paul Svetz 

Robert H. Webb, Secretary 

William G. Constable, Chairman 

"Grass roots" is the term d'jour among contemporary environmental advocates and 
funders. Perhaps no organization is more "grass roots" than the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 
which has, for almost 40 years, used all-volunteer efforts to protect both our grass lands and our 
community roots . Individual initiative, nurtured in the context of community participation, remains 
the hallmark of LLCT efforts in protecting Lincoln's open space and utilizing the town's bountiful 
natural resources. In 1996, many dozen citizens assisted the LLCT through their informal 
stewardship of trails and lands, as well as numerous work days, studies, and activities. The 
LLCT continues its efforts in conservation management, inventory and education. 

Natural resource protection remains the backbone of LLCT activities. 1996 weather 
conditions made maintenance of approximately 60 miles of trails an even more arduous task for 
volunteer stewards, as well as two summer trail workers. The program to improve our trails 
continued in 1996 with construction of an important trail connector on Pierce Hill, reconstruction 
of additional causeways, and installation of erosion control on many heavily used trails. 

Farming and open field management were continued largely through the efforts of Page 
Road Associates, the Codman Community Farm, and the Flint family. Of particular note has 
been the efforts to restore field edges, cutting back encroaching vegetation to restore the fields 
and, occasionally, unveil historic stone walls. 

Management of our resource areas include protection of unusual habitats upon and in 
wetlands. Natural succession was highlighted this year, as dialogue continued about protecting 
the habitat of one of Lincoln's more rare species, a bog orchid around which vegetative growth is 
reducing its viability. In conjunction with the Massachusetts' State Botanist, the Conservation 
Commission, the Wildlife Advisory Committee, and interested citizens, gentle vegetative 
management was undertaken to protect this unusual population. The Wildlife Advisory 
Committee of the LLCT and Conservation Commission continues to provide additional guidance 
on conservation matters, including a regular wildlife column in our local newspaper. The Wildlife 
Advisory Committee has established a Wildlife Hotline at the Conservation Commission office, 
through which wildlife reports may be recorded at 259-2612. 

The renewed effort to inventory Lincoln's natural resources benefited greatly from private 
initiatives in 1996. The 1995 grass land inventory was followed this year by a natural resource, 
land use, and historical study of Lincoln's most significant ponds. Summer work of an aquatic 
ecologist summer intern augmented volunteer initiatives through a Ponds Committee, 
coordinated with the LLCT and Conservation Commission. This data about our water bodies 
provides an irreplaceable baseline against which future changes, and management alternatives, 
may be measured. The Lincoln Ponds Report is available at the library and in the offices of 
conservation organizations. We anticipate further scientific measurement of Lincoln's natural 
areas. 



90 



Education has continued to develop as an important LLCT priority. Sales of the Guide to 
Conservation Land in Lincoln and Trail Maps continues to provide information to the thousands 
who enjoy Lincoln's trails. The LLCT continues to work with Brook's School teacher David 
Joseph to incorporate Lincoln's natural resources into the science programs at the Lincoln 
schools. Under the initiative of the Lincoln Garden Club, the LLCT and Conservation 
Commission have begun construction of a self-guided nature trail, behind Brook's School, 
including a platform in the wetlands for nature observation, scientific studies, and contemplation. 

The LLCT expresses appreciation to all who use Lincoln's open space, and especially to 
those stewards who help maintain the lands, waters and trails. As always, comments about trail 
conditions or other LLCT matters may be addressed via the LLCT phone line (259-0199). 



91 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 
1996 FINANCIAL SUMMARY 

Balance as of 12/31/95 

Lincoln Conservation Fund 275,039 

Fidelity Money Market Funds 1 00,988 

Jean W. Preston Memorial 16,967 

Baybanks 7,053 

Total Balance 12/31/95 400,047 

1996 Receipts 

Direct Public Support (contributions) 13,946 

Sale of Trail Guides 1 ,386 

Sale of Trail Maps 2,790 

Recycling Funds 120 

Agricultural Leases 120 
Interest 

Lincoln Conservation Fund 13,264 

Fidelity Money Market Funds 5,228 

Jean W. Preston Memorial . 875 

Baybanks 97 

Total 1 996 Receipts 37,826 
1996 Expenses 

Trail Crew Wages & Expenses 6,285 

Field Researcher Wages & Expenses 4,287 

Insurance 1,463 

Equipment & Maintenance 247 

Mowing & Miscellaneous 366 

Legal & Filing Fees 35 

Printing & Postage 1 ,591 

Materials 1,373 

Total 1996 Expenses (15,647) 

Acquisitions from Lincoln Conservation Fund 

Adams property purchase and restriction 12,500 

Pass through of Hershey Foundation gift 25,000 

Total 1996 Acquisitions through 12/31/96 (37,500) 

Balance as of 12/31/96 

Lincoln Conservation Fund 250,803 

Fidelity Money Market Funds 1 06,21 6 

Jean W. Preston Memorial 17,842 

Baybanks 9,866 

Total Balance 12/31/96 384,727 
(After distribution of $25,000 Hershey Foundation gift held for Adams purchase) 

1989 Conservation Fund (Flint's Fields Fund) 

Balance as of 12/31/95 28,245 

1996 Donations and Interest 1,454 

Balance as of 12/31/96 29,699 



92 



HOUSING COMMISSION 

Daniel Ladd 

Sara Mattes 

B.J. Scheff 

Katharine Preston, Chairman 

Lincoln low and moderate housing stock has been experiencing tremendous pressure. 
The desirability of Lincoln's proximity to business, cultural and academic centers, coupled with 
our success in preserving open space and rural character has pushed housing prices to 
extremely high levels. This has reduced the ability of an economically diverse population to live 
in Lincoln and provides a significant challenge to the Housing Commission to "hold the line" on 
ensuring a percentage of housing stock for low and moderate income people. 

It is for this reason that during the past year we have worked particularly hard to resolve 
the problems and issues at the Codman Farmhouse. Reluctantly, we decided that the use of the 
Farmhouse for elderly congregate living was no longer feasible. The last tenant left in June. 

In response to her much needed space, the assistant farmer at Codman was moved 
from the rear to the front unit, maintaining our tradition of housing one of the Codman farmers at 
the Farmhouse. We then prepared the rear for rental to a low or moderate income person who 
met our specific guidelines. Late in the year we decided to hold off rental, pending resolution of a 
larger issue. 

Some time ago the Codman Farm Board expressed to us their desire to take over 
management of the entire Farmhouse as an integrated part of the farm. We began to explore 
options that would work toward that goal while ensuring no net loss of affordable units. 
Designated members of the Codman Farm Board have been diligent co-workers in this regard, 
and Codman has offered us a house that they currently own in exchange for the Farmhouse. 
However, the house must be moved from its present location on National Park land. Finding a 
place to move it and the money to pay for the move has been the primary challenge of the fall 
season. As of this writing, it has not yet been resolved, but we continue to work with members of 
the Codman Farm Board to seek a win/win solution. 

Meanwhile, tenancy at our three other units go very smoothly, always with the cheerful 
assistance of Earl Midgley, the Building Commissioner and Inspector. We continue to monitor 
efforts to stabilize the financial woes at Lincoln Woods. Despite some glitches, Battle Road Farm 
continues to be used as a model for many other towns who want to build beautiful affordable 
housing. 

In October, Sara Mattes was appointed by the Selectmen to fill out Gus Browne's 
position. She has been a very welcomed and extremely capable addition. 

During the year we also made a conscious attempt to raise the Town's awareness of our 
work. This ranged from a highly successful Housing Forum in April, courtesy of the League of 
Women Voters, to articles in the Lincoln Journal and to numerous meetings with almost any 
other Town board that will listen to us explain the difficulty of our particular challenge. 



93 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Ellin Fuller 

Margaret B. Marsh 

Andrew F. Hall, III, Chairman 

The highlight of the year has to be the final debugging of the disinfectant facility, a project 
which was first mandated by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) in 1 992. The 
final obstacle to bring the project to completion was the emergency generator system which, 
when initially designed and installed, did not provide for adequate air circulation causing the 
generator to overheat. After a redesign of the louver system which controlled the flow of air, the 
generator functions properly and is now exercised weekly in accordance with DEP requirements. 
The staff of the Water Department spent most of the year ironing out small design problems 
related to faulty valves, over or undersized line feeds, and many other electrical and plumbing 
problems which were finally resolved by a "take charge, get it fixed attitude" on the part of Pat 
Allen, Water Superintendent. 

Upgrading the water distribution system throughout the Town is a major priority of the 
Water Department and, this year an opportunity arose as a result of the sale of the Adams 
property on Baker Farm. The loop from the end of Granville Road across to the Adams property 
and then back down Baker Farm to Baker Bridge Road was a private water main. Through 
negotiations with the ISIS foundation, the new owners of the Adams property, we successfully 
arranged for the installation of new 8" water service throughout the loop, thus, improving fire 
protection and water pressure for all residents in the area. The ISIS Foundation agreed to install 
the water main if the Town would buy the necessary materials for the loop between Baker Bridge 
Road and the ISIS property. This was a good deal for both the Town and the residents along 
Baker Farm. In a spirit of cooperation this project is drawing to a close and it appears that the 
final installation of the water main will be completed in the spring of 1997. 

After a number of years of operating the Water Department with two full time employees 
and one superintendent, the Water Commissioners finally agreed to increase funding to allow for 
a third employee effective July 1, 1996. New regulations which required more training of 
personnel, more reporting and paper work with the DEP, and the need for more coverage in the 
field prompted the Water Commissioners to approve the addition of another employee. The 
Water Department now has better coverage and is better prepared to provide quicker response 
to water problems and, at the same time, comply with the ever increasing regulatory 
responsibilities of running a water department which has both wells and surface water sources. 

When the new intake pipe was installed as part of the disinfectant facility project, 
engineering surveys indicated that the pipe would have to be suspended in pilings, as the bottom 
of the pond was not stable enough to support the weight of the pipe. When XheJsWe^on^ were 
driven near the gate/screen house, they apparently started the process of undefmifiing the 
foundation of this structure. The building itself has now shifted approximately 8" on the granite 
foundation and the foundation itself has split and is starting to settle under itself. 

When news of the possible removal of the building from the waterfront reached some 
local residents, there was an immediate interest in saving the structure due to its historic 
significance. The Water Commissioners agreed that if the Citizen's Committee would pay to 
properly stabilize the building in the short run and then present a plan of restoration in a 
reasonable period of time that the Water Commissioners would take no immediate action to 
demolish the building. From the Water Commissioners point of view, the structure has no 
operational significance and, thus we were unwilling to commit our money to save the structure. 
At this point, the building is stabilized, however, the Citizen's Committee has not raised enough 



94 



money to date to complete the project. We expect this situation to be resolved in early 1 997 one 
way or another. 

On a financial note, the Water Department experienced a surplus again this year and it is 
expected that at the 1997 Town Meeting we will request an appropriation for approximately 
$450,000 to reduce our current outstanding debt of $915,000. It appears that we will be out of 
debt within two years. We will then start the process of building a surplus against the anticipated 
mandate of filtration by the DEP sometime in the future. 

In closing, we trust everyone realized that the Water Commissioners did not raise water 
rates in 1996. We felt that we were on track with our long-term goals and that, perhaps, a 
moratorium on rate increases would be appreciated. Finally, we want to acknowledge the fine 
work of Pat Allen and his staff. They were recently recognized by DEP as being one of, if not, the 
best Water Department staff in the Commonwealth. 



95 



STATISTICS AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1996 



Beginning 
of Year 



Additions 



End of Year 



Miles of Water Main 56.83 

Hydrants in Use 479 

Gates in Use 706 

Blow-Offs 55 

Services in Use 1 ,687 



0.20 

2 

2 



11 



57.03 
481 
708 

55 
1,698 



1991 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



54.1 million gallons 
93.6 million gallons 


$120,176 
361,201 


1992 




70.5 million gallons 
92.1 million gallon's 


$219,328 
322,234 


1993 




54.6 million gallons 
104.8 million gallons 


$ 235,909 
454,898 


1994 




58.2 million gallons 
96.5 million gallons 


$ 262,554 
435,751 


1995 




56.5 million gallons 
109.3 million gallons 


$ 263,770 
516,855 


1996 




61.9 million gallons 
90.2 million gallons 


$ 288,726 
424,331 



96 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Vincent R. DeAmicis, Superintendent, Department of Public Works 

The following is an outline of various projects accomplished by the Department of Public 
Works in 1996. 

In January, February, March and April most of the highway department's time was 
concentrating on snow removal. 

Sweeping started in March and had to be postponed until April due to two snow storms. 
It took the highway department until the middle of July to complete the sweeping. 

In April a 1 ,700 foot easement was constructed off Mill Street to replace the one blocked 
by the landfill off Route 2A. 

During the month of May street sweeping continued and winter snow damage was 
repaired. 

In June and July the highway department's time was spent sweeping and making road 
repairs. 

In August the Snyder dam was constructed on conservation land. 

During September some improvements were made at the Transfer station for recycling. 

In October more road repairs were done in preparation for winter. 

In November the highway department picked up leaves off the roadside and roadside 
paths. 

In December more road repairs were needed. On December 7 th the Town was hit with a 
heavy wet snow storm causing severe damage to roadside trees, resulting in a 2 - 3 month 
cleanup project. 

Finally, throughout the year all Town owned equipment was maintained by the highway 
department and, as a result, approximately 325 work orders were completed. 



97 



TRAFFIC COMMITTEE 

Marilyn Brandt 

Eleanor Fitzgerald 

Michael Frazier 

John Tylko 

Jane Ward 

Robert Wolf 

John Caswell, Chairman 

Traffic continues to be a subject of interest to almost all citizens, from out of towners 
who see, and thankfully report, unsafe conditions, to those who do not like yellow center lines in 
the road, to those who are very concerned over the upcoming reconstruction of the railroad 
bridge on Route 126, to those living on Route 2 who will be disrupted/displaced by 
reconstruction of Crosby's Corner. 

The Committee held a public meeting in May to report back to the Town on the studies, 
recommendations, and actions which had resulted since the Committee was formed some two 
years ago. This is a process which seems well received and is one which we will most probably 
repeat each year. Our efforts during 1996 concentrated on areas delineated by our spring 1995 
public meetings. These included attempting to bring consistency to the street line painting and 
markings, to delineate crosswalks better, to move stop fines so as to enhance visibility at 
intersections, and to improve awareness of curves, danger spots etc. through in-street 
markings. The Selectmen by and large approved our recommendations albeit with a tacit 
reminder to us that they, as well as many citizens, want to keep the number of signs in Town to 
as low a number as possible, as well as keeping the road paint to "visible but not garish". We 
have asked that the Selectmen call for in-street painting money in the Town Meeting 
appropriation to come from free cash so that it can be done earlier in the spring of 1 997. One 
problem Lincoln faces, however, is that the age of our road surfaces is such that they act as 
sponges for paint, and paint applied even as late as late August, is well faded by December. 
We will continue to research the costs and performance of better paints and also the in-street 
marking methods neighboring towns use to see what the most cost effective solutions might be. 

Signage on our roads was addressed so that obsolete and redundant signs will be 
removed, old, rusty, illegible and redundant ones replaced, and missing ones, mainly regarding 
speed limits and crosswalk warnings, will be emplaced. Revision of the speed limits on certain 
roads is under consideration with the Chief of Police. Final approval of speed limit changes, 
however, lies with the state. A review of Route 117 in Lincoln has been requested of the 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) and the Central Transportation Planning Staff 
(CTPS) because, next to Route 2, Route 117 is the most dangerous town road, and has some 
severe crossing problems and intersection problems, such as at Lincoln Road. This work will 
involve our neighbor towns along Route 1 17 as well. 

The MAPC is also reviewing the matter of truck exclusions in the metropolitan area, and 
it is our hope that we will be able to exclude through trucks over a certain weight from most of 
Lincoln's roads. Again we must gain state approval for any such actions, but we believe that 
clearly 18 wheelers and heavy construction vehicles do not need to go through Lincoln. Our 
infrastructure was never built for such loads, and the safety of our citizens is ever a concern. To 
this extent we have worked with the Chief of Police and continue to monitor the enforcement 
efforts his department performs, especially as to the results of the extra money voted in the 
1996 Town Meeting for this purpose. The details are reported elsewhere in the Town Report, 
and, to our mind, are positive and worthy of even more money and effort in 1997, limited only by 
manpower. 



98 



The Committee works on and/or monitors the work of several other committees, such 
as the Pavement Management Committee, the Route 2 Citizens Advisory Committee, the 
Hanscom Field GEIR effort, HATS, etc. whose work is reported elsewhere. Route 2 is of 
course, a never ending, most important part of Lincoln's life and traffic, and the work of 
Selectwoman Delori and Planning Board member Tingley, appears to be resulting in very 
positive solutions to the problems of access, and of takings by the state resulting from the 
Crosby Corner rebuild. The Route 2 CAC, which includes representatives of Acton and 
Concord, is next moving on to the Concord Rotary rebuild effort. Traffic Management 
Committee members following these efforts are John Caswell and Eleanor Fitzgerald, Route 2 
CAC; Eleanor Fitzgerald, HATS and the Hanscom GEIR; and Bob Wolf, the Pavement 
Management Committee. Jane Ward is the point person for truck exclusion, Bob Wolf for Route 
117 review, and Marilyn Brandt, John Tylko, and Michael Frazier are working to develop a data 
base of trucks by size and frequency, by business, and numbers of vehicles by time and day 
from the Carroll School, DeCordova, and Audubon. We would appeal to all these businesses 
and organizations to help us understand our traffic flow, and especially to help us relative to 
trucks. 

The Committee anticipates that the 1997 Town Meeting will be asked to act further on 
the roadside paths on Route 117 from Route 126 to the Mount Misery parking, and on Bedford 
Road north of Route 2. If these are constructed, as we hope they are, the Committee will make 
recommendations to the Selectmen relative to the marking, signing and crossings of Route 126 
and Route 2 to accommodate them. 

Finally, during the 1997 and 1998 construction seasons, the Massachusetts Highway 
Department (MHD) will contract to have the railroad bridge on Route 126 raised three feet (to 
accommodate higher trains) and rebuilt. This will entail making that stretch of road one way one 
year and one way the next. There will be a temporary traffic lights at each end of the 
construction to keep order, but nevertheless it promises to be problematic, and we will have to 
monitor the traffic carefully to see whether it exacerbates the problems elsewhere in town. We, 
and the Chief of Police and Fire, worry as to how emergency vehicles will manage, and we have 
asked the MHD to include controls so that our vehicles, as now presently equipped, can radio 
the temporary traffic lights to stop all traffic so that they may pass quickly and safely. 

We continue to appreciate and thank the Public Safety Department, the DPW and the 
Town Offices' personnel for all their help and support. We are especially grateful to Chief Allen 
Bowles, and we appreciate the efforts of the Selectmen and Planning Board in response to our 
recommendations. 



99 



THE PIERCE HOUSE COMMITTEE 

Judith C. F. Gross 
Jean Y. Home 
Raymond A. Levy 
Lucia MacMahon 
William Shea, Chair 

Use of the Pierce House has continued to increase again this year. A record 15 
weekends were booked for two functions per weekend, and 5 weekends hosted three events. 
The added income has allowed the necessary maintenance to keep the house and grounds in 
first class condition. 

House maintenance continues on a systematic schedule with interior painting planned for 
this winter. 

An industrial size freezer will be installed shortly to provide the same convenience as the 
refrigerator purchased a few years ago that has been welcomed by caterers and house users. 

Roll down curtains were installed on the large south porch for early spring and late fall 
functions requiring additional space for large groups. 

With the high demand for supplementary tent use, the lawn directly in front of the house 
has suffered and has little time to recover during the busy seasons. We plan to address this 
problem in the spring. 

The rear parking lot is scheduled to be hot-topped this coming summer which will finally 
provide a safer walking surface and some organization to a car parking plan. 

Finally, we all want to express our sincere thanks to Lynn Donaldson who left Lincoln this 
past summer, and had been a committee member off and on over the past fifteen years. 

The Silver family should also be recognized for taking an extraordinary interest in the 
house and they are solely responsible for the extensive increase in house activity and customer 
satisfaction. 



100 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Natalie A. Faddoul 
Martha DeNormandie 
Ann Janes, Chairman 

Nancy Zuelke, Agent 

Our main focus for 1996 was the landscape in the Lincoln Cemetery. We have hired an 
arborist, James Allen, to inventory all the trees and label them with aluminum tags. This inventory 
will include the name, the condition and work order suggestions for the necessary care or removal 
of the trees. In the spring of 1997 the pruning, etc. will be done by students from Minute Man 
Technical High School Horticultural Department. These students will be supervised by a faculty 
member. For this project we are consulting and relying on the expertise of Michael Murphy of the 
Conservation Commission. 

The long awaited rules and regulations sign project has been completed after many 
delays. The signs were delivered and installed as of November 15, 1996. One sign is placed on 
the cobble stone pillar at the entrance to the cemetery and the other at the intersection of the 
conservation trail and fire lane, at the north end of the cemetery. 

To appropriately preserve the cemetery grounds there is continual on-going maintenance. 
This effort is directed by Vincent DeAmicis and Richard Campobasso of the Department of Public 
Works. 

We have recognized the problem of damaged bushes, chipped or stained memorials 
caused by the large mowing machines. Our recommendation, to plot owners, is to photograph 
the stone and surrounding plantings, place a copy of the photo in their cemetery file at the Town 
Office. This documentation will help to identify the problems and to negotiate repairs or plant 
replacements with the mowing company. 

Another concern is the negative environmental impact on both the memorials and trees at 
Arborvitae Cemetery. The problem could be acid rain, automobile pollution or age, it must be 
investigated. 

We will continue the pattern set years ago by other commissioners to support the integrity 
of the cemeteries through proper maintenance and thoughtful planning. 

During 1996 twenty-three lots were sold and twenty-six interments took place. 



101 



LINCOLN HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 

Eleanor H. Fitzgerald 

Kenneth E. Hurd 

Mary G. Spindler 

James B. White 

Colin L.M. Smith, Chairman 

Abigail S. Congdon (Alternate) 

Baseball was on the agenda again this year. The Commission approved a new plan 
submitted by the Recreation Committee to regrade the entire area behind the Town Offices to 
provide a permanent field for both junior soccer and T ball. This would take the place of the 
temporary arrangement that has prevailed for the past few years. 

The Commission approved a proposal by the Trustees of the Library to build a small 
terrace on the south side of the Library. Discussions concerning street lighting on Library Lane 
are on-going pending a discreet solution. 

An application by Russ and Pam Hansen to build a small addition at 15 Lincoln Road 
was approved. 

An application by Nancy Soulette to renovate and build a small addition at 1 Woods End 
Road was approved. 

An application by Anne Finucane to renovate a carriage house at 20 Trapelo Road was 
approved. 



102 



BEMIS HALL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Barbara Beal 

Elaine Bloom 

Natalie Faddoul 

Debra Haiduven 

John Manzelli 

Blythe Robinson, (ex-officio) 

The Advisory Board held one meeting during 1996. The focus of the meeting revolved 
around the renovations and the redesigning of the Council on Aging rooms. 

The Board also recommended to the Selectmen that the Map Room no longer be made 
available to the general public for rental. 

Restoration on the piano was completed and it was returned to Bemis Hall this year. 
Everyone is delighted with the quality and superior sound and are enjoying it immensely. The 
Board appreciates the assistance provided by the Lincoln Cultural Council to make this a reality. 



103 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 

Gabrielle Brenninkmeyer 

Jeffrey Brown 

Elizabeth Donaldson 

JoAnn England 

Joanna Hopkins, Treasurer Elect 

Rollin Johnson 

Heidi Nichols 

David O'Neil 

Ellen (Owen) Todd 

Steven Perlmutter 

Carla Ricci 

Margaret-Ann Rice 

David Ries 

Elizabeth Taylor Lerman, Clerk 

Karl Zuelke 

William Stason, President 

1996 was an eventful, challenging, and successful year for CCF. There is no question 
that the farm is on a trajectory that bodes well for ever greater contributions to the Lincoln 
community and region. Farming, educational, social, and management objectives each took 
distinct steps forward. 

Larry Fleckenstein and Anne Papadopoulos led farming activities that were highlighted by 
an ambitious program to upgrade the quality of hayfields that we lease from the Conservation 
Commission or care for for private owners. New projects included development of a composting 
program that will substitute recycled products for fertilizer in maintaining fields and raising corn 
silage as feed for cows. More than 12,000 bales of excellent hay were harvested. Cows, pigs, 
sheep and chickens yielded a variety of naturally raised products that were sold through the 
Codman Farm Store. A thorough reevaluation of meat sales led to reorganization of our storage 
and marketing effort that promises greater availability of meats in 1997. Controversy over veal 
calves continued. CCF has decided to continue raising veal calves as an intrinsic part of the cycle 
of life on a balanced farm but is doing everything it reasonably can to do this humanely and to 
remain sensitive to the opinions of those who have contrary views. Community garden plots were 
again a cornerstone of our agricultural programs; 110 plots thrived under the care of a diverse 
group of farmers from Lincoln and neighboring towns. 

A barn fire that was set accidentally by a lighted match on August 25 threatened the very 
existence of the farm. Thanks to early detection and superlative work by fire departments from 
Lincoln and 8 neighboring towns, plus a throng of vigorous volunteers, damage was minimized 
and the barns were saved. The event, while costly in terms of barn repair (about $40,000) and 
lost produce (nearly $10,000 worth of hay and grain for animals), created extraordinary benefits as 
well - increased awareness of CCF as a unique resource within Lincoln, an outpouring of tangible 
support (financial and physical effort), and closer cooperation than ever between CCF and town 
boards and departments. We will forever be grateful to the Fire and Police Department and the 
Department of Public Works for their assistance. The fire has left CCF weakened financially in 
the short-term but stronger than ever as a town organization. 

CCF received an enormous boost when the Ogden Codman Trustees very generously 
agreed to contribute $17,000 toward the construction of a small new barn in the lower barnyard. 
The barn will help us to feed, shelter, and care for pigs and cows better than we can now. This 
gift will be matched by funds raised in the community. Plans are in progress for a 'good ole 
fashioned barn-raisin' in the fall of 1997. 



104 



Educational programs flourished during 1996. These programs currently expose nearly 
95% of Lincoln children to the pleasures and perils of farming. The Children's Garden at CCF was 
a spectacular undertaking that involved more than 30 children and dedicated parents. Hartwell 
School's chicken-hatching and pumpkin, sunflower and gourd planting programs were more 
popular than ever, and the Farmer's Helper Program thrived. A new pilot program called 'Hired 
Hands' - funded by the Codman Trustees - will offer teenagers a hands-on farming opportunity 
during this coming spring vacation. 

Outreach to other community organizations remained a high priority. Connections with 
Drumlin Farm, the Food Project, Minuteman National Historical Park (MNHP) and the Housing 
Commission were especially fruitful. Close collaboration with Drumlin Farm in sharing farm help 
and farm equipment has become a tradition that is a win-win arrangement. This year it took on an 
added dimension when CCF harvested Drumlin's hay while a new farmer was being hired. To 
help the Food Project meet its production goals, CCF relinquished another 4 acres of North 
Codman Field (added to the 4 acres we had freed the previous year). Our support for the Food 
Project is rooted in its objectives to educate youth in farming practices while supplying vegetables 
to inner city people. The development of closer relationships with MNHP centered on our 
common interests in sustaining farming in New England. An initiative to renew a pasture for cattle 
next to the Hartwell Tavern continued; and possibilities for adding sheep and chickens were 
explored. We expect these programs to expand in future years. 

Close collaboration with the Housing Commission provides an outstanding example of 
how two Lincoln groups can work together to their mutual benefit. CCF is confronted with critical 
needs for subsidized housing for its farmers and for a business office. The Housing Commission 
is confronted with a failed experiment in congregate housing in the Codman Farmhouse and the 
need to identify new strategies for increasing the number of affordable residential units in town. 
Proposed solution: CCF will give its farmer's house on Bedford Lane to the Housing Commission 
(MNHP owns the land and has required that the house be moved to accommodate development 
of new trail system); the Housing Commission will turn management of the Farmhouse over to 
CCF; and the Ogden Codman Trustees will provide funds for moving the Bedford Lane house to a 
Town-owned site on Mill Street. At this writing, details are still being worked out but optimism 
prevails. 

Social activities sponsored by CCF were highlighted by the Fifth Annual Gala Dinner and 
Auction in May and the Farmside Feast and Harvest Fair in September. Interspersed were the 
Annual Meeting for Members in March, the luncheon served at Town Meeting, sheepshearing , 
our annual dinner for the Ogden Codman Trustees in June, a prize-winning float in the fourth of 
July parade, and the (almost) annual trail race in October. CCF is a busy place! 

Our heartfelt thanks to all of you who have given so generously of your time, energy, and 
money to make CCF and its activities possible. We hope that all Lincoln residents will take an 
active part in helping us to maintain farming in Lincoln and to build a farm that will better serve the 
community's needs. 



105 



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108 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

William G. Constable, Town Representative and 1996-1997 President 

Lincoln's representative is completing his second term as President of the Metropolitan 
Area Planning Council (MAPC). As the regional planning agency for 101 cities and towns in 
Eastern Massachusetts, MAPC provides communication, research and technical assistance to 
its towns, its subregions and its affiliated agencies. MAPC's activities and accomplishments on 
behalf of its 2.8 million citizens are substantial and varied. Achievements of statewide and 
national importance complement the numerous examples of service to subregions and 
municipalities in Eastern Massachusetts. 

Perhaps the most notable achievement in 1996 was MAPC's leadership revising the 
mechanism for determining aid to state and local transportation projects within the region. 
Culminating an effort of several years, the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) has been 
expanded, reducing the dominance of the state agencies and permitting, for the first time, 
substantive community involvement in the allocation of financial resources from the federal 
government to various transportation projects in the metropolitan region. When a 1995 federal 
review of the MPO found substantial deficiencies in the existing process, MAPC played a central 
role in redesigning the organization. In addition to adding several local representatives to the 
MPO, the new agreement helps ensure that at least $40 million will be allocated by community 
representatives for community transportation projects in the MAPC region. The election of the 
first community positions will take place early in 1997 at an MAPC Council meeting. 

While the Central Artery/Third Harbor Tunnel Project remains the largest public works 
project in the region (and in the nation!), Congress is considering changes to federal 
transportation financing law which could have a greater impact on the state-wide road and 
bridge program in Massachusetts. MAPC continues to work to thwart a reduction of perhaps 
$400 million annually in federal transportation aid to Massachusetts, as contemplated in 
proposed federal transportation laws. 

More locally, the eight subregions of MAPC continue working on their numerous 
initiatives. Lincoln's participation in the Minuteman Advisory Group on Interlocal Coordination 
(MAGIC) has contributed to subregional review of Route 2, Hanscom Field, MBTA assessments 
and developments of regional impacts. MAGIC has convened the towns' executive officers and 
the region's legislators, providing a dialog and focus for regional initiatives. Crawley Cooper and 
Buzz Constable are the Selectmen's designees to MAGIC. 

Massport's Generic Environmental Impact Report for Hanscom Field is receiving local 
guidance from the four HATS (Hanscom Area Towns) Committee, staffed primarily by MAPC. 
In 1996, through HATS the towns of Lincoln, Bedford, Concord and Lexington created an 
unprecedented joint planning effort for the Hanscom region. This master planning process 
provides not only a counterpoint to Massport's future activities; it also provides an opportunity for 
private developments on the borders of these towns to be considered in light of each others 
priorities. 

MAPC provides many planning services to its communities and state agencies within 
the region. The MAPC Geographic Information System (GIS) Lab has continued to grow and 
provide new services to local government. Eight workshops on GIS data automation provided 
core education to assessors, planners and other local officials on the emerging computer 
technology which will significantly change local information systems over the next several years. 
GIS staff provided maps for HATS, the Sudbury-Assabet-Concord River Basin analysis, and 
Dpen space advocates within the region. 



109 



Among the several hundred educational and advocacy meetings that the agency 
sponsors each year, several merit particular note. MAPC's ongoing Metropolitan Community 
Dialogs included meetings on such topics as: 1) the disjunct between projected employee 
needs in the region and the employee training programs available; 2) implementation of the 
Governor's Executive Order 384, which provides for sunsetting of state regulations; 3) future 
economic development initiatives; 4) the merits and mechanisms of encouraging Transit 
Oriented Development (TOD), which concentrates development around existing infrastructure; 
and 5) coordinating the many open space preservation and recreation conservation 
organizations within the region. 

MAPC's legislative assistance provides municipalities, planners, natural resource 
advocates, and transportation interests with a knowledgeable communications link with the state 
legislature. Many of the MAPC legislative priorities were passed in 1996, including Title V Septic 
System Assistance, the Rivers Protection Bill, and bond bills relating to Open Space, 
Transportation, and Sea Port Improvement. 



110 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Elliot Curtis 
Kathy Nicholson 
Beth Ries, Chairman 

During 1996 the Board worked closely with Executive Secretary Tim Higgins and 
Assistant Executive Secretary Blythe Robinson in dealing with town personnel issues. The 
Board's primary efforts were directed at making certain that the numerous non-union town 
positions were properly classified within the personnel system. The Board utilizes the 
classification guidelines devised by consultants in 1987 to determine the appropriate grade level 
and compensation range for each position. As jobs change or new positions are created, the 
classification process helps to assure parity among employees. 

In response to a request from the library staff, the Board discussed the possibility of 
establishing a sick leave bank for town employees. Once more research has been completed, 
the Board will again consider the question. 

As a follow-up to earlier activities, the Board expects to assist the Executive Secretary in 
implementing a progress review system in 1997. The system is designed to help managers work 
effectively with employees in assessing their performance, with the goal of continuously 
improving employee job know-how and job satisfaction. 

Two members enthusiastically participated in the Springboard 1996 and moderator's 
team meetings. The Board as a whole looks forward to future gatherings with other town boards 
and to assisting with pertinent issues that various officials may bring to their attention. 



Ill 



LIBRARY, RECREATION & SCHOOLS 
TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 







Term Expires 


Emily Althausen 


Self-Perpetuating 




Bruce Bare 


Selectmen's Appointee 


1999 


Linda May 


Elected 


1998 


Nancy Rote 


School Committee Appointee 


1997 


Joseph Sussman 


Self-Perpetuating 




Craig Hill, Chairman 


Self-Perpetuating 




OVERVIEW 







The year at the library went smoothly. As in past years the staff provided a welcoming 
atmosphere for patrons of all ages, along with ready access to the books, materials and 
information they wanted. Once again, a variety of events, programs and exhibitions offered 
intellectual or aesthetic delight - and there was creative fun involving lots of kids in the joys of 
reading. The library building received several necessary repairs and one relatively inexpensive 
improvement, the new reading terrace, was at last completed. 

While circulation of books and materials rose only modestly over 1995 levels, our 
circulation per capita continued to be among the highest in the Commonwealth for towns in our 
5,000-10,000 population cohort. We continued our steady progress in providing patrons with 
access to the information technology realm along with our traditional library services. Books and 
the printed page remain our core concern, but our reference capabilities continued to expand 
with our access through the Minuteman Library Network to such electronic information sources 
as the Internet (via a text-only LYNX connection), the IAC Magazine Index Database, the 
Minuteman Community Information and Referral Database, and the on-line catalogs of libraries 
throughout the country. Two new terminals were added this year - one additional public access 
terminal in the Reference Room, and one for staff use. 

The Vault in the Historical Room of the library has for many years been a principal 
repository of Lincoln historical material and sometimes a resting place for items of dubious 
historical relevance. In 1996 a rejuvenated Vault Committee, composed of Library Trustee Emily 
Althausen, Peg Carmen, Bisty Donaldson, Ann Janes, Jack McLean, Peg Martin, Elizabeth 
Snelling, and Library Director Jerry Cirillo, greatly helped by the archival expertise of reference 
Librarian Jeanne Bracken, succeeded in sorting through the jumble. Items not connected to 
Lincoln history were deaccessioned and in the process money was raised to conserve, restore 
and re-hang several paintings of Lincoln scenes that had been moldering in the Vault for years. 

MONEY. TIME. MATERIALS 

A budget increase of 4.7% was approved at the March 23 Town Meeting for the fiscal 
year ending June 30,1997. This increase included a 3% cost of living adjustment. The salary 
allocation incorporated those four additional hours per week for the reference position and four 
hours per week for the Circulation Assistant position that had been listed as "extra hours" in the 
previous year's budget. No other changes were made in staffing levels or in hours open to the 
public. 

The budget line item for books and other library materials rose only 1 .5% to an amount of 
$55,825. This municipally appropriated amount was again supplemented, as in years past, by 
generous contributions from the Friends of the Library, many individual private donors, library 
trust funds, and other non-municipal sources of income. Increasing the materials appropriation 



112 






in the coming years will be a primary focus of the Trustees. An increased materials appropriation 
will allow the library to continue to meet the demands of its patrons for current materials in a 
variety of formats, and also bring the library closer to meeting the required percentage of 
expenditures necessary for continued State Certification by the Massachusetts Board of Library 
Commissioners. Although for the foreseeable future, the library will no doubt continue to rely on 
private funds to supplement its materials allocation, the Trustees would like to lessen the reliance 
on private funding and shift the balance more to the municipal side. 

STAFF 

John Bottino, library custodian since November 15, 1960, retired on September 22, after 
thirty-six years of service, and one day before his 81 st birthday. John was truly a presence at the 
library. John's hard work, cooperative attitude, and sharp sense of humor are sincerely missed 
by the staff. Robert Bottino now becomes our "senior" custodian, with two new assistants, Bob 
Lager on weekday and Saturday mornings, and Dan Guden as Sunday and back-up custodian. 

Dana Weigent was on leave of absence from the Children's Room from February 
through May. During Dana's sojourn in Switzerland, the Children's Room carried out its program 
with the assistance of temporary employees Jean Kennedy, Rachel Lefkowitz, and extra hours 
from Kathy Rushby. 

There were no other staff changes in 1 996. 

TRUSTEES 

Long time Trustee Douglas Harding resigned his position as Self-Perpetuating Trustee 
after a term of 14 years. After interviews with several candidates the Board selected Joseph 
Sussman as the Board's new Self-Perpetuating Trustee. A professor at MIT, Joe brings to the 
Board a deep concern for the Lincoln Public Library and a wealth of experience in both the 
business and academic worlds. Joe served this year as the Board's representative on the town- 
wide Capital Planning Committee. 

Trustee Sub-committees: Building and Grounds: Emily Althausen and Craig Hill: 
Personnel: Linda May and Nancy Rote; Collections and Programs: Bruce Bare and Joseph 
Sussman; Vault Committee: Emily Althausen. 

CELEBRATIONS 

In February the Friends sponsored a reception and book-signing party for David Donald, 
a long-time Lincoln resident and twice a Pulitzer Prize recipient, to celebrate the publication of his 
newest book, Lincoln. 

In March the library was favored by a visit from the Mayor of Lincoln, England, the 
Honorable Geoffrey Ellis. 

This year's library entry in the town's Fourth of July parade celebrated the library's mix of 
traditional materials and new technology with a float titled "From Charlotte's Web to the World 
Wide Web." Once again, as a testament to the Trustees' hard work and long-range planning, the 
float was a prize winner. 

A reception honoring John Bottino on the occasion of his retirement was hosted by the 
Trustees on November 17. Many of John's family and friends, as well as present and former 
trustees and staff, gathered to wish John well. 



113 



At this year's Boxing Day at the library, the magician Bonaparte entertained an audience 
of more than seventy-five, many of them children. The gathering was a lively one, with the 
audience, both children and adults, suitably entertained and mystified. 

BUILDING AND GROUNDS 

The gift of two hand-crafted teak garden benches from the Cole family in memory of 
Edwin and Lucy Cole prompted the Trustees to revive their plan for a "reading terrace" at the link 
between the old and new wings of the building. With a plan generously donated by landscape 
designer and library neighbor, Abigail Congdon, and construction work by Todd Brown's Lincoln 
Tree and Landscape at below-market rates, the terrace, funded entirely by donations, at last 
became a reality. We look forward to its becoming a popular spot for reading and reflection 
during the warmer months. 

In some less visible but no less important building improvements, seven new recessed 
lights were installed in the Reference Room; gutters, flashing, and roof slates were 
repaired/replaced on the Preston Building; a water leak over the Children's Room desk was 
repaired; and several new electrical outlets were installed in various locations. 

A staff committee comprised of Carolyn Birmingham, Lisa Rothenberg, and Kathy 
Rushby did an excellent job in preparing a plan for the re-design of the staff work area. The 
library is now working with an interior design consultant to develop this plan into a formal 
proposal and then to begin the bidding process. 

FRIENDS 

The library was once again blessed with the enthusiastic support of the Friends of the 
Lincoln Library. 

In May, the Friends undertook their second Lincoln house tour. This year's tour of seven 
extraordinary Lincoln homes, "Rooms With a View," drew more than 300 participants. Ably 
coordinated by Laura Crosby and Jo Ann England, the tour was a significant fund-raiser for the 
Friends and resulted in the presentation of a substantial check to the library. 

The Friends also sponsored their third literary tour to Great Britain. This year the focus of 
the trip was on Victorian women writers, and on sites associated with the Brontes, with George 
Eliot, and with Elizabeth Gaskell. The tour once again proved to be a successful fund-raiser for 
the Friends and drew enthusiastic reviews from participants. 

On May 21 the Friends hosted their annual "appreciation luncheon" for library staff and 
volunteers. Earlier that same day Lincoln publisher David Godine was guest speaker at the 
group's Annual Meeting. 

The Friends also made a substantial contribution to the library's materials budget and 
underwrote the cost of seven museum passes. They funded both Children's and Adult 
programming throughout the year and the printing of the library's three seasonal brochures. 

The Trustees and staff would like to take this opportunity to note the passing in 1996 of 
our premiere "Friend," Jane Telling. Jane worked long and hard for our Friends' group; the 
Friends' 1996 House Tour was dedicated to her memory. Jane has left a legacy to the library 
and the Town that will be cherished and remembered for a long time to come. 



114 



GRANTS 

The library met the State Certification requirements of the Massachusetts Board of 
Library Commissioners in 1996 and was thus eligible for three State Aid payments: a Library 
Incentive grant of $3914.00; a Municipal equalization grant of $1888.63; and a Non-Resident 
Circulation award of $7853.75; for a total State aid payment of $13656.38. 

Once again we participated in the Massport Community Summer Jobs Program, and we 
were fortunate to have the services of two very capable young people, Melissa Tobin of Concord, 
and Brendan Lennon of Lincoln, as our two summer interns. Each of them worked very well in 
covering the adult and children's circulation desks and assisting with a number of special 
projects. 

PROGRAMS 

Both the Children's and Adult departments again presented a full complement of 
programs for library patrons of all ages. In all, 292 programs were presented to total audiences of 
7,075. 

In addition to regularly scheduled storyhours throughout the year, the Children's 
Department presented many entertaining special programs. 

February school vacation week's theme of "Russian Roundabout" featured appearances 
by Igor Folkin's Wooden Horse Puppets, the Starbird Puppet Theatre, and a Russian Tale and 
Craft program. 

"Mystery Week" was the theme of the April vacation week's activities, highlighted by a 
scavenger hunt throughout the library. 

Approximately 150 readers participated in "Catch the Summer Spark," this year's 
summer reading program. Together they read more than 1 ,000 books. Summer presentations 
featured "Bubblemania," "Alexander the Jester," and "Mad Science of Greater Boston," as well as 
a grand finale party in Pierce Park. 

Authors, illustrators, and performers visiting the Children's Room this year included 
Lucinda Landon, author of the Meg Mackintosh series, Marcia Estabrook as Mother Goose, 
illustrator Jill Barton, and storytellers Marc Joel Leavitt and Elisa Pearmain. Lincoln resident Sally 
Kindleberger brought her fourth grade drama class from the Nashoba Brooks School to perform 
Halloween skits for Lincoln preschool children in October. In the year's final presentation the 
Children's Room cosponsored with the Metco program a visit from Mpeti Ole Surum on the "Way 
of the Maasai." This Maasai warrior completely captivated a spellbound audience of more than 
150 children and adults. 

In May and June the Children's Librarians visited the Lincoln Public Schools for their 
annual booktalk presentations to children in grades K - 8. 

Adult programming featured both a summer film series and an evening book discussion 
group that focused women writers of the Victorian period as a complement to the Friends 
September literary tour. 

Ellen Sisco's perennially popular Friday Morning book group featured "Sea Stories" - 
ncluding such classics as Mutiny on the Bounty , and Joshua Slocum's Sailing Alone around the 
World , and notable contemporary works by Peter Matthiessen, John Casey, and Charles 
Johnson. 



115 



Classic Jazz at the Lincoln Library concluded its thirteenth season with a live 
performance night on May 29 featuring Bob Connor's Yankee Rhythm Kings. Classic Jazz 
began a new round of monthly listening sessions in September. 

Our thanks to the Friends of the Lincoln Library for their generous support of both Adult 
and Children's programming. 

GIFTS 

The Trustees are grateful to all those who have contributed to the library in 1996. 
Donations of library materials, financial contributions, and the giving of many hours of volunteer 
time are all greatly appreciated. 



Agnes and Richard Wiggin 




Hunt Foundation 


Althausen Family 




John Langell 


Cambridge Studios 




Martha DeNormandie 


Anonymous 




Mary Ann Hales 


Bruce Bare 




Mr. And Mrs. Davenport 


Carol White 




Mr. And Mrs. Franklin Flaherty 


Catherine Chan 




Mr. And Mrs. Payne 


Craig and Heather Hill 




Samuel Robbins 


Joseph Sussman 




St. Ann's in the Fields 


Edith Porton 




Friends of the Lincoln Public Library 


Ellen Cannon 




Penny Binswanger 


Hendrick and Christine Slaats 






WEDNESDAY MORNING LECTURES 1996 




January Robert (Buzz) Brannen 




February Kim Niles 






March John Mitchell 






October Diana Abbott 






November Michael Fitzgerald 






EXHIBITORS IN THE GALLERY 


1996 





Lincoln Review Anniversary Covers 

Use Plume 

Ron Wood 

Hartwell & Brooks Schools 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 

Caron Smith 

Eli Brookner 

Aerial Views of Lincoln 

Peter Sugar 

Lincoln Cultural Council 

Edward Shi 

Molly Gayley 

EXHIBITORS IN THE DE NORMANDIE ROOM 1996 

Marijke Holtsop 

Mary Haigh 

Mystery Tour Photographs 

Linda Kimerling 

Mary Boyajian 

Kathie Brobeck 



116 



Juliet McNamara Rago 
Lincoln Arts Council 
Codman Farm Exhibit 



STAFF 1996 
Jerry Cirillo 
Ellen Sisco 

Lisa Acker Rothenberg 
Amy Gavalis 
Jane Flanders 
Jeanne Bracken 
Sheila Williams 
Lee Donahue 
Carolyn Birmingham 
Kathy Rushby 
Kathie Brobeck 
Ann Cheney 
Dana Weigent 
Susan Sugar 
Jean Kennedy 
Rachel Lefkowitz 
John Bottino 
Robert Bottino 
Ruth Dietmeier 
Dan Guden 
Robert Lager 
Brendan Lennon 
Melissa Tobin 



Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Technical Services Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Reference Librarian 

Assistant Children's Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Senior Library Technician 

Bookkeeper 

Circulation Assistant 

Circulation Assistant 

Circulation Assistant (on leave Feb. 

Circulation Assistant 

Circulation Assistant (Feb. - May) 

Circulation Assistant (Feb. - May) 

Custodian (retired 10/96) 

Custodian 

Library Page 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Summer Intern 

Summer Intern 



May) 



HOURS 1996 

(Jan. - June) and (Oct 20 - Dec.) 

Monday 

Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 

Wednesday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

(closed Sunday April 30-October 19) 

(July-August) 

Monday 

Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 

Wednesday 

(Sept. -Oct. 19) 

Same as above, except open Saturday 

LIBRARY VOLUNTEERS 1996 



1:00 PM to 8:30 PM 
9:00 AM to 6:00 PM 
9:00 AM to 8:30 PM 
10:00 AM to 5:00 PM 
1:00 PM to 5:00 PM 



1:00 PM to 8:30 PM 
9:00 AM to 6:00 PM 
9:00 AM to 8:30 PM 

10:00 AM to 5:00 PM 



Patty Arena 
Marcia Bibring 
Flo Caras 
Gene Darling 
Martha DeNormandie 
Jim Faran 
Roger Gordy 
B. Grim 



Jean Kennedy 
Lincoln Garden Club 
Rob Loud 
Elisa Permain 
Barbara Sisson 
Elizabeth Snelling 
Susan Sugar 
Ed Williams 



117 



With Special Thanks to: 

Jo Ann England and Jane Rizzo, and the Board of the Friends of the Lincoln Library, Inc.; House 
Tour coordinators Jo Ann England and Laura Crosby and all the volunteers who made that day 
such a success! Barbara Sisson and her wonderful "Victorian Players"; Gina White and Muriel 
Mozzi for coordinating a stimulating literary tour to the British Midlands. Also, Geoffrey Ellis, 
Mayor of Lincoln England, and the delegation from Lincoln, who extended a warm hand to the 
Library and the people of our town. 

The Library is grateful to the many people who gave books, tapes, videos, and other material to 
support the collection. They include: 



Sherry Adams 

Kathy Allott 

Suzanne Art 

Tracey Barron 

Jim and Marcia Beardsley 

Lillian Beenhouwer 

Sally Bobbit 

John Boyer 

Nancy Braasch 

Jeanne Bracken 

Kathie Brobeck 

Jeffrey Brown 

Elaine Burnham 

Joseph Byrnes 

Emily Carmen 

Ann Cheney 

Marcia Ciarmaglia 

Holly Cole 

Dr. Cone 

Kits Culver 

Tom Curren 

Richard Dickie 

Craig Donaldson 

Sam Donnell 

Andy Egendorf 

Katie Epstein 

Lori Foley 

Kathleen Garner 

Amy Gavalis 

Molly Gayley 

Bill Gnichtel 

Roger Gordy 

B. Grim 

MaryAnn Hales 

Dick Hallett 

Ruth Hapgood 

David Harder 

Susan Harding 

Beth Harrison 

Dudley Herschbach 

Margaret Hollingsworth 

Maggie Hsu 



Eliot Hubbard 

Ann Janes 

Stuart Johnstone 

Annette Koren 

Jane Langton 

Jim Lennon 

Lincoln Historical Society 

Dunbar and Irene Lockwood 

Mary Helen Lorenz 

Margaret and Paul Marsh 

Joseph Masters 

Linda May 

Merullos Family 

Catherine Moritz 

Jane Mueller 

Scott Murray 

Robert and Tina Nathaniels 

Jean Palmer 

Jennifer Burckett Picker 

Ben Potter 

Joyce Quelch 

Nancy Rawson 

Charlie Resnick 

William Ricci 

Clinton Rogers 

Wilfred Schmid 

Enid Sichel 

Ellen Sisco 

Christine Slaats 

Susan Sugar 

Joseph Sussman 

Tim Taylor 

Glenn Tinder 

Ruth Wales 

Patricia Warner 

Ruth Warner 

Nore Welles-Gertz 

Ben Wells 

Bella Wheeler 

Molly White 

Ruth Williams 

Sheila Williams 



118 






Magazine Subscriptions were received from the following people: 



John Boyer 


Kathy Rushby 


Kits Culver 


William Ryan 


Robert Hicks 


Marina and Wilfred Schmid 


Ludwig Luft 


Ellen Sisco 


People of Matadepera 


Sheila Williams 


Roy Raja 




STATISTICS 1996 




GENERAL: 




Number of days open 


320 


Fines Collected 


$6,838.56 


ACQUISITIONS: 




BOOKS 




Inventory 1995 


74,832 


Purchases/Gifts 


3,386 


Total 


78,218 


Discarded or Lost 


2.263 


Inventory 1996 


75,955 


BOOK ON TAPE 




Inventory 1995 


611 


Purchases/Gifts 


126 


Total 


737 


Discarded or Lost 


27 


Inventory 1 996 


710 


OTHER AUDIO-VISUAL 




Inventory 1995 


4,090 


Purchases/Gifts 


421 


Total 


4,511 


Discarded or Lost 


240 


Inventory 1996 


4,271 


CIRCULATION 




Total Circulation 1995 


134,901 


For 1996 




Adult Material Circulation 


64,107 


Juvenile Material Circulation 71.556 


Total Circulation 1996 


135,663 


PROGRAMS 




Adult Programs 


74 


Children's Programs 


161 


Non-Library Groups 


57 


Total Programs 


292 


ATTENDANCE 




Adult Programs 


2217 


Children's Programs 


3863 


Non-Library Groups 


995 


Total Attendance 


7075 



119 



LINCOLN CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Diane Braun 

Marcia Ciaramaglia 

Judy Hall 

Ingrid Neri 

Clive Russ 

Margie Topf 

Sharl Heller, Treasurer 

Suze Craig, Co-Chairman 

Sheila Williams, Co-Chairman 

The Lincoln Cultural Council receives state funds from the Massachusetts Cultural 
Council (MCC) to benefit the arts, humanities and interpretive sciences in the community. The 
main objectives of the MCC are to promote and maintain the vitality of existing cultural resources, 
to ensure the continued contribution and value of these resources, and to involve as many citizens 
as possible in some aspect of cultural activity. Allocations of state funds by the MCC are made 
according to the population and the financial need of the community. For 1996 Lincoln received 
$3,150.00 and the following grants were made pending approval of the MCC: 

Lincoln Historical Society. 
Elaine Jarvis and Ingrid Neri. 

DeCordova Museum- 
Rebecca Low. 

Deanna Arista. 
Council on Aging. 
Clive Russ. 

Melody Winnig. Elaine Bloom 

and Nancy Fincke. Community picture playground 250.00 

The LCC was instrumental in the "Celebrate Arts" show at the LSHS and awarded the 
prizes to students for excellence in two and three dimensional art. 

In October, the LCC hosted the Biannual Art Show at the Lincoln Public Library with over 
50 local artists in participation. Rachel Lafo of the DeCordova Museum spoke at the opening 
reception. 

The Lincoln Cultural Council, which promotes and supports numerous community events, 
represents artists of different backgrounds and is comprised of people very committed to seeing 
the arts thrive in Lincoln. 



Restoration of plaster relief 
Original musical theater 
production 
Art in the Park 


$ 300.00 

600.00 
250.00 


LSHS student production of 
"Fantasticks" 


500.00 


Flute Recital 


300.00 


Art exhibitions at Bemis Hall 


300.00 


Photographic portraits of 
residents 


500.00 



120 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Donna Johnson 

Janet Mahoney 

Sandy Storer 

Jane Tatlock 

John Adams, Chairman 

Debra Haiduven, Director 

The traditional recreation programs continued to do well this year. The summer day 
camp and the Codman Pool had successful summers. The day camp generated $109,539, and 
the pool generated $50,527. Overall, the actual revenues exceeded the projected revenues by 
about $25,000. This was the first year that the recreation department had the use of one of the 
Hartwell Pods (the old library pod), and we have used it to expand the number of programs we 
offer, as well as providing a more convenient location for many of the programs offered to 
elementary school children. 

This year we undertook a major field renovation project. The project is envisaged as a 
two year project, costing about $150,000 in each year. We are currently completing the first 
year, and will be requesting funding for the second year at the 1997 Town Meeting. In the first 
year, we renovated the fields behind Smith School and the Town Offices. The field behind Smith 
will now have a tee ball field, a little league baseball field/softball field, several six on six soccer 
fields, and a playground. A significant portion of the funds for this field came from private 
contributions. The field behind Town Offices will have a full sized soccer field, a six on six field, 
and a tee ball field. We succeeded in grading and seeding the Smith Fields before the great 
deluge, but the field behind Town Offices was not completed, and will be seeded this spring. 

The plan for next year is to level out Codman Field and create two full size soccer fields 
on Brooks Field. When this work is completed, we will have three large soccer fields, one 
baseball field with 60 ft. base paths, one baseball field with 45 ft. base paths, three tee ball fields, 
and numerous six on six soccer fields. We hope to be able to play on Smith Field next fall, 
behind Town Offices next spring, and to have the work on Codman completed by next spring. 

Once again the department offered a number of programs over the year that were 
funded by user fees. These ranged from weekly programs such as computertots (computers for 
kids) and martial arts, to trips such as the Sunday River ski trip. 



121 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Bruce Hoar 

Kathy Madison 

Walter Martin 

Richard Silver 

Neil Feinberg, Chairman 

1996 was a year of growth for the Celebrations Committee, and we're not just talking 
about the waistlines of the male committee members! Our town-wide mailings got bigger, 
thanks to the generous financial support of Hunneman & Co. - Coldwell Banker, and our concert 
series grew as well. 

The Celebrations Committee is charged with supporting Lincoln's Minutemen with their 
Patriot's Day celebration, for sponsoring and overseeing Lincoln's Veteran's Day tribute and July 
4 th celebration and for producing the Pierce Park Summer Concert Series. 

The Committee would like to thank former Marine Officer Mike Farny for offering his 
insights on Memorial Day. It was quite an interesting talk. Comments from Selectmen Peter 
Sugar and John Kerr were also appreciated. 

The 4 th is Lincoln's biggest celebration and is a day-long party for all town residents. As 
usual, it began with the customary and very fortifying Firefighter's Pancake Breakfast, ably 
manned by town police and fire staff. The road race would never have taken place without the 
registration assistance of Nancy Ritchie and Kathy Moritz (also a timer), timers Ingrid Neri and 
Irene Rice, Walter Page and computer with his team of race result programmers, John 
Snelling's cones, water table hose Phil Gnatowski, and Larry Zuelke and his (semi-) trusty 
musket. 

The parade route along Lincoln Road was crowded this year, with onlookers cheering 
and waving to the Grand Marshal, Dr. Perry Culver. The Committee extends a special thanks to 
Dr. C. for taking part in the festivities and for being such a good sport. 

Town committee parade floats are always a hoot, and this year was no exception. The 
Selectmen listened and got earfuls of opinions (curved or flat?) and the Finance Committee 
humorously reminded us that free cash is heading the way of the dinosaur. Parade judges John 
& Carol Caswell and Don & Denise Bienfang assiduously and irreverently reviewed all entrants 
and awarded appropriate ribbons to all participants. "Best Float in the Parade" honors were 
awarded to the Cub Scouts who built a soap box derby car of monstrous proportions, narrowly 
beating out a beautiful entry by the Lincoln Cultural Council. All who worked on floats deserve 
our appreciation. 

Of special note is the participation of the Lincoln Minutemen and especially their 
Captain, Rick Wiggin. While we know the 4 th is a fun event, there is some important history to 
remember. Rick has worked with the Committee the past two years to meld the history and fun 
parts together. Hearing Rick belt out the Declaration of Independence (because the PA system 
didn't work) was truly inspiring and if you closed your eyes you could almost imagine you were in 
Lincoln 220 years ago when town residents rose up against King George's tyranny. 

Mid-day sports events brought out soccer, tennis, swimming, Softball and basketball 
enthusiasts. The Committee would like to thank all who helped organize these events including; 
Betty Smith and Bill Stason (tennis tournament) and Jim Wolf (soccer). 



122 



This year's BBQ Dinner was a huge hit, with a record number of people feasting at 
tables and listening to the live music under tents. The Committee would like to thank all those 
who accepted reservations for us, in particular, Robin at Donelan's, the folks at 3S Pharmacy, 
the staff at Town Offices and the Library, and Deb and Dave at the Rec Department. Their 
efforts, along with Glow Stick sales people Susan Silver and Greg Welch, ensured that the day 
was not only fun but profitable as well. 

No fireworks show would take place without the donations of town residents and the 
collection and parking expertise provided by the Boy Scouts. In particular, we'd like to thank 
Paul Rice and his band of merry teenagers: Zakary Banks, Vincent Champion, Adam Cohen, 
David Hicks, Gus Holcomb, Brendan and Seamus Lennon, Ronald Otero, Jared Rice, Matt 
Taylor, Jerry Ulllman, Daniel Wolf, Dean Zaring and Scout Parent Leaders Bob Holcomb, Curtis 
Risley and Bob Wolf. As the fireworks ended, the skies opened up and the rain came; a perfect 
ending to a wonderful day. 

This year's Summer Concert Series in Pierce Park was expanded to four concerts and 
offered entertainment featuring performers with Lincoln ties. Thanks to Maureen Horigan of 
Omega Brass and Joe Masters of the Riverboat Stompers for bringing their groups to Lincoln. 
The crowds grew this year and fun was had by all. 

We look forward to seeing everyone at this year's events. 



123 



BEMIS LECTURE TRUSTEES 

Dan P. Dimancescu 
Sara Mattes 
Deborah Weisgall 

A variety of programs were presented in calendar year 1 996. Subsequent to the very 
popular full house at Brooks Auditorium for the Flash in the Pans in the fall of 1995, the program 
was followed in March of 1 996 by a panel presentation entitled "Women in China", reporting on 
the circumstances and outcomes of the controversial international conference of women in 
China the year before. 

In April of 1996 by a unique literary event, four nationally noted essayists (including 
Lincoln's own Patrick Hoy III, Jonathan Shay, Michael Norman, and George Garrett), and artist 
Ken Hruby gathered in an emotional reconciliation of their military experiences in Vietnam. The 
four writers read original essays written for the occasion with a backdrop of interpretive 
sculptures by Hruby. 

In May, the Bemis Trustees in cooperation with the DeCordova Museum hosted author 
and artist Dr. Frederick Franck. One time assistant to Dr. Albert Schweitzer in Africa, his life 
was devoted in ensuing years to a spiritual quest termed "radically trans-religious". His books on 
The Zen of Seeing, The Awakened Eye, and Art as a Way explored concepts of seeing and 
drawing as meditation. His ideas emergent from these books were shared in Lincoln in a lecture 
entitled: 'To See is to See the Sacred, To Look at It is to Miss It". 

In November, Mission Wolf returned to a full house with Sila and Guiness as "honored 
guests" bringing their human friends, Kent Weber and Tracy Brooks, with them. The audience 
shared in the experience of wolf reintroduction into Yellowstone Park and other areas of the 
United States. 

The year was also marked by a transition in Trustees from Adeline Naiman to Deborah 
Weisgall and the re-election of Dan Dimancescu. Citizens input on events is welcome as was 
underscored by numerous requests for a repeat of the lively Flash in the Pans concert (planned 
for 1997). 



124 



LINCOLN SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Nathan Greene, Hanscom Representative 

Stephen Johnson, Member 

Beth Magnone, Hanscom Representative 

Kahris McLaughlin, METCO Representative 

Patty Mostue, Member 

Terry Perlmutter, Vice Chair 

Patti Salem, Member 

Patrick Phillipps, Chair 



Lincoln School Department Report 

Dr. Mark K. McQuillan, Superintendent 

No school year is without change. New kindergartners enroll, graduating 8th graders move on to 
high school, and changes in staffing and personnel are all predictable features in the life of a system. 1996 
was no exception. In addition to enrolling more students than we have had in several years, 1996 marked the 
opening of the new Smith-Brooks complex, the hiring of Charles Ruopp, Principal of Brooks School, and the 
retirement and untimely death of Mr. Robert Budds, Director of Plant Operations and Maintenance. In 1996 
we negotiated a new agreement with the Lincoln Teachers Association, won the contract to educate the 
students at Hanscom Air Force Base, and launched the first in a succession of workshops for Boston and 
Lincoln parents on combatting racism. By any standard, 1996 was a year of improvements, purposeful 
transitions, and continuity. 



Enrollment Trends 




Smith 1994-95 


1995-96 


K 60 


81 


1 65 


62 


2 79 


71 


3 75 


88 


4 75 


77 


Subtotal 354 


379 


Brooks 




5 56 


62 


6 56 


51 


7 49 


51 


8 53 


49 


Subtotal 214 


213 



1996-97 1997-98 

69 74 

84 72 

68 88 

77 70 

86 76 

384 380 

74 73 

57 70 

55 58 

54 57 

240 258 

TOTAL 568 592 624 638 



A Positive Start after Town Meeting 

On April 27, after four years of planning, hundreds of meetings, and twenty months of construction, 
the Smith and Brooks Schools were formally united. A ceremony in front of the new library featured Crawley 
Cooper, Henry Morgan, and Esther Braun. Joanne McManus was honored for her extraordinary dedication to 
the project, Charlie Hopkins and Brooks Mostue were celebrated for their prize-winning design of the weather 
vane that sits atop the bell tower, and principals McManus and Ruopp were congratulated for their labors. The 
1995-1996 school year ended with the graduation of 54 eighth graders, and search for a new Director of 
Maintenance. 



125 



On July 4 after many long months, we learned that our proposal to provide educational services to 
the students at Hanscom Air Force Base was granted to the Lincoln Public Schools for a period of five years. 
This was very welcome, although not entirely unexpected, news. The contract awarded us sufficient money to 
start school with virtually all of our Hanscom programs intact, and only modest reductions in the budget. The 
integrated preschool program previously provided Hanscom youngsters at Magic Garden was moved to the 
Hanscom Middle School -- a change we have long advocated - and staff and positions reduced in April were 
restored. 

July brought other changes to Hanscom as well. Major Robert Roby and Barbara Messamore retired 
from their positions on the School Committee, and Colonel John A. Weimer and his family moved to Maxwell 
Air Force Base where he will be Vice Director of the Standards Systems Group. Collectively, their 
contributions to Hanscom Air Force Base and to our schools were many, and their support during the long 
hours of waiting for word on our bid proposal was much appreciated. As we paused to say goodbye to the 
good friend of our schools, we also welcomed Colonel John B. Piazza to our community. Colonel Piazza is 
an engaging leader, a strong advocate of technology in instruction, and a strong supporter of Lincoln's 
mission as a public school. 

New Policy on School Building Use 

In July, we also took steps to implement the Scho'ol Committee's new policy on building use and 
after-school programming with the Recreation Department, and to hire Jim Baker, our new Director of Plant 
Operations. With Mr. Baker and a new policy we: (1) assigned different priorities for building use, to 
accommodate more student uses than in the past; (2) shifted responsibility for scheduling classroom and 
space use from the Superintendent's office to the Recreation Department and the Smith and Brooks Schools; 
(3) required parents and community members wishing to rent or reserve space in the schools to observe the 
new policies; and (4) and asked that parents work directly with support personnel in each school when 
requesting use of classroom space. Our fine custodial staff was assigned new cleaning schedules, and a new 
evaluation system was implemented. 

Teacher Negotiations 

The summer months also occasioned several changes in our contractual arrangements with the 
Lincoln Teachers Association (LTA). In order to simplify the starting and ending of school, relieve 
overcrowding on our buses, and comply with the "Time and Learning" regulations of the 1993 Education 
Reform Act, the School Committee voted, after months of deliberation and dialogue with the LTA, to change 
the starting and ending times of instruction as follows: 



Hanscom Middle 


M.T.Th, F 


8:00-2:30 


W 


8:00-12:15 


Hanscom Primary 


M.T.Th, F 


8:15-2:30 


W 


8:15-12:15 


Brooks Middle 


M.T.Th, F 


7:55-2:30 


W 


7:55-12:30 


Smith Elementary 


MJ.Th, F 


8:40-3:00 


W 


8:40-12:00 



These changes were intended to accomplish several different goals. Among other things, the 
changes at Hanscom meant that instruction would end at the same time for all Base students. And in Lincoln, 
there would be sufficient time in the afternoon to complete a second bus run, so that middle schoolers would 
no longer have to endure long waits on the bus to allow for a common run for both schools. Under the new 
plan, Smith and Brooks students now ride at separate times. Despite this decided improvement, it is our hope 
that the new plan can be further revised in 1997 to allow for a common end to the school day on the Lincoln 
Campus. 



126 



Several other important developments emerged from our negotiations with the LTA. Among other 
things, we were able to reach a very positive settlement for a multi-year contract starting in September 1996. 
In addition to the time changes outlined above, the Committee was able to offer modest increases in salaries 
for all professional staff, improve working conditions and use of Wednesday planning periods, establish a 
teachers' mentor program, increase the number of days for summer curriculum and staff development, 
implement a new evaluation system for teacher performance, and restructure health insurance benefits for all 
teachers. 

The quality and nature of the settlement in many respects was nothing short of exceptional. The 
School Committee and I were deeply appreciative of the spirit and cooperation of all members of the LTA 
bargaining team ~ Ellen Bowles, Rose Vignola, Tina Duffy, Geoff Piece, Edie Baxter, Terri Nathanson, and 
Gian Criscitiello. Our conversations were frank, problem-centered, and always cordial. A new "mutual gains" 
bargaining process revolutionized our bargaining process and the contract proved to be a major step forward 
for all. We were especially indebted to Ellen Bowles, chairperson of the LTA's bargaining team, who, on more 
than one occasion, steered us out of troubled waters and kept us moving toward consensus. 

A Fall Assessment Policy and New Directions in 1996-1997 

With such a successful summer, our opening in September was one of our best ever. By summer's 
end, we had completed much of the work we had planned for our curriculum development teams, the School 
Committee completed its systemwide assessment policy and the Committee began organizing its 
subcommittees to complete work on the School Department's financial policies and operating procedures. 

Its policy objectives include: 

• Develop plans and options to allow all students on each campus to start and end the 
school day at the same times. 

• Analyze the structure and working assumptions underlying the School Department's 
budget and develop short- and long-range plans for improving its efficiency, clarity, 
and usefulness in guiding policy and financial decisions. 

• Approve and implement a policy for assessing the quality and effectiveness of the 
Lincoln Public Schools. 

The School Committee vigorously pursued these goals this fall. Among other things, the 
Committee's Finance Oversight Team began developing multi-year financial projections, redefining how the 
School Department budget will be developed annually, and analyzing how best to match Lincoln's budget to 
its organizational structure. In January, the Committee will host a public forum on busing and bus fees, and 
in March the Assessment Steering Committee will provide the community with an overview of how the School 
Department will annually assess our schools, with each year of a comprehensive assessment program 
contributing new data on effectiveness and quality. This spring we will conduct a parent, student, and faculty 
survey on "school climate" and evaluate the internal organizational structure of the Hanscom schools. 

Robert Budds 

Certainly the most dispiriting event this fall was the death of Bob Budds, our former Director of Plant 
and Maintenance Operation, a part of the Lincoln system since 1974. Bob was an unusually kind man, always 
looking for ways to help people - from those he hired, to the many young men and women he coached - 
and to find the best in each person. He did so by always putting forth the best of himself and treating 
everyone with respect. His death is a loss to us all. 



127 



Antiracism Training for Boston and Lincoln Parents 

In the midst of sadness, however, there was also moments of inspiration. In October Carroll Blake, 
Poppy Milner, Amy Hood, and members of the faculty who have participated in the Eastern Massachusetts 
Initiative (EMI) began a project that is certain to be a milestone for the Lincoln Public Schools, and for school 
systems throughout the Commonwealth. With the help of grant moneys, and armed with the curriculum 
materials and exercises from EMI's course "Antiracism and Effective Classroom Practices," Mr. Blake and his 
staff sponsored a six-part seminar series on understanding and combatting racism. It involved parents from 
the Lincoln and Boston communities. The seminars explored how our institutions perpetuate and engender 
racism, how people of color experience life in this country, and what is needed to break the cycles of 
oppression that have separated Americans since the founding of our country. Parents participating in the 
event described this project as one of the most important ever sponsored by our schools, and it is certain to 
carry our system one step closer toward addressing the learning needs of all our students -- Boston, Lincoln, 
and Hanscom children alike. The work of Mr. Blake and his colleagues is a fitting tribute to METCO Inc., 
which will celebrate its 30th Anniversary this March, and strong evidence of continuing progress on meeting 
our mission around diversity. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Our curriculum renewal plan entered its second year, and, like our EMI initiative, has begun to 
transform our schools. From my vantage point as Superintendent, I have watched as our curriculum leaders, 
faculty members and administrators have begun to internalize the processes and concepts needed to build a 
comprehensive curriculum, and, in doing so, how they have come face to face with some of the most vexing 
problems facing educators in this century. At the national level, as leaders debate the merits of a common 
curriculum in all states in the Union, in Massachusetts the Education Reform Act of 1993 requires all school 
districts and classrooms to align their curricula with State frameworks in mathematics, science, technology, 
fine arts, health, language arts, world languages, and social studies and to prepare for testing in grades 4, 8, 
and 10 in each of these content areas. 

Lincoln's curriculum renewal plan has already yielded many significant outcomes. Curriculum 
development teams in all subject areas have been formed and begun work. They have adopted a new health 
curriculum K-6, revised our middle school program in grades 7-8, written new curriculum guides for social 
studies K-8, created guides for world languages 5-8, built units for physical and life sciences for grades 
2,3,4, and 5, completed the first draft of a K-8 scope and sequence for mathematics, revised our middle 
school mathematics program, conducted our first formal "blue ribbon" assessment of our mathematics 
program, and begun examining the prominence of the arts in our total academic program. We will formally 
assess our language arts program this winter, redefine our long-range goals for technology instruction and 
computer use in all classrooms, and devote a good portion of our spring working with the DeCordova 
Museum and Harvard University on a three-year grant aiming to investigate how the visual arts can offer 
insight to the study of core subjects like science or history. 

The effect of this activity has been to engage our system in an ongoing debate about how content 
and instructional processes can be joined purposefully to establish a rigorous, well-articulated set of learning 
experiences from each grade and each discipline. Without this careful delineation of content outcomes for 
each grade, our effectiveness as a system is diminished. This is certainly one of the most important points 
raised in current debates about the need for a national curriculum. 

It is fair to say that, as we move to the midpoint of our second year of the curriculum renewal plan, 
that we have taken several important steps forward, even if we have many more to complete. If this work is 
allowed to continue and work toward its destinations, I am confident that much of the promise of the plan will 
be realized, and that in a few years we can begin to reduce the plan's complexity. As I wrote to the Committee 
in my analysis of the 1996 Massachusetss Educational Assessment Program results: 



128 



As we look to a new round of assessments in 1998, one that will link more closely 
with curriculum frameworks aligned with each local district, we can anticipate 
tighter fits between state assessments and our own curriculum. And we can 
anticipate that these results, coupled with our own internal assessments, will 
further help us to improve. 

As a system, Lincoln continues to provide a good, academic program for all 
students. Lincoln's system wide scores in all areas reflect the presence of a solid 
curriculum, but one that continues to need to be refined and improved, modified 
and extended. Until this curriculum is fully documented and implemented in all 
schools--a task that began in earnest last year-it is likely that the variations seen 
in each school's performance will continue to be heavily influenced by student 
turnover, students' unfamiliarity with new concepts and approaches (if they are 
entering the district for the first time), and uncertain learning connections between 
each grade. Curriculum and instruction at Smith School, for example, suggests 
much of what is possible when students and teachers are given sufficient time and 
opportunity to clarify and pursue the goals of the system. But it is also possible, 
given Lincoln's size, the mobility of our student populations, and the continuous 
readjustments in our programs to accommodate new students, that the excellence 
we know to be present in aH of our schools will be masked by factors beyond our 
control. 

Factors that we can control we will control. Improvements that we can make, we 
will make. It is our intention to learn as much from our MEAP scores as we can, 
but it is also our intention to treat them with the caution they deserve. In this 
sense, then, our system's new initiatives in comprehensive assessment and 
curriculum renewal should provide much of what is missing from findings we have 
gathered since 1988. 



Final Thoughts 

1996 was a year of change and transition. In thinking over all that has taken place and what has 
been accomplished this past year, I can only say that I am honored to be working with the professional staff in 
Lincoln and with such an excellent School Committee. Our newest members, Patty Mostue, Beth Magnone 
and Nathan Greene are certain to add much to our continued success in the months ahead, and our faculty 
and administrators are without question, among the very finest. 

I extend my thanks to all in Lincoln who have been so supportive of my efforts, and those of our 
faculty and administrators. Our parents and community members are always there to lend a hand and pitch in 
when needed, and your respect for all that we attempt to do is very evident -- as it was this past summer and 
fall when Jackie Lenth and so many others worked hundreds of hours to paint the Brooks School corridors. 
The community campaign to fund the the creation of a playground for the Smith School is only one more 
example of this spirit and dedication. These tangible signs of community support for our schools are 
extremely gratifying, and I count myself lucky to work with all of you. 



129 



CLASS OF 1996 



Christen Adkins 
Hollie Bickerton 
J. Bjom Bishop 
James Bradley 
Lucas Braun 
Jacob Brooks-Harris 
Nonia Burroughs 
Taylor Byrnes 
Elizabeth Capone 
Andrew Coleman 
Catherine Crosby 
Robert Dean, Jr. 
Maeve Gerechter 
Philana Gnatowski 
Lauren Graham 
Miken Grinnell 
Nathaniel Gundy 
Simon Halpern 
Gregg Herlacher 
Joseph Keiley 
Susan Keiley 
Manpreet Kohli 
Brendan Lennon 
Erika Levy 



Heather MacNeil 
Christopher Mansfield 
Cyreld Mills 
Katherine Mitchell 
Andrew Mosher 
Margaret Mostue 
Corynne Mulcahy 
David Onigman 
Carla Perez-Rivera 
Albert Pierce III 
Amanda Robinson 
Tanya Robinson 
Nelle Sacknoff 
Emma Sherwood-Forbes 
Daryl Short 
Tove Silver 
Joshua Solar 
Caleb Summers 
Alanna Tryder 
Julia Tryder 
Latrice Tyler 
Jermaine Watson 
Angel Willis 
Daniel Wolf 



130 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



Mark K. McQuillan 
Karen Erickson 
Dorothy Olson 
Jim Baker 
Carroll Blake 
Joanne McManus 
Charles Ruopp 
Sally Hadge 
Barry Hopping 



Superintendent of Schools 
Business Manager 
Director of Pupil Services 
Director of Plant Operations 
METCO Director 
Principal, Hartwell School 
Principal, Brooks School 
Principal, Hanscom Primary School 
Principal, Hanscom Middle School 



Hours: 



The Office of the Superintendent is open Monday through Friday from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM. 



131 



OCTOBER 1, 1996 ENROLLMENT 



SCHOOL 


GRADE 


SECTIONS 


i ) = BOSTON 


TOTALS 


SMITH 


K 


4 


69(8) 






1 


4 


84(8) 






2 


3 


68(7) 






3 


4 


74(12) 






4 


4 
19 


79(11) 


374 (46) 


BROOKS 


5 


4 


74(12) 






6 


3 


57(11) 






7 


3 


55(11) 






8 


2 
13 


54(9) 


240 (43) 






LINCOLN CAMPUS TOTAL: 


614 (89) 


HANSCOM PRIMARY 


K 


6 


87 






1 


4 


78 






2 


5 


92 






3 


4 
19 


68 


325 


HANSCOM MIDDLE 


4 


3 


61 






5 


3 


59 






6 


3 


57 






7 


3 


60 






8 


3 
15 


55 


292 






HANSCOM CAMPUS TOTAL: 


617 






LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS TOTAL 


1231 



CASE and Outside Placements 
(for October 1,1996) 



Lincoln: 3 

Hanscom: 1 



132 



SCHOOL BUILDINGS COMMITTEE 

Douglas Adams 
Kenneth Bergen 
Esther Braun 
Susyrati Bunanta 
Crawley Cooper 
Priscilla Damon 
Mark Deck 
Rita DiGiovanni 
Earl Flansburgh 
George Georges 
Priscilla Kern 
Robert Lemire 
Sara Mattes 
Henry Morgan 
William Stason 
Laurence Zuelke 
Patricia Salem, Chairman 

Although our Committee still meets from time to time, we are happy to report that our 
job is almost over. The first and second grades were moved from the Hartwell building into their 
new homes in the Smith building during the February, 1996 vacation. For the first time in many 
years, grades kindergarten through eight are now housed under one roof. One can walk from 
kindergarten to the Donaldson Auditorium without stepping outside the building, and on the way 
pass the wonderful new library which links Smith and Brooks schools. As soon as the Hartwell 
building was vacated by the first and second grades, it was renovated to accommodate the 
School Administration and School Committee. 

The new and renovated buildings were dedicated at the end of April, 1996, in a grand 
two-day celebration which included an Open House on Sunday for the citizens of Lincoln to view 
the facilities and an Open Classroom on the following Tuesday when interested citizens could 
observe the classrooms in action. All the students gathered on that morning to participate in the 
dedication and to unveil the new butterfly weathervane. In the spring and summer the final 
landscaping and site work was completed. 

The contractor is still on site, gradually attending to the "punch list" construction details 
which have not yet been accepted by the Committee. In the spring of 1997, the contractor will 
add a storage shed for the Brooks School lunch tables in the rear of the Field House. This will 
finally allow the gym to be used for the upper school lunch room as was originally planned. With 
that construction, the fund appropriated at the 1993 Annual Town Meeting for the purpose of 
repairing and renovating the Lincoln Public Schools will be exhausted. 



133 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Donna Coutu 

William Hewins, Vice-Chairman 

Janet Miller 

Steve Silverman 

David Wilson 

Sarah Cannon Holden, Chairman 

Keeping in mind that these annual reports constitute a part of the history of Lincoln- 
Sudbury, we highlight the extraordinary rather than the routine events of the past year. We also 
want to mention where we are in the continuing effort to maintain a successful high school. 

Following the resignation of Matthew King as Superintendent-Principal, we undertook a 
comprehensive and open search for his replacement. We gratefully acknowledge the formal 
input received from citizens, staff and students. In May John M. Ritchie, the principal at the 
Winchester High School, was appointed. We would like to thank Dr. King for his seven fine 
years at L-S. 

Also resigning this year after many years of service was Mr. Pat Mullen who tirelessly 
built the L-S Scholarship Fund to one million dollars. Over the years many students have 
benefited from these efforts. We are most grateful for his work. 

The work of L-S 21 is on-going. We have completed the first year of the extended block 
schedule and evaluating it is now a school wide goal. The Fitness Center is heavily used by 
students, staff and community members outside of class time. The World Language, Math and 
Science Computer Labs are used daily, and the Dyad on CD ROM received national recognition. 
At the invitation of the Teachers Association, members of the School Committee spent a day in 
October in classes followed by a reception at the library. 

While our population is increasing, at a pace faster than anticipated, we are doing all 
that we can to keep class sizes reasonable. We nave 60 more students this year than last. The 
Space Committee continues to study the best utilization of space at L-S. Over the summer our 
maintenance staff renovated the space vacated by the Carroll High School which is now 
occupied primarily by L-S Central. 

Although L-S's physical plant continues to be well maintained, the need for a renovated 
Rogers Education Center persists. The present theater is well below the standards of 
excellence and safety that are important to Lincoln and Sudbury. We strongly feel that a larger, 
more functional Rogers would be a great asset to our school and communities, and continue to 
work with Sudbury's Investment Priority Committee to bring the issue before Sudbury. (Support 
has already been voted in Lincoln). 

Steve Silverman ran successfully for Fred Pryor's vacated seat on the School 
Committee. Alex Yates and Paul Kresanowski were our student representatives. We have 
recently instituted a policy of having a report from the student rep at each meeting. 

As we approach the completion of Lincoln-Sudbury's fourth decade, the School 
Committee continues to be proud of a vibrant high school where students are exposed to an 
outstanding facility and staff, and benefit from the continued support of the member towns. 



134 



ANNUAL REGIONAL DISTRICT ELECTION 



The Regional District Election was held in conjunction with the elections in Lincoln and 
Sudbury on Monday, March 25, 1996 and certifications of the results were received from Nancy 
J. Zuelke, Town Clerk of Lincoln, and Kathleen D. Middleton, Assistant Town Clerk of Sudbury, 
as follows: 

For two 3-year terms: Lincoln Sudbury Total 

Janet C. Miller 

Frances Caspe 

Stephen Silverman 

Write-ins 

Blanks 

Total 



748 


671 


1,419 


140 


454 


594 


255 


796 


1,051 




3 


3 


635 


402 


1.037 


1,778 


2,326 


4,104 



Respectfully submitted, 

Maryellen Gallagher 
District Clerk 



135 



SUPERINTENDENT - PRINCIPAL'S REPORT 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School continues to maintain and even enhance its 
reputation as an outstanding and unique public high school, with a deep commitment to 
providing excellent and appropriate programs for all of its students. 

A number of changes have taken place at L-S in recent years, and the programs and 
policies that have been instituted recently continue to contribute to the overall life of the school. 
The various LS-21 proposals, designed to shape the school for the next century, are all either 
being actively implemented or actively studied. New drama and art courses have been 
introduced, physical education courses have been reoriented towards health and fitness, a new 
block schedule, with longer classes to provide more variety in teaching strategies, has been 
introduced, and the already outstanding academic program is undergoing constant refinement. 

This year, L-S has been joined by sixteen new teachers, many of whom were hired to fill 
in for teachers on leave or on sabbatical. Energetic new staff members are a wonderful addition 
to the school culture, and a thoughtfully conceived new teacher orientation program has been 
very helpful in getting our newest colleagues acclimated to the school culture. 

As noted in last year's report, the school has continued to upgrade its technological 
resources, having added Mathematics and Science Computer Labs over the past two years, and 
most recently a technology center for the Foreign Language Department. Progress is underway 
to continue this program, with a Humanities Lab and an Art Department Lab both in the planning 
stages. Also, as any member of the school well knows, electronic mail communication forms a 
big part of both student and faculty life. 

The privatization of both the food service and cleaning service operations has been a 
real success at L-S. While we continue to evaluate these programs carefully, it is clear that 
each has resulted in significant savings to the district. Moreover, the excellent work done by the 
custodial and maintenance crews has reduced costs that would otherwise have been paid to 
contract work out. Over the past summer, classrooms were renovated, and a new space built 
for the Central programs; the fact that all the work was done internally is a source of pride and 
savings. 

Student life at Lincoln-Sudbury is purposeful and productive, with students involved in 
their academic pursuits, drama, music, art, athletics, and various social and community-service 
oriented clubs and activities. The school has a well-earned reputation for excellent and 
innovative programs, and we hope to continue our successes in the coming year. 



136 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 
CLASS OF 1996 



Jeffrey Adams 
Douglas Paul Adams, Jr. 
Christopher Alexis 
Sarah Ali 
Amanda Arenson 

Alison Ball 
Claire Selva Barnes 
Laura Bellizzi 
Melissa Bellizzi* 
Jessica Bendel 
Tracy Ellen Berkowitz 
Jennifer Berman 
Jessica Berry 
April Lee Bishop 
Mark Bisson 
Sara Bloomberg* 
Meaghan Boeing* 
Jeffrey L. Bordeaux 
Kathryn Bowser 
Timothy Brennan 
Jeremy M. Brodney 
Kanika Nyota Brown 
Carol Brozenske 
Kerri Ann Buonamico 
Ashley Burnett 

Jennifer L. Capone 
Jerry Cavallerano 
Wesley Charles Clapp 
Voeung Chau 
Theresa Ann Coffeen 
Jillian Cohen 
Jeremy Todd Cohen 
Jonathan Cole 
Abbie Connoy 
Jennifer Coogan 
Jessica Elizabeth Corkin 
Jehan Coutu 
Christopher Crosby 

Steven Dansereau 
William H. Darling 
Paul Dealy 
Kimberlee R. Dean 
Jacques D. Delori 
Robert DeWallace 
Jeffrey DeWallace 
Saritha Dhruvakumar* 
Adrianna DiDomenico 



Whitney Breckinridge Drake' 
Zachary L. Driscoll 
Kristen Drobinski 
Lars Drummond 
Wayne du Plessis 
Benjamin N. Duvall 

Carolyn Evans 
Julie Evans* 

Justin Adam Fantasia 
Julia Wallace Feldman 
Liza A. Feldman* 
Robert Flavell 
Robert Fleming III 
Kianna Fowlkes 

Elizabeth Amy Galburt 
Patrick Garrity 
Christopher Gaumnitz 
Kevin Rory Gelsinon 
Elizabeth Gennaro 
Alexandra Gilmore* 
Dawan Glover 
Rebecca Faye Goldberg 
Joseph Greenstein* 
Graham C. Grindlay 
Susan Gross 
Stephen Grossman 
Derek Gustafson 

Melody Hachey 

Caitlin B. Haggerty 

Kimberly S. Hamill 

Tanesha D. Hammond 

Bradford Hayami 

Ryan Robert Dawson Heald 

Alison Healy* 

Sarah Elizabeth Healy 

Gillian Heckman 

Michael John Helgeson 

Jennifer Hickey* 

Cynthia Hogan 

Edward Howey 

Matthew Hunt 

Adrian lonescu 
Jill M. Ireland 
Jennifer llene Isenberg 



137 



Maya Jairam 
Watson Jean-Denis 
Bridgett L. Jennings 
Cheylan Jones 
Audrey Elizabeth Juliano 

Michael Kagey 
Sele'Fana Kamau 
Andrea Kamins 
Emily Kaplan 
Dana Katter* 
Jonathan Kiburz* 
Michael King 
Eva Sutherland Klein 
Sarah Elise Knight 
Michaela Kocis 
Andrew Koyfman 
Daniel Kramer 
Rony Kubat 

Eric LaHaise 
Steven Andrew Larkin 
Aaron Levy 
Danielle Lief 
Benjamin S. Lipsey 
David Loos 
Jody Ann Lukens-Bober 

Elizabeth S. MacNeil* 
Sean Maher 
Megan L. Malatesta 
Anne Marcklinger 
Eddie A. McBrayer, Jr. 
Christopher McCann 
Christine McCarthy* 
Matthew McConnon 
Stefan McSweeney 
Benjamin Meshon 
Megan Vera Messina 
Nicholas W. Miller 
Jamie Miller 
Brian Miller 
Daniel Mirman* 
Tara Misra 

Christopher K. Modoono 
Kenneth Monahan 
Neal Morgan 
Amy Moriarty 
Michael Morris 
Brian Morrissey 
George Mullin 

Laith Naoum 
Rana Naoum 



Michael Navisky 
Sofya Nembhard 
Mark Nesky* 
Khanh Nguyen 
Rachel Anne Noe 
Daniel A. Noonan 

Coley O'Donnell 
Lesley Oakes 

Heather Palin 
Seth L. Parker 
Michael Pierson 
Michael Pimentel 
Gregory Piatt 
Robin Elaine Powers 
David Priest 

Eric Resnick 
Alison Rettman 
Peter Rhome 
Margo Jeanne Rice 
Curtis A. Risley 
Ivy Michelle Risser 
Ben Rose 
Joseph M. Ross 
Conor Andrew Runge 
Diana Rusch 

Stacey Salomon 
Emily Wintzer Schaeffer* 
Anna Scheinfeld 
Adrienne Schiavi 
Juliette Schwartz 
Brenda J. Segien 
Amalia Serafim 
Rebecca Shaw 
Andrea Danette Shellman 
Sean Shields 
Eugene Sigalovsky 
Shirin Sioshansi* 
Gilliam Marie Skulte 
Keisha Smith 
Ryan Smith 
Miriam Speert 
Mary Kathleen Stam 
Sarah Emily Stein 
Elizabeth Ralston Swank 

Kalah Ann Talancy 
Cynthia Sophie Tang 
John Taranto 
Kevin Ten Brinke 
Vinod Tharian 



138 



Derek Thompson 
Johnna Thomsen 
Rebecca Trail 
Andrew Tsou* 
Matthew Alan Tulman 

Elizabeth Varghese 

Dale Walker 
Joanna Ward 
Ronald Ward 
Casey Welch* 
Scott Wiadro 
Megan Wilson 
Jason Michael Wren 
David Wright 
Amanda Wright 

Alexandra W. Yates* 

Catharine Zink 
Zachary Zito 

*Cum Laude Society 



139 



DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS ATTENDING REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
AS OF OCTOBER 1,1996 



1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 



Lincoln 


99 


102 


109 


124 


141 


Sudbury 


710 


704 


691 


721 


756 


METCO 


73 


71 


68 


75 


79 


Other (Tuition) 


ia 


18 


19 


19 


20 


Total 


901 


895 


887 


939 


996 


Boys 


430 


427 


434 


468 


518 


Girls 


4Z1 


468 


453 


4Z1 


478 


Total 


901 


895 


887 


939 


996 


9th Grade 


230 


227 


226 


268 


253 


10th Grade 


217 


228 


234 


229 


274 


11th Grade 


235 


226 


226 


232 


237 


12th Grade 


219 


214 


201 


210 


232 



Total 901 895 887 939 996 

Tuition Pupils 

Attending Other 

Schools 23 18 24 25 28 



140 



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141 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Treasurer's Report 
July 1, 1995 through June 30, 1996 

Pauline M. Paste, Business Manager/Treasurer 

Total Cash Balance. July 1. 1995 $ 



1,982,681.04 



District Fund 



Cash Balance. July 1.1995 



RECEIPTS: 






OPERATING ACCOUNTS 






Sudbury Assessment 


7,786,287.79 




Lincoln Assessment 


1,201,420.71 




TOTAL ASSESSMENTS 




8,987,708.50 


Chapter 70 


1,341,562.00 




Transportation Aid 


171,237.00 




TOTAL STATE AID 




1,512,799.00 


ANTICIPATED RECEIPTS 


185,606.00 


185,606.00 


Miscellaneous Income 


132,216.15 




Petty Cash Refund 


1,000.00 




Stabilization 


12,048.55 




Tailings 


789.00 




TOTAL SUNDRY INCOME 




146,053.70 


TOTAL OPERATING RECEIPTS 




10,832,167.20 


DEDUCTION ACCOUNTS: 






Federal Withholding Tax 


900,095.74 




Massachusetts Withholding Tax 


369,275.47 




Federal Withholding Tax FICA 


46,620.50 




Health Insurance 


177,251.31 




MA Teachers' Retirement 


361,985.25 




Middlesex County Retirement 


108,344.92 




Disability Insurance 


46,848.39 




Tax Sheltered Annuities 


308,369.87 




Credit Union 


391,382.00 




L-S Teachers' Association 


35,798.10 




Deferred Compensation 


10,745.98 




Section 125, Flexible Spending Plans 


56,019.74 




United Way 


872.0Q 




TOTAL DEDUCTION RECEIPTS 




2,813,609.27 


TOTAL DISTRICT FUND RECEIPTS 


$ 


13,645,776.47 


TOTAL DISTRICT FUND INCOME 


$ 


14,596,266.38 

— —■— — — 



142 



DISBURSEMENTS: 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 
Operating Budget 
Equipment Budget 
Capital Projects 
Debt Service - principal 
Debt Service - interest 

TOTAL BUDGET DISBURSEMENTS 

FY '95 ENCUMBRANCE 

PETTY CASH ADVANCE 



0,112,653.11 




135,589.55 




250,000.00 




62,612.50 






10,560,855.16 


11,559.95 


11,559.95 


1 ,000.00 


1,000.00 



EXCESS & DEFICIENCY FUND 



TAILINGS 



3,850.00 



3,850.00 



DEDUCTION ACCOUNTS: 

Federal Withholding Tax 
Massachusetts Withholding Tax 
Federal Withholding Tax FICA 
Health Insurance 
MA Teachers' Retirement 
Middlesex County Retirement 
Disability Insurance 
Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Credit Union 

L-S Teachers' Association 
Deferred Compensation 
Section 125, Flexible Spending Plans 
United Way 
TOTAL DEDUCTION DISBURSEMENTS 



900,095.74 

369,275.47 

46,620.50 

168,492.42 

361,985.25 

108,344.92 

52,089.02 

308,369.87 

391,382.00 

35,825.50 

10,745.98 

56,019.74 

872.00 



2,810,118.41 



TOTAL DISTRICT FUND DISBURSEMENTS 

CASH BALANCE DISTRICT FUND 
JUNE 30, 1995 



13,387,383.52 



1,208,882.86 



CASH BALANCE REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 
ON JUNE 30, 1995 



549,113.52 



TOTAL CASH BALANCE JUNE 30, 1996 



1,757,996.38 



143 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30, 1996 

ASSETS 

Bank of Boston Bid 558,743.32 

Bank of Boston Checking 23,950.22 

Baybank Payroll 250,451 .41 

MMDT 927,118.81 

Boston Safe 12,048.55 

Boston Safe 1 56,607.1 8 

Boston Safe (170,923.11) 

TOTAL ASSETS 1 ,757,996.38 

LIABILITIES & RESERVES 

SURPLUS REVENUE (reserved for Assessments) 877,121.29 

EXCESS & DEFICIENCY 280,169.50 

STABILIZATION REVENUE 1 2,048.55 

TAILINGS 1,835.28 

Disability Insurance 3,747.85 

Health Insurance 33,987.79 

Teacher Dues (27.40) 

Adult Education 4,215.79 

Athletics 8,999.82 

Building Use 19,345.11 

Cafeteria 60,052.46 

Capital Outlay 9,051 .67 

Computer Contract 5,174.25 

Damage to School Property (258.64) 

Donations 38,639.12 

Fitness Center User Fees 1 ,01 4.00 

Library Copy Machine 5,075.80 

Lost Books 13,532.49 

Medical Claims Trust Fund 1 56,870.98 

Medicaid 48,868.00 

Nursery School 15,368.58 

Tuition 163,1 $4.09 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 1 ,757,996.38 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 

School Bonds 

(final payment 8/1 5/03, 3.77% interest) 1 ,580,000.00 

TOTAL DEBT 1 ,580,000.00 



144 



EXCESS & DEFICIENCY FUND 

Cash Balance July 1 , 1 995 205, 1 69.50 

Approved Transfer 75,000.00 

Disbursements -__ 

Cash Balance on June 30, 1 996 280, 1 69.50 



STABILIZATION FUND 

Voted establishment spring town meeting 1 992 

FY '96 Funding 11,562.00 

Interest Income 486.55 

Cash Balance on June 30, 1 996 1 2,048.55 



MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 

Interest Income 119,226.15 

Telephone 925.82 

Miscellaneous Refunds 2,081.54 

FY 95 Sundry 9,982.64 

132,216.15 

ANTICIPATED RECEIPTS 

Athletic User Fees 1 01 ,675.00 

Athletic Gate Receipts 5,000.00 

Building Rental 78,931.00 

185,606.00 



145 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 

Mikki Lipsey 

Linda Pejchar 

Jim Birmingham, Chairman 

The purpose of the Lincoln Scholarship Committee is to provide critical marginal funding 
to Lincoln high school seniors, whether in private or public schools, as they segue into the world 
of higher education. Applications from high school seniors are accepted until early April. The 
Committee interviews all applicants in late Spring, and allocates available resources to those 
deserving students most in need. 

In 1996, thanks to the generosity of the Town's citizens, businesses and churches, we 
were able to provide much needed freshman year aid to two students. We are sincerely 
appreciative of these contributions, and of the portfolio management provided by the 
Commissioners of Trust Funds. Interest income provides a significant portion of the funds 
available for distribution each year. 

For many years the Trustees of the Ogden Codman Trust have been very generous in 
providing a "matching" donation to the Lincoln Scholarship Fund, which doubles the impact of all 
contributions made by others. On behalf of the students, we are thankful, and ask for your 
continued support and kind generosity. 



146 



LINCOLN SUDBURY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, INC. 



Eileen Berkel 


Sudbury 


Member 


Mark Dakss 


Sudbury 


Director 


Thomas Danko 


Faculty 


Member 


Evelyn Keily 


Lincoln 


Member 


Ann Kramer 


Sudbury 


Member 


Alice Levine 


Sudbury 


Member 


Kate Levine 


Sudbury 


Student Rep 


Karen Mahoney 


Sudbury 


Member 


Eileen McEleney 


Sudbury 


Member 


Annalisa Notaro 


Faculty 


Secretary 


Emil Ragones 


Sudbury 


Treasurer 


Gisele Sampson 


Faculty 


Director 


Mary Jane Sanders 


Sudbury 


Coordinator 


Betty Smith 


Lincoln 


Member 


David Wilson 


Sudbury 


Director 


David Wright 


Sudbury 


Student Rep 


Patrick Mullen 


Sudbury 


President 



In May 1987, Virginia Kirshner, an English and Drama teacher at LSRHS, had a dream 
of a $1,000,000 endowment to fund scholarships for graduating seniors. The program at that 
time was a mail solicitation program across the towns of Lincoln and Sudbury. It yielded $4,000 
and Springthing generated $5,000. Clearly this was not meeting the needs. Since the cost of 
education was rising rapidly, Virginia said we had to do more both in the number and size of 
scholarships. In 1988, the Lincoln Sudbury Scholarship Fund was established and a campaign 
to raise $1,000,000 launched. Thanks to the generosity of the residents of Lincoln and Sudbury, 
support from businesses such as Chiswick and Raytheon, and help from the Sudbury 
Foundation in the form of $250,000 in matching funds, the endowment had a market value of 
$1,031,637 at the end of this fiscal year. Unfortunately, over the same period, the cost of 
education at a private college increased 93%. Said another way, the $1,031,637 is worth 
$534,527 in 1987 dollars. Based on this, the Directors of the Fund have decided to continue the 
fall campaign comprised of direct mail and a phonathon as a way to meet the increasing needs 
of our graduates. Our goal is to increase the value of the scholarships awarded. 

Scholarships are funded by the net earnings of the endowment and the direct proceeds 
of Springthing. Additional scholarships are solicited from businesses. 

A faculty committee selects the recipients based on the following criteria: need, 
academic achievement and community involvement. The fund is available to Lincoln-Sudbury 
senior class members with definite college plans. 



147 



The recipients of the 1996 scholarships awards were: 

Lincoln-Sudbury Scholarship Fund Scholarships 



Melissa Bellizzi 
Saritha Dhruvakumar 
Maya Jairam 
Ronny Kubat 
Laith Naoum 
Kevin Ten Brinke 
Dale Walker 



Voeung Chau 
Lars Drummond 
Eva Klein 
Sean Maher 
Rana Naoum 
Andrew Tsou 
Joanna Ward 



Named Scholarships 



Andrew Koyfman 
Eric LaHaise 
Amalia Serafim 
Jennifer Coogan 
Whitney Drake 
Mark Nesky 
Alexandra Yates 
John Taranto 
Jennifer Coogan 
Joanna Thompson 
Robin Powers 
Jennifer Hickey 
Jillian Hickey 
Jennifer Isenberg 
Jody Lukens-Bober 
Tara Misera 
Laura Bellizzi 
Daniel Mirman 
Elizabeth Varghese 
Kahn Nguyen 
Kimberly Hamill 
Kevin Ten Brink 



Bramwell B. Arnold Physics Award 

Citizens' Scholarship Foundation of America 

Charles Hotel at Harvard Square Scholarship 

Malcolm L. and Eleanor L. Donaldson Scholarship 

Sheri Dakks Scholarship 

High Tech Council Classic Road Race Scholarship 

Frank Hayes Memorial Scholarship 

Middlesex Savings Bank Scholarship 

John R. Kirshner Memorial History Scholarship 

Virginia K. Kirshner Memorial Scholarship 

Massport Scholarship 

Edward J. McCarthy Memorial Scholarship 

Ninty-Nine Restaurant Scholarship 

Frank Pirrello Sr. Memorial Scholarship 

Frank Pirrello Sr. Memorial Scholarship 

Ambika Ramachandra Foundation Scholarship 

Ravi Shankar Hoskere Memorial Scholarship 

Raytheon Company Scholarship 

Lily T. Spooner Memorial Scholarship 

Sudbury Foundation Scholarship 

Robert Wentworth Music Award Scholarship 

John K. Wirzburger Memorial Scholarship 



148 



LINCOLN SUDBURY SCHOLARSHIP FUND, INC. 
STATEMENT OF REVENUE, EXPENDITURES AND FUND BALANCE 



Revenue Years Ended 6/30 1996 1995 1994 



Matching Funds Received 
Contributions 
Investment Income 
Springthing 


$ 


1,615 
61,714 
69,776 

4,000 


$ 


2,093 
60,510 
38,522 

5,000 


$ 


51,022 

53,800 

32,728 

7,500 


Total Revenue 


$ 


137,105 


$ 


106,125 


$ 


145,050 


Expenditures 

Total Scholarships Awarded 
Provisions for uncollectable 
pledges 




50,950 


$ 


33,600 

202 

33,802 


$ 


35,400 
1,885 


Total Program Services 


$ 


50,950 


37,285 


Supporting Services 

Operating Expenses 




11,794 




13,545 




19,141 





74,361 
1.699 


58,778 
40.696 


88,624 
(9,231) 


$ 


76,060 $ 


99,474 $ 


80,393 


$ 


982,727 $ 


906,667 $ 


807,193 



Total Expenditures $ 62,744 $ 47,347 $ 56,426 

Excess of revenue and support 
over expenses before net gains 
(losses) on securities 
Net gains (losses) on securities 

Excess for year 
Fund Balance Ending 

Investments presented in the 
aggregate at the lower cost of 
(amortized in the case of bonds) 
or fair market value. 

For information concerning the Lincoln-Sudbury Scholarship Fund, Inc., call the 
Regional High School at 443-9961 or Emil Ragones at 443-2943. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Patrick J. Mullen 

President, Lincoln-Sudbury Scholarship Fund, Inc. 



149 



Acton 


Robert Wiltse, Chairperson 


Arlington 


Liz McNenny 


Belmont 


Joseph White 


Bolton 


Anita M. Ware 


Boxborough 


Kenneth Whitcomb 


Carlisle 


William Churchill 


Concord 


John McCarthy 


Dover 


Frank Gobbi, Jr. 


Lancaster 


Shawn Winsor 


Lexington 


Jane Pagett 


Lincoln 


Sally Bobbitt, Secretary 


Needham 


Kenneth D. Mullen, Jr. 


Stow 


Frances Hyden 


Sudbury 


Glenn L. Noland, Vice-Chairperson 


Wayland 


Dorothy G. Pesek 


Weston 


Joseph J. Gazzola 



MINUTEMAN SCIENCE-TECHNOLOGY HIGH SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Term 
Expires 
1997 
1997 
1998 
1999 
1997 
1997 
1998 
1999 
1997 
1999 
1998 
1998 
1999 
1998 
1999 
1999 

Over 20 years ago, visionaries from 16 towns formed an alliance to found a vocational 
high school (now Minuteman Science-Technology High School) in this region. Each town 
committed to pay a certain share of the costs, and each town was assigned a quota of students it 
could send to the school. It soon became clear that some towns (such as Arlington) exceeded its 
quota, while others (such as Lincoln) sent far fewer students than its quota would allow. While 
the regional commitment remains, Lincoln's underutilization of its quota (one graduate in 1996) 
represents a problem for the town, not the school. If Lincoln were to increase its attendance at 
Minuteman, its assessment would increase very little - and the cost per pupil would, of course, 
decrease. The following report contains some information that, hopefully, will redirect parent and 
pupil interest to this wonderful resource in our own backyard. 

Minuteman's growing emphasis is on academic excellence (one student became 
Minuteman's first national semi-finalist in the National Merit Scholarship competition last year) 
and preparation for college, which a majority of graduates now attend. A recent study completed 
by the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern shows that post high school learning 
combined with specific career training makes graduates very attractive to employers. With its 
many advanced credit contracts with local colleges, Minuteman's strong academic and technical 
programs are paying great dividends to graduates. 

With only 15% of available Massachusetts jobs in manufacturing in 1990 (down from 
40% in 1950), the majority of the best jobs of the future can now be found in technical, 
professional, managerial, and high level sales careers, in the "service" sector. Focusing on this 
evolution, Minuteman now prepares biotechnicians, environmental technicians, 
telecommunication workers, electromechanical specialists, builders trained in energy saving, 
graphics technicians with computer skills, craft and sales workers who are very computer literate, 
etc. - all with preparation for continued learning in college, business-industry programs, and 
beyond. Students must be ready for the careers of tomorrow, not the careers of yesterday. 

In connection with career preparation, Minuteman has taken the leadership role in a new 
Metro South West School-to-Careers Consortium, in partnership with all of this district's feeder 
junior high and high schools, Regional Employment Boards, the Department of Employment and 
Training, and private industry members. Their programs provide access to private industry 
employment, specific training, and shadowing for students. In Minuteman's case, a mentor 



150 



program is being developed. Career awareness, readiness, and experience serve to make 
Minuteman graduates eminently employable, whether directly from school or after college 
studies. An effort to model integration of applied learning and an interdisciplinary approach to 
curriculum is underway in a School-to-Careers program reaching into the Consortium's feeder 
schools (approximately 36,000 students) with the aid of a million dollar 3 year grant. Other grants 
have supported funding for the expansion of a new science-technology career training. 

The school can attract important funding and equipment support because it has received 
international recognition, and national awards from the U.S. Secretary of Education for its 
outstanding technical programs. The school regularly attracts visitors and educators from other 
states and abroad who wish to duplicate its programs. A high level of credibility has resulted 
from its excellent level of evaluation for positive student impact. Honors for achievement in state 
and national VICA competitions (many gold medals), the New England Flower Show (many blue 
ribbons), DECA conferences, athletic championships in soccer, wrestling, basketball and softball, 
are legion. Early Childhood majors recently won a U.S. Department of Agriculture team nutrition 
competition. 

Closer to home, the school's enrollment is at capacity, with a long waiting list. There has 
been a 22% rise in member town freshman (under the CHOICE program, seats not filled from 
the 16 member towns can be used by communities outside the region). Highlights for 1996 
include: a new telecommunications program with sophisticated and updated equipment leading 
to a new Telecommunications educational major; for students who need support in achieving 
higher success in reading and math skills, programs are available to help the average student 
gain more than 3 to 4 years in demonstrated increased reading skills in a matter of months. 
(Each entering student is tested for his/her learning style). Whether preparing for a job after high 
school or further education, it is essential that students be capable of reading technically 
advanced manuals and of making sophisticated calculations. Finally, the school is in the first 
year of a 3 year program to network the school and facilitate Internet capability. 

With all these advances, it is important to note that, in addition to providing a 
comprehensive education to day students, Minuteman resources are available to post graduates 
and adults, at no cost to in-district residents. A course in cable technician training, for example, 
is currently offered at a tuition of $5,000, but residents of the 16 towns pay nothing. Such 
community outreach reflects Minuteman Science-Technology High School's educational 
commitment to lifetime learning, a cornerstone of its vision and philosophy. 

During the past year, the School Committee was saddened by the death of long-time 
member Fred Reed of Lancaster. Two very dedicated, long-time members left the School 
Committee: former Chairpersons Nyles Barnert of Lexington and Elaine Sweeney of Wayland. 
Also leaving the Committee was Herbert Yood of Belmont. The district thanks all of these people 
for their years of service. 



151 



ENROLLMENT OCTOBER 1, 1996 



TOWN 



2000 



im. 



192S 



1997 Percentage TOTAL 



Acton 

Arlington 

Belmont 

Bolton 

Boxborough 

Carlisle 

Concord 

Dover 

Lancaster 

Lexington 

Lincoln 

Needham 

Stow 

Sudbury 

Wayland 

Weston 

Tuition 

Choice 



4 
32 

13 
6 
1 

7 

7 
11 

12 
9 
6 
1 
1 

28 
104 



4 
41 
7 
1 

2 
6 
1 

11 
9 

4 
4 
3 

1 

54 
89 



4 

26 
6 
2 
2 
1 
5 

2 
7 
2 
11 
5 
4 
2 

51 
64 



2 

22 
8 

2 
1 

10 

3 
5 
2 
6 
11 
6 
1 

54 
32 



7 

20 
12 
4 
1 
4 
6 
1 
5 

19 
2 
3 
1 
2 
3 
5 

32 
Q 



21 
141 
46 
13 

6 

8 
34 

2 

28 
51 

6 
36 
30 
21 

7 

7 
219 
290 



TOTAL 



242 



237 



194 



166 



127 



966 



CLASS OF 1996 
MINUTEMAN TECH 

Jennifer Hagopian 



152 



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154 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION 
VITAL STATISTICS 

43 births, 33 marriages and 33 deaths have been recorded during the year 1996 as follows: 

BIRTHS 



Name of Child 



Name of Parents 



13 
22 



Isaac Thompson Higgins 
Kacey Mae Green 
Caroline Xavier Hardie 
Jennifer Mary Genovese 
Grace Ann Connaughton 
John Conor Meehan Holway 
Samuel John Higgins 
Gregory Steven Sachs 



Neil & Mary Higgins 
Scott & Cynthia Green 
Michael Hardie & Susan Harvey 
Joseph & Linda Genovese 
John & Genevieve Connaughton 
David & Theresa Holway 
Peter & Bonnie Higgins 
Gary & Maryanne Sachs 



7 
12 



16 

24 

1 

3 

3 

15 



1 

8 

9 

10 



Nicholas John Manos 

Clara Connell Clough 

Delaney Victoria Row 

Duncan Ross McCoy Norton 

James William Nugent, II 

Jordan David Yanaowitz 

Connor Michael McCann 

Emily Boardman Kelman 

Christopher Duncan Cassano 

Charles Edward King 

Dannia Maria Asfour 

Vincent Frank Panetta 

Amy Elizabeth Stoddard 

Caroline Churchill Cort 

Jeremy Evan Dobrow Vale 

Caroline Campbell Jahrling 

Kaylee Michelle Finn-Henry 

Margaret Jessen Edlund Butler 

Alicia Brigid Collura 

Miles Pieter Von Herrmann 

Devon Jaclynn McGinty 

Emu Emily Kato 

Sarah Anne Nathaniel 

Christian Eric Reenstierna, Jr. 

Jonathan Russell Eckel 

Nichole Marie Cummings 

Phoebe Elizabeth O'Hagan Chatfield 

Olivia Lansdale O'Hagan Chatfield 



Christopher & Laurie Manos 

Paul & Kelly Clough 

Frank & Eileen Row 

Charles Norton & Megan McCoy 

James &Sheila Nugent 

Joel Yanowitz & Amy Metzenbaum 

Peter & Ellen McCann 

Jonathan Kelman & Pamela Boardman 

Michael & Heather Cassano 

Charles King, & Anne Hulecki 

Youssef Asfour & Brenda Noens-Asfour 

Paul & Kelley Panetta 

Robert Stoddard & Susan Sajer 

Clifford & Carey Cort 

Lawrence Vale & Julia Dobrow 

Robert & Catherine Jahrling 

Timothy Henry & Alice Finn 

Colin Butler & Margaret Edlund 

Joseph & Sharon Collura 

Timothy & Susan Von Herrmann 

Robert & Kerry McGinty 

Yukio & Hisae Kato 

Robert Nathaniel & Christine Hanlon 

Christian & Paula Reenstierna 

Richard Eckel & Cathy Mara 

Brian & Rhonda Cummings 

Alexander Chatfield & Patricia O'Hagan 
Alexander Chatfield & Patricia O'Hagan 



Peter Liam Crean 



Finbar & Marion Crean 



155 



Date of 

Birth Name of Child Name of Parents 

Sept. 22 Patrick Scully McNally James & Laura McNally 

Sept. 24 Lucas Michael Hitchcock Michael & Nancy Hitchcock 

Oct 7 Savannah Elizabeth Snell John Snell & Janet Flory 

Oct. 9 Robert Winthrop McKean, Jr. Robert & Sandra McKean 

Oct. 10 Jessica Hailey Timmer Jurrien Timmer & Deborah Quirk-Timmer 

Oct 12 Micaela Mersereau Dickinson John & Pamela Dickinson 

Oct. 17 Clara Carmichael Cousins Daniel & Sarah Cousins 

Oct. 26 Brian Patrick Kelly Brian Kelly & Patricia Kaneb 

Nov. 6 Elliott Deem Ross Robert Ross, III & Susan Elliott 

Nov. 8 Raewyn Amelia Fairless Bruce Fairless & Carol Ryan 

Nov. 19 Liam Patrick McHale William McHale, Jr. & Ellen Kelley-McHale 

Nov. 29 Acia Veronica Gankin Yuriy & Lioubov Gankin 

Nov. 29 Logan Gilbert Engstrom Harold & Lynda Engstrom 

Dec. 7 Eve Georgia Gordon Bradley & Johanna Gordon 

Dec. 12 Leah Sabin Kanzer William & Deborah Kanzer 



156 



MARRIAGES 



Names 



Residence 



Thaddeus Reamy Gillespie 
Elizabeth Seward Padjen 
Martin Neumayer 
Dawn Maureen Jennings 
Michael Edward Najjar 
Michelle Marie Krazmein 
Finbar Joseph Crean 
Marion Paisley Evans 
Peter James Nusbaum 
Joanna Margot Flores 
Jon Lee Ashburn 
Sharon Patricia Austin 
Tony Lawrence Goldberg 
Robin Meredith Hadley 
Blase William Provitola 
Julie Reid Summers 
Andrew Finch 
Regina Ann LaRosa 
Anthony George Liepert 
Sarah Plagenz 
Cameron Scott Avery 
Lynn Burrows Donaldson 
Stephen Pinney Thomas 
Patricia Christine Montemayor 
Charles Fessenden Morse 
Jeanne K. MacMillan 
Stephen Dorn Hartline 
Deborah Duncan Gilmore 
Michael Sean Glazier 
Alexandra Kim Klickstein 
James Arthur Pappas 
Lessie Elaine Thiele 
James Thomas Julian 
Shannon Elissa Bartlett 
Robert Bruce Bearchell 
Gillian Rose Titus 
Graham Thomas Walker 
Emily Barry Lovering 
Ben M. Mutschler 
Susan Lynne Aldine 
David R. Young 
Marcianna Pianka 
Edmund Conrad Neuhaus 
Elizabeth Christina Torres 
Stephen Joseph Yankum, Jr. 
Judith C. Pistorio 



Lincoln, MA 
Salem, MA 

Gaenserndorf, Austria 
Vienna, Austria 
New York, NY 
New York, NY 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Los Angeles, CA 
Los Angeles, CA 
Ft. Collins, CO 
Ft. Collins, CO 
Cambridge, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Belmont, MA 
Belmont, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Winnetka, IL 
Lincoln, MA 
Boston, MA 
Boston, MA 
Wayland, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Boston, MA 
Boston, MA 
Boston, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Hyannis, MA 
Hyannis, MA 
Sharon, MA 
Medford, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Bedford, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 



157 



Date of 






Marriaae 


Names 


Residence 


Sept. 22 


Justin Jarrett Dore 


Boulder, CO 




Stacey Lee Redden 


Boulder, CO 


Sept. 26 


Wesley M.Simmons 


Lincoln, MA 




Dayana Brill 


Lincoln, MA 


Sept. 28 


Michael Curtis 


Lincoln, MA 




Denyce C. Crowley 


Lincoln, MA 


Oct. 5 


David Franklin Sykes 


Lincoln, MA 




Dorene Bodenstedt Woodrow 


Lincoln, MA 


Oct. 18 


Kenneth A. Birse 


Dunstable, MA 




Carole Patricia Sullivan 


Dunstable, MA 


Oct. 19 


Gilles Eric Bommart 


Boston, MA 




Karen Jill Schiff 


Boston, MA 


Oct. 19 


Samuel Issac Rappaport 


Lincoln, MA 




Lauren Herbert 


Lincoln, MA 


Nov. 8 


Alvaro Antonio Fallas 


Boston, MA 




Anna Beatriz Chacon 


Lincoln, MA 


Nov. 23 


Christopher James Newcombe 


Lincoln, MA 




Kathryn Mary Manuel 


Boston, MA 


Dec. 20 


Stephen Gerard Grimes 


Lincoln, MA 




Hema Shasta 


Lincoln, MA 



158 







DEATHS 


Date of 






Death 


Names 


Years 


1995 






Sept. 20 


Robert Wesley Stecher 


74 


Dec. 8 


Phillip Smith 


69 


Dec. 26 


Abraham L. Lankhorst 


76 


1996 






Jan. 3 


Hope Sparre Skinner 


86 


Jan. 13 


Katherine J. Kelleher 


60 


Jan. 16 


Fannie Yurick 


101 


Jan. 25 


Wat Henry Tyler 


91 


Jan. 25 


Graham S. Riley 


27 


Feb. 6 


Anna S. Merrill 


95 


Feb. 9 


Daniel A. Spaeth 


70 


Feb. 25 


Jason Robinson Dailey 


15 


Feb. 27 


Christopher W. Barkas 


80 


Mar. 15 


Carolyn Angell 


80 


Mar. 22 


Augusta Flaherty 


100 


Apr. 6 


Judith Ann Boynton 


49 


Apr. 6 


Frank J. Graziano 


73 


Apr. 10 


Ruby M. Dixon 


89 


Apr. 23 


Violet Varsenig Minasian 


92 


Apr. 24 


Harold Kaye 


83 


May 2 


Converse B. Smith 


80 


May 20 


Galen David Light, Jr. 


83 


July 3 


Norman Francis Brisson 


88 


July 11 


Marcella Mary Fusillo 


32 


July 23 


Julann S. Smith 


70 


Aug. 10 


Charles A. Snelling 


88 


Aug. 11 


Lucas Donald Bartlett 


5 


Sept. 5 


Ellen A. Schwartz 


62 


Sept. 20 


Arthur E. Rappoli 


79 


Sept. 23 


George F. Garmory 


87 


Oct. 5 


Virginia Umbrello 


93 


Oct. 16 


Roger Poole Baldwin 


77 


Nov. 16 


Richard F. Schroeder 


87 


Nov. 24 


Alice E. Ryan 


73 


Dec. 12 


Beverly P. Lankhorst 


75 


Dec. 13 


Rita I. Panetta 


72 


Dec. 23 


William Francis Murphy 


90 



159 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Stephen V. Gray 
Virginia M. Niles 
Conrad H. Todd, Chairman 

During fiscal year 1996, which ended June 30, 1996, the principal, income and bequests 
available for future investment were invested in U.S. Treasury securities. The policy of selecting 
various maturity dates to provide flexibility with respect to the investment needs of each trust was 
continued again this past fiscal year. 

Individual statements of each trust fund for the year ending June 30 1996 are submitted 
with this report. 



160 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 

Administered by three elected Trustees. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1 995 $ 1 1 ,840.1 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 3,052.52 

Coupon Interest 120.00 

Securities Matured 5,000.00 



Payments: 

Expenses 

Purchase Securities 
Accrued Interest 
Transaction Fee 


$20,012.62 

10,830.01 

4,981.25 

15.15 

10.00 



$15,836.41 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 $ 4,176.21 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 4,176.21 

$1 ,000 U.S. Treasury 8.00% 10/15/96 977.82 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.50% 5/1 5/97 2,965.31 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.75% 10/15/97 3,000.00 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 12/31/97 3,000.00 

$6,000 U.S. Treasury 7.125% 10/15/98 6,000.00 

$6,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 6,000.00 

$8,000 U.S. Treasury 5.50% 4/15/00 7,405.00 

$5,000 U.S. Treasury 5.25% 1/31/01 4,981 .25 

$9,000 U.S. Treasury 6.375% 8/1 5/02 8,490.96 

$46,996.55 

Accumulated Income 14,869.48 

Principal 32,127.07 

$46,996.55 



161 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUND 

Administered by the Cemetery Commissioners. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 
Sale of Lots 
Securities Matured 



Payments: 



Expenses to Boston Survey Company 
Transfer to Town per Town Meeting Vote 
Purchase Securities 
Accrued Interest 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.00% 10/15/96 
$5,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 8/31/97 
$25,000 U.S. Treasury 6.75% 6/30/99 
$3,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 7.50% 5/15/02 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



$31,701.65 



5,099.71 

6,807.50 

5,000.00 

$48,608.86 



5,708.87 

700.00 

5,054.69 

91.48 

$11,555.04 

$37,053.82 



37,053.82 
9,778.10 
5,032.82 

24,757.81 

3,000.00 

9,815.60 

$89,438.15 

34,726.20 

54,711.95 

$89,438.15 



162 





120.81 




1,000.00 


$ 


1,818.90 




1,016.25 




5.89 


$ 


1,022.14 


$ 


796.76 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 $ 698.09 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 
Securities Matured 



Payments: 

Purchase Securities 
Accrued Interest 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund $ 796.76 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 6.125% 5/15/98 1,016.25 

$ 1,813.01 

Accumulated Income $ 587.96 

Principal 1 ,225.05 

$ 1,813.01 

LINCOLN STABILIZATION FUND 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 $ 216,160.76 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 13,365.92 

Transfer from General Fund 168,036.00 

$ 397,562.68 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 $ 397,562.68 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 397,562.68 

Accumulated Income $ 397,562.68 



163 



JOHN TODD TRUST FUND 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen and the Bemis Lecture Trustees. 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 


$ 1,966.90 


Receipts: 




Interest Income 


2,314.85 




$ 4,281.75 


Payments: 




None 


0.00 


Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 


$ 4,281.75 


Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 


MMDT Composite Trust Fund 


4,281.75 


$2,000 U.S. Treasury 6.875% 3/31/97 


2,000.00 


$5,000 U.S. Treasury 8.50% 5/15/97 


5,000.00 


$3,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 


3,000.00 


$14,000 U.S. Treasury 6.375% 8/15/02 


13,208.10 


$5,000 U.S. Treasury 8.75% 11/15/08 


5,000.00 




$32,489.85 


Accumulated Income 


$ 2,314.85 


Principal 


30,175.00 




$32,489.85 



164 



TRICENTENNIAL TRUST FUND 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 
Securities Matured 

Payments: 

Securities Purchased 
Accrued Interest 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 1 ,568.27 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 6.1 25% 5/1 5/98 3,048.75 

$ 4,617.02 

Accumulated Income 3,617.02 

Principal 1,000.00 

$ 4,617.02 






$ 


1,313.08 




321.61 




3,000.00 


$ 


4,634.69 




3,048.75 




17.67 


$ 


3,066.42 


$ 


1,568.27 



165 



DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 

Administerd by the Board of Selectmen. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 $ 6,727.79 

Receipts: Interest Income 

Securities Matured 718.81 

2,000.00 



Payments: Expenses 

Securities Purchased 
Accrued Interest 
Transaction Fee 



$ 


9,446.60 




5,000.00 




2,012.50 




8.91 




10.00 



$ 7,031.41 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1 996 $ 2,415.19 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 



MMDT Composite Trust Fund 2,415.19 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.00% 1 0/1 5/96 1 ,955.64 

$1 ,000 U.S. Treasury 6.875% 3/31/97 1 ,000.00 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 6.125% 5/15/98 1,016.25 

$1 ,000 U.S. Treasury 5.25% 1/31/01 996.25 

$ 7,383.33 

Accumulated Income 2,127.26 

Principal 5,256.07 

$ 7,383.33 



166 



$ 


1 ,348.66 
70.27 


$ 


1,418.93 
0.00 


$ 


1,418.93 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 

Payments: 

None 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 
MMDT Composite Trust Fund $ 1 ,41 8.93 

Accumulated Income $ 1,418.93 

JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 $ 109.17 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 194.11 

$ 303.28 
Payments: 

None 0.00 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 $ 303.28 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 
$3,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 





303.28 
3,000.00 


$ 


3,303.28 

2,068.28 
1,235.00 


$ 


3,303.28 



167 



JOSEPH BROOKS GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 

Administered by Board of Selectmen. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 $ 235.71 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 
Securities Matured 

Payments: 

Securities Purchased 
Accrued Interest 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1 996 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 
$1000 U. S. Treasury 6.125% 5/15/98 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 





96.68 




1,000.00 


$ 


1,332.39 




1,016.25 




5.89 


$ 


1,022.14 


$ 


310.25 





310.25 
997.81 


$ 


1,308.06 

90.79 
1,217.27 


$ 


1,308.06 



168 



LAWRENCE H. GREEN FUND 

Administered by the President of the Lincoln PTA, the Chairman of the Lincoln 
Elementary School Committee and the Superintendent of the Lincoln Elementary 
Schools. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 
Securities Matured 

Payments: 

Securities Purchased 
Accrued Interest 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 1 ,651 .55 

$1 ,000 U.S. Treasury 6.125% 5/15/98 997.81 

$ 2,649.36 

Accumulated Income 1 ,341 .71 

Principal 1,307.65 

$ 2,649.36 



$ 


1,511.66 




162.03 




1,000.00 


$ 


2,673.69 




1,016.25 




5.89 


$ 


1,022.14 


$ 


1,651.55 



169 



CHRISTINE PATTERSON FUND 

Administered by the Principal of the Brooks or Hartwell School, a staff member of the 
Brooks or Hartwell School, and a parent selected by the Board of Directors of the 
Lincoln PTA. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 
Securities Matured 

Payments: 

Books 

Securities Purchased 
Accrued Interest 
Transaction fee 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 2, 1 55.67 

$10,000 U.S. Treasury 6.125% 5/15/98 10,000.00 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 5.25% 1/31/01 974.40 

$ 13,130.07 

Accumulated Income 1 ,705.02 

Principal 11,425.05 

$ 13,130.07 



$ 2,807.75 


1,095.57 
11,000.00 


$ 14,903.32 


1,520.00 

11,158.75 

58.90 

10.00 


$ 12,747.65 


$ 2,155.67 



170 



DE CORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 
Securities Matured 



Payments: 



$ 


2,538.53 




1,884.41 
5,000.00 


$ 


9,422.94 




7,073.75 
35.51 
10.00 


$ 


7,119.26 


$ 


2,303.68 



Purchase Securities 
Accrued Interest 
Transaction Fee 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 2,303.68 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 6.125% 12/31/96 2,000.00 

$4,000 U.S. Treasury 6.875% 3/31/97 4,000.00 

$1 ,000 U.S. Treasury 8.50% 5/1 5/97 988.44 

$5,000 U.S. Treasury 6.125% 5/15/98 5,081.25 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 1 0/1 5/99 3,000.00 

$1 ,000 U.S. Treasury 5.50% 4/1 5/00 933.75 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 5.25% 1/31/01 1,992.50 

$4,000 U.S. Treasury 7.50% 5/1 5/02 3,926.24 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.75% 1 1/15/08 2,925.00 

$27,150.86 

Principal & Accumulated Income $27,150.86 



171 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Administered by three Trustees, one each appointed by the Selectmen, the Lincoln 
School Committee and the Town Moderator. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1 995 $ 41 ,278.76 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 11,728.75 

General Appeal 5,955.00 

Donations 5,000.00 

Securities Matured 28,000.00 



Payments: 



$ 91,962.51 



Awards and Expenses 10,242.94 

Purchase Securities 28,319.37 

Accrued Interest 256.16 

Transaction Fee 50.00 



$ 38,868.47 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 $ 53,094.04 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 53,094.04 

$1 ,000 U.S. Treasury 6.875% 3/31/97 1 ,000.00 

$10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.50% 5/15/97 9,943.75 

$14,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 8/31/97 14,088.1 1 

$11,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 12/31/97 11,000.00 

$6,000 U.S. Treasury 7.875% 1/15/98 5,934.38 

$15,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 15,000.00 

$6,000 U.S. Treasury 5.50% 4/1 5/00 5,602.50 

$14,000 U.S. Treasury 5.625% 11/30/00 14,101.24 

$15,000 U.S. Treasury 7.50% 11/15/01 15,000.00 

$17,000 U.S. Treasury 7.50% 5/15/02 16,686.64 

320 Shares Exxon Corporation 3,016.85 

100 Shares NIPSCO Industries, Inc. 2,973.63 

$167,441.14 
Principal 

Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 1,000.00 

Lincoln 4-H Horse Club Fund 1 ,770.00 

Ernest P. Neumann Memorial Fund 6,005.00 

Eleanor Tead Fund 1,1 20.00 

Ogden Codman Endowment Fund 9,645.00 

19,540.00 

Accumulated Income 147,901.14 

$167,441.14 



172 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen and managed by the Pierce Property 
Committee. 

Cash Balance at June 30 

Receipts: 



Payments: 



jne30, 1995 


$ 43,803.50 


Interest Income 


12,585.76 


Use of Pierce House - Fees and Deposits (net) 


95,520.00 


Elsie Pierce Trust 


7,646.99 


Securities Matured 


40,000.00 




$199,556.25 


Manager Compensation 


14,123.50 


Electricity 


1,762.53 


Heating Fuel 


5,788.48 


Water 


774.84 


Repairs and Maintenance 


20,257.79 


Rubbish 


1,895.40 


Mowing 


5,012.83 


Telephone 


1,459.12 


Supplies and Furnishings 


3,318.16 


Administrative Expenses 


1,874.17 


Capital Expense 


39,186.14 


Miscellaneous 


1,731.00 


Purchase of Securities 


30,181.25 


Accrued Interest 


396.23 




$127,761.44 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 
Unrestricted as to Principal and Income 
MMDT Composite Trust Fund 



$ 71,794.81 



$ 68,065.77 



173 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 

Restricted as to Principal and Income 

MMDT - Cash 3,729.04 

$10,000 Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 4.625% 6/1/97 10,000.00 

$20,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 8/31/97 20,218.75 

$20,000 U.S. Treasury 8.75% 10/15/97 20,000.00 

$10,000 AT&T Co. 4.75% 6/1/98 10,000.00 

$1 ,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 1 ,000.00 

$20,000 U.S. Treasury 7.875% 1 1/15/99 20,031 .26 

$10,000 U.S. Treasury 5.25% 1/31/01 9,962.50 

$10,000 U.S. Treasury 7.50% 11/15/01 10,000.00 

$6,000 U.S. Treasury 7.50% 5/1 5/02 5,889.36 

110,830.91 
178,896.68 



$178,896.68 



Accumulated Income 62,582.14 

Principal 116,314.54 

$178,896.68 



174 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Administered by the Library Trustees. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1 995 $ 20,1 58.95 

Receipts: Interest Income by Fund 

Codman Library Trust Fund 53.97 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth & Murray P. Famsworth Fund 54.71 

Alice Downing Hart & Olive Beatrice Floyd Fund 67.73 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 81 .85 

George Russell Library Fund 54.03 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 92.60 

George G. Tarbell Fund 718.94 

C. Edgar Wheeler & Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 66.75 

George C. Tarbell & Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 457.81 

Lincoln Library Fund 81 .62 
Katherine S. Bolt Fund 

John W. Carman & Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 2,540.04 

Lucretia J. Hoover Fund 157.09 

Herschbach Library Fund 345.21 

Virginia S. Dillman Fund 554.58 

West Abrashkin Fund 43.30 

Dorothy Moore 193.93 

Securities Matured 9,000.00 

Gift - Dorothy Moore 5,000.00 



Payments: 

To Librarian from J. H. Pierce Library Fund 

Purchase of Books, Tapes, Videos, and Newspapers 

Purchase Securities 

Accrued Interest 

"$15,929.06 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1 996 $ 23,794.05 



$39,723.11 


55.42 


1,689.73 


14,101.45 


82.46 



175 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Securities Principal 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 1,000.00 

George G. Tarbell Library Fund 

$1 ,000 U.S. Treasury 6.125% 5/15/98 996.95 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 7.125% 10/15/98 1,000.00 

$1 ,000 U.S. Treasury 7.50% 5/1 5/02 981 .56 

George G. & Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 

$10,000 U.S. Treasury 7.875% 11/15/99 10,015.62 

C. Edgar & Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 1,000.00 

John W. & Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 6.125% 5/15/98 3,029.40 

$9,000 U.S. Treasury 6.875% 3/31/97 9,000.00 

$12,000 U.S. Treasury 5.50% 4/15/00 1 1 ,205.00 

$6,000 U.S. Treasury 7.50% 5/15/02 5,889.36 

Herschbach Fund 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 7.50% 5/15/02 1,963.12 

Lucretia J. Hoover Fund 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 2,000.00 

Virginia S. Dillman Fund 

$5,000 U.S. Treasury 6.125% 5/15/98 4,998.96 

J. Pierce Library 

$1 ,000 U.S. Treasury 7.50% 5/1 5/02 981 .56 

Lincoln Library 

$1 ,000 U.S. Treasury 7.50% 5/1 5/02 981 .56 

Dorothy Moore Fund 

$5,000 U.S. Treasury 6.125% 5/15/98 4,998.95 

$ 60,042.04 



$83,836.09 



Accumulated Income 11,841.71 

Principal 71,994.38 

$83,836.09 



176 



NORMAN HAPGOOD FUND 






Administered by Roy Raja. 






Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 


$ 


110.91 


Receipts: 






Interest Income 




5.86 


Contributions 




7.00 




$ 


123.77 


Payments: 






None 




0.00 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1 996 $ 1 23.77 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund $ 123.77 

Accumulated Income & Principal $ 123.77 

ALFRED CALLAHAN FUND 

Administered by the principal of Brooks School and the Brooks School Eighth 
Grade Teaching Team. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1995 $ 625.96 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 248.22 



$ 874.18 

Payments: 

None 0.00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1996 $ 874.18 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1996 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 
$3,000 U.S. Treasury 6.375% 8/15/02 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 





874.18 
2,830.32 


$ 


3,704.50 

688.57 
3,015.93 


$ 


3,704.50 



177 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 

ABBOTT, MARGARET G. 

ABEDIAN, BEHROUZ 

ABELE, ROSEMARY M. 

ABRAMS, GEORGES.TR. 

ABRAMS, GEORGE S..TR. 

ABRAMS, GEORGE S., TR. 

ABRAMS, NANCY 

ABRASHKIN, DIANA C. A. 

ACKLEY, WALLACE E. 

ADAMS FAMILY REALTY TRUST 

ADAMS JOHN 

ADAMS, F. DOUGLAS 

ADAMS, GEORGE H. 

ADAMS, PETER B., TR. 

ADAMS, THOMAS & RAMELLE, TRS 

ADAMS, THOMAS & RAMELLE, TRS. 

ADAMS, THOMAS B. 

ADELSTEIN.MARYT. 

ADELSTEIN.MARYT. 

ADKINS, ROBERT H. 

ADLER, HAROLD 

ADLER, RUTH IVY 

AGRAWAL, SUBHASH C. 

AIRPORT REALTY TRUST 

ALAM, UMME SALMA MOMTAZ, TRUST 

ALAM, UMME SALMA MOMTAZ, TRUST 

ALEXANDER RAND L 

ALFIERIS, MICHAEL 

ALLEN, ROSAMOND W. 

ALLEN, RUTH TR. 

ALLEN, STEPHEN A. Ill 

ALLISON, GEOFFREY P. 

ALLISON, JOHN R. 

ALLOTT, KATHRYN J. 

ALTHAUSEN, ALEX F. 

ALTMAN, RENEE 

AMES, JAMES B & SUZANNAH 

AMMEN, DAVID L. 

ANDERSON MICHAEL J 

ANDERSON, BRUCE R. 

ANDERSON, JOHN L. 

ANDERSON, LAWRENCE B. 

ANDLEY, KAUSHAL K. 

ANDONIAN SAMUEL J 

ANDREWS, FRANCIS S. 

ANGELL, CAROLYN STOCKHOFF, TR 



LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


111 CHESTNUT 


CR 


240,500 


16 ACORN 


LN 


336,500 


11 MINEBROOK 


RD 


613,700 


TWIN POND 


LN 


303,400 


TWIN POND 


LN 


285,100 


4 TWIN POND 


LN 


1,166,300 


116 LINCOLN 


RD 


311,900 


181 


RD 


206,800 


ROUND HILL 


RD 


1,100 


BAKER FARM 




38,000 


28 TABOR HILL 


RD 


612,200 


19 GRANVILLE 


RD 


532,200 


191 TOWER 


RD 


587,500 


39 BAKER FARM 




457,589 


BAKER FARM 




39,300 


37 BAKER FARM 




653,330 


BAKER FARM 




906 


BEAVER POND 


RD 


32,800 


BEAVER POND 


RD 


308,000 


61 TOWER 


RD 


852,900 


44 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


580,100 


HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


21,200 


23 WARBLER SPRINGS 


RD 


997,400 


12 AIRPORT 


RD 


249,200 


11 BROOKS 


HL 


556,400 


20 OLD CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


227,400 


54 BEDFORD 


RD 


1,311,600 


215 ASPEN 


CR 


213,700 


147 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


304,400 


61 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


701,400 


54 TODD POND 


RD 


152,700 


75 CONANT 


RD 


569,500 


244 ASPEN 


CR 


224,300 


148 LINCOLN 


RD 


328,900 


6 WOODCOCK 


LN 


624,500 


26D INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


163,200 


12 BROWNING 


LN 


584,100 


64 BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


588,400 


122 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


588,000 


194 LINCOLN 


RD 


684,800 


49 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


362,300 


44 BEAVER POND 


RD 


604,300 


17 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


236,000 


34 GARLAND 


RD 


1,033,100 


22 TABOR HILL 


RD 


545,100 


7 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


430,100 



178 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 

ANNESE, FILOMENA 

APPELL, JANE (ARONSON) 

APPIGNANI BARBARA ANNE 

APPLEYARD, NORMAN M., JR. TR. 

APRILLE, THOMAS J. 

APSLER, ROBERT 

ARCAND, EUGENE J, JR. 

ARISTA, MIGUEL S. 

ARMSTRONG, JOHN L. 

ARNOLD, JEROME G. 

ARNOLD, JOHN H. 

ARNOLD, WARREN H. 

ARSENEAULT PATRICIA G 

ARSHAD, GULREZ 

ART, ROBERT J 

ARTHUR DOGAN W 

ARTHUR LORETTA 

ARTHUR, JACQUELINE 

ASADORIAN.ALANA. 

ASAPH HAROLD J 

ASFOUR.YOUSIFR. 

ASHE SARAH S 

ASSOC. RELOCATION MANAGMT 

ATCHLEY, BARBARA P. 

ATKINS. JOHN J. 

ATKINS, THOMAS L. 

ATLAS, STEPHEN D. 

AUSTIN, HELENA. 

AVERY, ALBERT M. Ill 

AYER, MARILYN C. 

AZRACK, JOSEPH F. 

B H N REALTY TRUST 

BABROUDI IDA 

BACHRACH, ALAN, JR. 

BAIRD, GORDON P. 

BALDWIN, JACQUELINE L 

BALDWIN, ROGER P. 

BALOGH, KAROLY 

BANERJI, JULIAN 

BANKS JAMIE L 

BANNON, MICHAEL F. 

BARBIASZ, MARY ELLEN 

BARDSLEY, THEODORE J. 

BARE HELENS 

BARGMANN, JOEL D. 

BARKAS, CHRISTOPHER W. 

BARMAKIAN NORMA 



LOCATION 

11 CAMBRIDGE 

14 OAK MEADOW 
48 CONANT 

333 HEMLOCK 
276 CAMBRIDGE 
84 MILL 

27 WHEELER 

15 MORNINGSIDE 
141 WESTON 

14 BIRCHWOOD 
48 TOWER 

3 BLUEBERRY 

2A NORTH COMMONS 
160 OLD COUNTY 
155 SOUTH GREAT 

16 TABOR HILL 
10 TABOR HILL 

4 BROOKS 

36 MORNINGSIDE 

5 DEERHAVEN 

15D SOUTH COMMONS 
51 GREENRIDGE 
24 BEAVER POND 
51 TODD POND 
7 BROOKS 

3 CERULEAN 
31 OLD WINTER 

140 LINCOLN 

45 TODD POND 
213 ASPEN 

19 BEDFORD 

CONCORD 

154 LEXINGTON 

6 BROOKS 
331 HEMLOCK 
212 ASPEN 

28 LINCOLN 

10 WOODS END 

37 LINCOLN 
154 LINCOLN 
46C INDIAN CAMP 

8D NORTH COMMONS 
132 WESTON 
87 TODD POND 

4 CEDAR 

46 BYPASS 

11 FARRAR 



TOTAL VALUE 

TP 262,100 

611,000 

RD 433,400 

CR 316,900 

TP 167,600 

ST 648,600 

RD 828,700 

LN 282,600 

RD 788,600 

LN 305,400 

RD 521,700 

LN 394,800 

120,000 

RD 781,000 

RD 286,600 

RD 477,600 

RD 277,400 

HL 611,300 

LN 317,600 

RD 381,500 

225,300 

LN 210,300 

RD 407,900 

RD 123,700 

RD 350,500 

WY 885,100 

ST 445,800 

RD 234,300 

RD 130,200 

CR 213,500 

RD 1,056,800 

RD 1,800 

RD 482,400 

RD 497,400 

CR 294,500 

CR 207,800 

RD 469,300 

RD 535,100 

RD 437,700 

RD 336,600 

LN 86,000 

130,000 

RD 347,500 

RD 519,100 

RD 440,600 

RD 327,600 

RD 547,700 



179 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1, 1996 



OWNER NAME 

BARNES, BENJAMIN A. 
BARNES, MICHAEL R. 
BARNET, JAMES R. 
BARRETT, BEATRICE H. 
BARRY, JON T. 
BARTOVICS, WILLIAM A. 
BASILE, PATRICK R. 
BASSETT, KENNETH E. 
BEAL, THOMAS P., JR. 
BEARD, ANDREW D. 
BEATTY, THOMAS L. JR. 
BEECHER.MYRNAJ. 
BEENHOUWER, OWEN 
BELANGER, MICHAEL P 
BELITSKY, LEE J. 
BELL, ROGER A. 
BELLE, GENE 
BELLE, GENE 
BEMIS, ANNC. 
BENCAL, CYNTHIA E. 
BENDETSON, ANDREW P, TR. 
BENEDETTI, MARY ANN 
BENNETT, DORIS E. 
BENSON, ANN D. 
BENTLEY, BARBARA HYDE 
BENTLEY, JOYCE S. 
BENTLEY, ROBERT P. 
BENTON, STEPHEN A. 
BERARDINO, RICHARD A. 
BERGEN, KENNETH W. 
BERGEN, KENNETH W. 
BERGEN, ROGER V.D. 
BERGER, RALPH 
BERLOWITZ, DAN R. 
BERMAN, DIANE B. 
BERMUDEZ, CARLOS F. 
BERNARD, CLARK L 
BERNSTEIN, MELVIN H. 
BERRY GEORGE W 
BERRY GEORGE W 
BERRY, GEORGE W 
BIBRING, GEORGE L 
BIDDLE CHRISTOPHER W 
BIENFANG, DON C. 
BIGNALL, DAVID G. 
BIKALES, NORMAN 
BILLINGS FANNIE H 



LOCATION 

48 BEAVER POND RD 

26 OLD SUDBURY RD 

63 TODD POND RD 

55 WINTER ST 

3 DEER RUN RD 
28 OLD WINTER ST 
42 BYPASS RD 
37 PAGE RD 
26 BAKER BRIDGE RD 

32 FARRAR RD 

36 TOWER RD 
20 BIRCHWOOD LN 

8 OLD WINTER ST 

157 BEDFORD RD 

20R INDIAN CAMP LN 

15 PINE RIDGE RD 

10 BROOKS RD 

14 BROOKS RD 

141 CHESTNUT CR 

5C SOUTH COMMONS 

31 MORNINGSIDE LN 

32B INDIAN CAMP LN 

227 LINCOLN RD 

4 JUNIPER RIDGE RD 
40 TODD POND RD 

37 LAUREL DR 
140 LINCOLN RD 
319 SOUTH GREAT RD 
28R INDIAN CAMP LN 

MACKINTOSH LN 

22 MACKINTOSH LN 

20 MACKINTOSH LN 
2 UNDERWOOD CR 

121 OLD COUNTY RD 

7 UPLAND FIELD RD 

186 WESTON RD 

21 TWIN POND LN 

33 GREENRIDGE LN 
131 WESTON RD 
133 WESTON RD 

WESTON RD 

168 BEDFORD RD 

2 WINCHELSEA LN 

2 TABOR HILL RD 

35 ROUND HILL RD 

226 OLD COUNTY ROAD EX 

JUNIPER RIDGE RD 



TOTAL VALUE 

542,200 
273,400 
604,300 
601 ,200 
554,000 
367,800 
350,200 
505,000 
604,100 
372,600 
589,500 
312,000 
498,800 
263,800 
235,700 
332,500 
199,400 
345,400 
276,000 
178,400 
274,900 
149,700 
281,000 
240,800 

75,000 
479,700 
277,500 
351 ,300 
130,000 

50,900 

1 ,041 ,200 

771,300 

409,900 

555,300 

438,100 

291 ,700 

677,500 

215,600 

1 ,099,300 

1 ,044,500 

40,500 
266,300 
183,000 
544,700 
619,100 
846,700 

77.600 



180 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


BILLINGS, DESPENA F. 


110 LINCOLN 


RD 


502,200 


BILLINGS, SARAH W, TR. 


JUNIPER RIDGE 


RD 


69,500 


BILLMAN GENIEVA M TRUSTEE 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


247,800 


BIRMINGHAM, JAMES G. 


7 TODD POND 


RD 


518,800 


BISHOP, ROBERTO 


6 BLUEBERRY 


LN 


564,400 


BJORK, ELIZABETH D. 


104 TOWER 


RD 


477,900 


BLACK, STANLY E. 


STOREY 


DR 


172,400 


BLACK, THOMAS E. 


26 STOREY 


DR 


552,300 


BLACKLER, PETER 


86 CONANT 


RD 


332,300 


BLATT, THOMAS A. 


132 BEDFORD 


RD 


322,000 


BLOOD, BERNARD E. 


104 LINCOLN 


RD 


415,500 


BLOOM, LAURENCE S. 


172 TRAPELO 


RD 


329,300 


BOBBITT, LAKE H. 


26 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


283,500 


BOCKOVEN, DOROTHY R., TRUSTEE 


179 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


359,200 


BODMAN, TAYLOR S. 


75 TODD POND 


RD 


633,700 


BOGNER, WALTER P. 


9 WOODS END 


RD 


490,000 


BOLT, RICHARD H., TR. 


39 TABOR HILL 


RD 


587,800 


BOLTON, WARREN R. 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


36,100 


BOND, ROGER B. 


138 WESTON 


RD 


346,900 


BOOTH RICHARD H 


17 BOYCE FARM 


RD 


488,400 


BOOTH, ALICE BURRAGE 


OLD CONCORD 


RD 


3,100 


BOOTH, ALICE BURRAGE, EST OF 


OLD CONCORD 


RD 


30,700 


BOOTH, ROBERT H. 


OLD CONCORD 


RD 


1,100 


BOOTH, ROBERT H. 


145 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


811,800 


BOOTH, ROBERT H., TR 


OLD CONCORD 


RD 


30,100 


BOQUIST, WALLACE P. 


241 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


646,700 


BOQUIST, WALLACE P. 


247 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


590,200 


BORES STEPHEN M 


323 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


301 ,300 


BORNSTEIN TIM 


58 BEAVER POND 


RD 


512,000 


BORUVKA, JOHN V. 


46B INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


100,000 


BOSTON EDISON COMPANY 


TOWER 


RD 


341,000 


BOURGAN.ABBIE 


17 CERULEAN 


WY 


737,200 


BOWER, JOSEPH L 


54 BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


535,900 


BOWERS, SPOTSWOOD D. Ill 


21 SUNNYSIDE 


LN 


287,500 


BOWLES, LOUISE H. 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


232,400 


BOWLES, M. LOUISE 


114 LEXINGTON 


RD 


292,600 


BOYCE, MANLEY B. 


31 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


444,300 


BOYCE, MANLEY B. II 


28 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


238,800 


BOYCE, MARY ALICE 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


228,400 


BOYER, JOHNH. 


22 TODD POND 


RD 


474,700 


BOYLE, DONALD J. 


46 GREENRIDGE 


LN 


226,400 


BOYNTON, DANIEL C. 


34 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


185,200 


BRAASCH, JOHNW. 


56 SANDY POND 


RD 


599,500 


BRADEN, JOHNL 


267 CONCORD 


RD 


537,600 


BRADFORD, MARK A, 


5 CEDAR 


RD 


319,800 


BRADLEE SANDRA 


OLD CONCORD 


RD 


1,300 


BRADLEE SANDRA 


259 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


1,163,800 



181 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


BRADLEY, CLIFFORD 


80 TOWER 


RD 


294,200 


BRAIN, J. WALTER 


255 CONCORD 


RD 


210,900 


BRAINARD, PATRICIA W. 


8 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


203,700 


BRAND, STEPHEN JAMES 


161 BEDFORD 


RD 


313,300 


BRANDT, JOHN H. 


131 OLD COUNTY 


RD 


467,200 


BRANDT, SUZANNE M. 


11B SOUTH COMMONS 




174,600 


BRANNEN, BARBARA A. 


14 BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


691 ,200 


BRAUDE. STEPHEN E., TRUSTEE 


52 BEAVER POND 


RD 


718,200 


BRAUN, ESTHER K. 


19 MOCCASIN 


HL 


525,900 


BRAY, THOMAS P. 


BROOKS 


RD 


22,000 


BRAY, THOMAS P. 


11 BROOKS 


RD 


207,200 


BRAY, THOMAS P. 


15 BYPASS 


RD 


270,000 


BRAY, THOMAS P. 


3 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


370,500 


BRENNAN, MICHAEL W. 


138 TOWER 


RD 


460,800 


BRENNAN, WILLIAM L 


34 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


308,100 


BRENNINKMEYER, GABRIELLE 


146 SANDY POND 


RD 


1,463,300 


BRENNINKMEYER, MAXIMILIAAN J. 


66 TODD POND 


RD 


616,700 


BRESLIN, FRANK J. 


4 WINCHELSEA 


LN 


721,100 


BRIGGS, DAVID L 


16 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


623,700 


BRIGGS, RANDAL 


44 FARRAR 


RD 


354,100 


BRINEY, LESTER S. 


39 BYPASS 


RD 


105,700 


BRISSON, EVELYN W. 


176 TRAPELO 


RD 


478,400 


BROBECK, WILLIAM M. 


RED RAIL FARM 




22,500 


BROBECK, WILLIAM M. 


26 RED RAIL FARM 




303,600 


BROCKELMAN, WEBSTER R., JR 


15 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


355,700 


BRODERICK, RONALD F. 


OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


6,000 


BRODNEY, MYRA 


12 OAK MEADOW 




553,900 


BRONSON, FRANKLIN C. 


180 WESTON 


RD 


323,200 


BROOKS, PAUL 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


42,300 


BROOKS, PAUL 


5 SILVER HILL 


RD 


648,500 


BROOKS, RODNEY A. 


30 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


327,700 


BROWER HOWARD S 


12 WOODS END 


RD 


789,600 


BROWN, ALBERT H. 


15 GARLAND 


RD 


1 ,258,000 


BROWN, HERBERT L 


44 PAGE 


RD 


444,000 


BROWN, JEFFREY R. 


217 SANDY POND 


RD 


754,300 


BROWN, ROBERT W. 


18 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


241,900 


BROWN, STEPHEN M. 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


2,800 


BROWN, STEPHEN M. 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


28,500 


BROWN, STEPHEN M. 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


24,800 


BROWN, STEPHEN M. 


220 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


646,700 


BROWNE, GILES C. 


11 TRAPELO 


RD 


548,500 


BRUMME, PETER E. 


4 OAK MEADOW 




576,200 


BUCHAN, BARBARA C. 


162 BEDFORD 


RD 


278,500 


BUCHOLTZ, MELVYN S. 


149 OLD COUNTY 


RD 


544,400 


BUCKLER, MARILYN L, TR. 


12 HIDDENWOOD 


PT 


373,700 


BUELL, LAWRENCE I. 


124 TOWER 


RD 


442,900 


BULLITT, JOHN T. 


HILLIARD 


RD 


26,900 



182 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


BULLITT, JOHN T. 


21 HILLIARD 


RD 


518,600 


BUNSAI GAKUEN INSTITUTE 


19 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


166,800 


BUONOPANE, PAUL J. 


262 LINCOLN 


RD 


297,700 


BURCKETT, DOUGLAS M. 


58 PAGE 


RD 


420,300 


BURK, PRESCOTT R. 


89 CONANT 


RD 


493,800 


BURKE, ROGER M. 


9 TABOR HILL 


RD 


524,800 


BURKE, THOMAS F. 


3 SMITH 


HL 


629,700 


BURKE, WALTER J., JR. TRUSTEE 


78 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


318,800 


BURLING, LAURA 


11D SOUTH COMMONS 




228,200 


BURNES, JEANNETTE 


115 CHESTNUT 


CR 


273,400 


BURNHAM, ROBERT BOIT 


8 OAK KNOLL 


RD 


280,300 


BURNS, CHRISTOPHER E. 


222 TOWER 


RD 


1 ,230,600 


BURNS, ROBERT W. 


16D NORTH COMMONS 




234,700 


BURT, DONNA G. 


26 LONG MEADOW 


RD 


483,200 


BURTON MICHAEL F 


45 GREENRIDGE 


LN 


225,700 


BUZNEY, SHELDON 


28 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


793,000 


BYE, WILLIS E. 


52 ROUND HILL 


RD 


661 ,300 


BYRNE, BRIAN A. 


134 LEXINGTON 


RD 


234,700 


BYRNE, BRIAN A. 


TRAPELO 


RD 


304,900 


BYRNE, BRIAN A. 


TRAPELO 


RD 


23,500 


BYRNE, BRIAN A. 


126 TRAPELO 


RD 


711,600 


BYRNES, MARGARET A. 


82 MILL 


ST 


635,900 


CABOT, MARY D.G. 


216 ASPEN 


CR 


224,900 


CADETE, ANTONIA M. 


36D INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


166,100 


CALDWELL, SARAH 


71 WESTON 


RD 


701,400 


CALDWELL, SHAWN D. 


3A SOUTH COMMONS 




176,800 


CALHOUN ANNEMARIE 


23A SOUTH COMMONS 




120,000 


CALITRI, LEON K. 


63 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


251 ,700 


CAMPBELL, BRUCE D. 


46 BEDFORD 


RD 


411,300 


CAMPBELL, BRUCE D. 


20 BROWNING 


LN 


497,100 


CAMPOBASSO, RICHARD B. 


130 TOWER 


RD 


411,400 


CAMPOS-GARCIA, GERMAN & JUDITH 


WESTON 


RD 


1,700 


CANCIAN.DAVIDJ. 


18 JUNIPER RIDGE 


RD 


424,200 


CANDEE, MORTON 


138 TRAPELO 


RD 


400,000 


CANNON, BRADFORD 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


28,200 


CANNON, BRADFORD 


12 SILVER HILL 


RD 


332,500 


CANNON, ELLEN DEN. 


WESTON 


RD 


19,800 


CANNON, ROBERT L. 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


196,300 


CANNON, ROBERT LAURENT 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


26,500 


CANNON, ROBERT LAURENT 


30 SILVER HILL 


RD 


501,300 


CANNON, ROBERT LAURENT, TR. 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


32,100 


CANNON, ROBERT LAURENT, TR. 


8 SILVER HILL 


RD 


339,000 


CANNON, WALTER B., TRUSTEE 


WESTON 


RD 


19,900 


CANTLIN, ANTOINETTE 


3 LEWIS 


ST 


250,600 


CANTLIN, ANTOINETTE 


7 LEWIS 


ST 


284,800 


CANTLIN, JOHN H. 


7 DEER RUN 


RD 


603,500 


CANTU, ROBERT C, TRUSTEE 


SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


24,200 



183 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1 996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


CANTU, ROBERT C, TRUSTEE 


19 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


1 ,076,900 


CAPIZZ1, CATHERINE R. 


LONG MEADOW 


RD 


1,000 


CAPIZZI, CATHERINE R. 


236 LINCOLN 


RD 


969,200 


CAPIZZI, CATHERINE R. 


LONG MEADOW 


RD 


15,900 


CAPIZZI, CATHERINE R. 


LONG MEADOW 


RD 


14,500 


CAPIZZI, CATHERINE R. 


LONG MEADOW 


RD 


21,200 


CAPONE, ALBERT 


26 OLD CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


429,100 


CAPPUCCI, BARBARA A. 


8 HUNTLEY 


LN 


348,700 


CARANO, DONALD C. 


4 CERULEAN 


WY 


2,166,400 


CARAS, BYRON 


9 HIDDENWOOD 


PT 


369,000 


CARAS, OPHAIR 


19 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


263,700 


CARBONE, DAWN M. 


2C NORTH COMMONS 




120,000 


CAREY WILLIAM C 


207 CONCORD 


RD 


559,300 


CARL, CHARLES WJR 


146 TRAPELO 


RD 


521,400 


CARL, CHARLES WJR 


148 TRAPELO 


RD 


108,800 


CARLEY, JOHN A. 


30 TOWER 


RD 


521 ,800 


CARLO, PETER A. 


9 OAK KNOLL 


RD 


307,800 


CARMAN, ELEANOR T. 


235 ASPEN 


CR 


214,000 


CARME, SHEILA ANN 


34B INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


149,700 


CARMEN DEVELOPMENT CORPORATI 


19 RIDGE 


RD 


2,752,400 


CARMEN, LOUISE 


44 WINDINGWOOD 


LN 


481,700 


CARO, JAIME 


198 LINCOLN 


RD 


700,100 


CARR, FREDERICKS. 


208 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


633,100 


CARR, FREDERICKS. JR. 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


22,700 


CARROLL, ELAINE M. 


34 LEWIS 


ST 


288,300 


CARTER, LEWIS A. 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


24,600 


CARTER, LEWIS A. 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


24,800 


CARTER, LEWIS A. 


212 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


629,700 


CASKEY, ANNA H. 


49 WINTER 


ST 


319,800 


CASKEY, WALTER H. 


29 PAGE 


RD 


519,000 


CASSANO MICHAEL G 


6 BROOKS 


HL 


540,000 


CASSIDY, BRIAN P., TRUSTEE 


CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


38,700 


CASSIDY, BRIAN P., TRUSTEE 


81 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


159,500 


CASWELL FREDERICK M 


4 TOWER 


RD 


581 ,500 


CASWELL, JOHN ROSS 


2 BEAVER POND 


RD 


551 ,200 


CAVALLARO, PETER, TR. 


8 SMITH 


HL 


673,700 


CELLUCCI, ELIZABETH H. 


26 LAUREL 


DR 


392,600 


CHAIKEN, JAN M. 


66 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


357,700 


CHALILPOYIL, PURUSH 


24 SUNNYSIDE 


LN 


291,100 


CHAMBERLIN, CAROLYN 


25 GREENRIDGE 


LN 


217,100 


CHAMPENY, JOHN 


205 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


403,400 


CHAMPENY, JOHN C. 


CONANT 


RD 


3,000 


CHAMPENY, JOHN C. 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


247,700 


CHAMPENY, LEONA G. 


SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


303,400 


CHAMPION, CRAIG 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


21,600 


CHAMPION, CRAIG 


210 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


656,600 


CHAN, CATHERINE T. 


3 PARTRIDGE 


LN 


352,700 



184 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


CHAN, VINCENT W.S. 


163 TOWER 


RD 


496,500 


CHAO, CHUNG- YAO 


11 SUNNYSIDE 


LN 


310,100 


CHAPIN, EST. BERTHA 


8 BEDFORD 


RD 


402,900 


CHAPIN, EST. BERTHA 


5 SANDY POND 


RD 


517,450 


CHARLES I REAL ESTATE TRUST 


LEXINGTON 


RD 


2,628 


CHARLES I REAL ESTATE TRUST 


LEXINGTON 


RD 


4,733 


CHARRETTE, EDMOND E. 


81 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


415,000 


CHASE, IRVING H., TRUSTEE 


5 OAK MEADOW 




610,300 


CHEN, SOW-HSIN 


CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


127,000 


CHEN-BUCKLAND EUNICE 


76 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


342,800 


CHERNIACK, ELIZABETH E. 


281 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


243,100 


CHIN, BARBARA J. 


364 HEMLOCK 


CR 


210,900 


CHIOTEUS, CHARLES L. 


141 TRAPELO 


RD 


459,900 


CHISHOLM, EDWARD J., TR. 


142 TOWER 


RD 


369,900 


CHOLAWSKY, EUABETH M. 


11 OAK KNOLL 


RD 


242,800 


CHOPRA, DEEPAK 


43 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


653,000 


CHRISTENSEN, RONALD 


345 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


461,700 


CHU, CHAUNCYC. 


43 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


431,200 


CHU, GE YAO 


200 SANDY POND 


RD 


564,300 


CHU, IRENE H. 


1 PINE RIDGE 


RD 


413,600 


CHU, NELSON F. 


62 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


360,700 


CHUCKER, SUSAN 


24R INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


175,200 


CHURCH, ROBERT T. 


47 BEAVER POND 


RD 


603,500 


CIAMPA, VINCENTP.TR. 


32 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


171,200 


CIAMPI, MARY P. 


4 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


281 ,200 


CIARAMAGLIA, FREDERICK J. 


94 PAGE 


RD 


457,500 


CIRASO, ANNE & JENNIE 


19 MACKINTOSH 


LN 


438,300 


CISNEROS. MARIA H. 


326 HEMLOCK 


CR 


181,700 


CIVITTOLO LEONARD 


23D SOUTH COMMONS 




228,600 


CLAFLIN, NANCY A. 


345 HEMLOCK 


CR 


349,600 


CLARKE, BRUCE E. 


17 STOREY 


DR 


713,900 


CLEAVER, LAIRD C, TR 


67 SANDY POND 


RD 


1 ,298,900 


COAN, THOMAS 


237 LINCOLN 


RD 


290,300 


COFFIN, STEWART T. 


79 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


335,724 


COHEN, JACQUES 


40 WINDINGWOOD 


LN 


374,600 


COHEN, KENNETH A. 


20 TODD POND 


RD 


1 ,038,000 


COLE, ADDISON, D. 


43 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


304,600 


COLE, ANDREW J. 


228 SANDY POND 


RD 


458,300 


COLE, J. DANIEL 


21 GARLAND 


RD 


1,418,000 


COLEMAN, GEORGE A., JR. 


10 LIN WAY 


RD 


396,900 


COLLINS, DONALD 


16 GRASSHOPPER 


LN 


588,300 


COLLINS, LAURENCE A. 


24 TOWER 


RD 


436,400 


COMJEAN, MARC G. 


36 BYPASS 


RD 


403,200 


COMJEAN, MARLIES F. 


109 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


647,300 


COMO, FLORENCE J 


134 TOWER 


RD 


343,400 


CONE, THOMAS E, JR. 


5 SHORT HILL 


RD 


460,900 


CONNAUGHTON, JOHN 


33 LONG MEADOW 


RD 


395,700 



185 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 

CONNOLLY, JOSEPH F. 
CONRAD, PETER F. 
CONSTABLE, WILLIAM G. 
CONSTANTINE, KATHERINE P. 
CONWAY SUSAN E 
CONWAY, MARK 
COOK, CAROLINE R. 
COOK, PAUL W, JR. 
COOLIDGE, HENRY P. 
COOMBS, DANA M. 
COOPER, E. CRAWLEY 
COOPER, LORNAW. 
COOPER, THOMAS F. 
CORCORAN, ROBERT P. 
CORMACK, BARBARA J. 
CORONA REALTY TRUST 
CORT, CLIFFORD S. 
COTOIA, ANTHONY J. 
COTOIA, ANTHONYJ.TR. 
COTOIA, ANTHONYJ.TR. 
COTOIA, LUCY M. 
COTOIA, LUCY MARY ANNE 
COTONI, ARTHUR R 
COTONI, JOSEPH D..SR. 
COUGHLIN, MICHAEL 
COUSINS, DANIEL 
COUSINS, LAWRENCE B 
COWLES, ALEXANDRA C. 
CRADOCK-WATSON, GRACE L 
CRAIG, STANLEY R, JR. 
CRANDALL, STEPHEN H. 
CRAWFORD, HUGH J. 
CRAWFORD, JOHN D. 
CREEL, BUCKNERMIV 
CREIGHTON, G. ALEXANDER 
CRETELLA, HENRY A. 
CRITCH, WILLIAM E. 
CROMWELL, DARREN M. 
CRONIN, KIM A. 
CROSBY, DOUGLAS R 
CROSBY, DOUGLAS R. 
CROSBY, GREGORY J. 
CROWE, MARY B. 
CROWTHER, WILLIAM R. 
CSIMMA, ZOLTAN A. 
CUCINOTTA, NANCY J. 
CULVER, PERRY J. 



LOCATION 

46 CAMBRIDGE 

20 OLD SUDBURY 
244 LINCOLN 

146 BEDFORD 
40 HUCKLEBERRY 
9 MORNINGSIDE 
172 WESTON 
6 WHEELER 
83 LINCOLN 
96 PAGE 
6 SHORT HILL 

201 TOWER 
16 GARLAND 

5 OLD WINTER 

BROOKS 
140 LINCOLN 
28 OLD CONCORD 
263 LINCOLN 

UNDERWOOD 

UNDERWOOD 

16 LEWIS 
106 CONCORD 
104 CODMAN 
140 LINCOLN 

21 LONG MEADOW 

22 OLD FARM 

202 CONCORD 
156 TRAPELO 
140 LINCOLN 

63 CONANT 

25 TABOR HILL 
343 HEMLOCK 

20 OLD CONCORD 

32 LINCOLN 
117 LINCOLN 

17 STONEHEDGE 
31 STONEHEDGE 

300 CAMBRIDGE 
153 BEDFORD 
HILUARD 
9 HILUARD 

19 OAK MEADOW 

66 BEDFORD 

45 WINTER 

16 CONANT 

4L NORTH COMMONS 

30 BAKER BRIDGE 



TOTAL VALUE 

TP 302,400 

RD 609,600 

RD 316,200 

RD 272,800 

HL 758,500 

LN 332,800 

RD 384,500 

RD 487,000 

RD 803,600 

RD 456,500 

RD 514,700 

RD 493,800 

RD 1,125,500 

ST 474,500 

RD 198,200 

RD 232,400 

RD 832,900 

RD 414,100 

CR 123,000 

CR 127,100 

ST 194,000 

RD 228,100 

RD 405,900 

RD 228,400 

RD 424,600 

RD 359,600 

RD 340,900 

RD 350,800 

RD 270,900 

RD 660,800 

RD 534,500 

CR 206,000 

RD 547,000 

RD 491,700 

RD 349,000 

521,900 

488,600 

TP 100,000 

RD 372,200 

RD 27,900 

RD 540,600 

530,400 

RD 565,700 

ST 606,200 

RD 805,600 

206,400 

RD 787,700 



186 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


CUMMINGS, BRIAN F. 


188 CONCORD 


RD 


269,200 


CUMMINGS, WILLIAM R. 


40 BYPASS 


RD 


329,800 


CUNNINGHAM, CLAIRE 


11 ROCKWOOD 


LN 


245,800 


CUNNINGHAM, J. LEWIS 


139 TOWER 


RD 


345,900 


CUNNINGHAM, JAMES F. 


124 LEXINGTON 


RD 


292,800 


CUNNINGHAM, JONATHAN C, TRUST 


7 WOODCOCK 


LN 


530,800 


CURHAN, SHARON G. 


183 SANDY POND 


RD 


1,170,400 


CURREN, THOMAS 


82 WINTER 


ST 


357,100 


CURTIS, ELLIOT 


44 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


388,300 


CURTISS, ROBERT H. 


243 ASPEN 


CR 


278,000 


CYBULAK, STEPHEN J. 


15 BLACK BURNIAN 


RD 


608,200 


DALLOS, ANDRAS 


174 WESTON 


RD 


257,700 


D'AMICO RALPH P 


6 MILL STREET 


EX 


233,600 


D'AMICO RALPH P 


11 MILL STREET 


EX 


314,700 


D'AMICO, RALPH P. 


15 MILL STREET 


EX 


331,300 


D'AMICO, RALPH P. JR. 


37 MILL 


ST 


355,900 


D'AMICO, RALPH P., JR. 


33 MILL 


ST 


315,600 


DAMON, J. GILBERT 


13 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


362,000 


D'ANCONA, ILANA 


18 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


149,300 


DANIELS, CLAIRE M. 


165 BEDFORD 


RD 


279,000 


DANIELS, GROVER B. 


12 BROOKS 


HL 


521 ,500 


DANIELS, JANET B. 


SANDY POND 


RD 


38,300 


DANIELS, JANET B. 


39 SANDY POND 


RD 


567,300 


DANOFF, WILLIAM ANDREW 


41 STONY BROOK 


RD 


876,000 


DANZIGER, MICHAEL P. 


OLD CONCORD 


RD 


1,200 


DANZIGER, MICHAEL P. 


231 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


927,900 


DARLING, EUGENE M, JR. 


20 BOYCE FARM 


RD 


429,000 


DARLING, 0. LEONARD 


144TRAPELO 


RD 


542,100 


DARMAN, RICHARD G. 


231 ASPEN 


CR 


312,600 


D'ARRIGO BROTHERS CO. OF MASSA 


CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


40,900 


D'ARRIGO BROTHERS CO. OF MASSA 


CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


23,500 


D'ARRIGO BROTHERS CO. OF MASSA 


CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


34,800 


D'ARRIGO BROTHERS COMPANY OF M 


CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


72,000 


D'AUTREMONT, CHESTER C. 


30 BEAVER POND 


RD 


770,700 


D'AUTREMONT, RUTH W. 


56 BEAVER POND 


RD 


423,600 


DAVIS SHERMAN P. 


81 CONANT 


RD 


504,400 


DAVIS, JOHN H. 


7L SOUTH COMMONS 




253,000 


DAVIS, RONALD C. 


2 CONCORD 


RD 


383,800 


DAVIS, SHERMAN 


CONANT 


RD 


11,100 


DAVIS, SHERMAN P. 


CONANT 


RD 


275,400 


DAVIS, SHERMAN P. 


CONANT 


RD 


281,900 


DAVIS, SHERMAN P. 


CONANT 


RD 


247,800 


DAVIS, SHERMAN P. 


47 CONANT 


RD 


344,600 


DAVIS, SHERMAN P., TR. 


49 CONANT 


RD 


420,300 


DAVOLI, ROBERT E. 


6 WINCHELSEA 


LN 


231.200 


DAVOLI, ROBERT E. 


8 WINCHELSEA 


LN 


275,300 


DAWES, DONALD L. 


45 FARRAR 


RD 


386,800 



187 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1 996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


DE LA PENA, MIGUEL 


6 PARTRIDGE 


LN 


325,200 


DEAN, ANNE L 


28 FARRAR 


RD 


414,700 


DEAN, MAYBELLE L. 


CONANT 


RD 


37,300 


DEAN, ROBERT L 


26 FARRAR 


RD 


251 ,600 


DEAN, WILLIAM M. 


101 TOWER 


RD 


368,300 


DEBARYSHE, PAUL 


7 SUNNYSIDE 


LN 


283,900 


DECK, MARK J. 


11 BOYCEFARM 


RD 


633,000 


DEFILIPPO, JOHN P. 


94 LINCOLN 


RD 


458,000 


DEFRANCESCO, DEBRA L 


298 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


100,000 


DEGUGLIELMO, FLORENCE T. 


OXBOW 


RD 


1,600 


DELIA, JOHN A. 


26 ROUND HILL 


RD 


451,700 


DELORI, FRANCOIS C. 


44 TOWER 


RD 


643,300 


DEMIDOWITZ, WILLIAM 


7R SOUTH COMMONS 




242,000 


DENEHY, BERNADETTA 


PAGE 


RD 


178,400 


DENEHY, BERNADETTA J. 


141 LEXINGTON 


RD 


351 ,000 


DENEHY, EDWARD J, JR. 


139 LEXINGTON 


RD 


460,900 


DENHOLM, ALEC STUART, TR. 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


21 ,800 


DENHOLM, ALEC STUART, TR. 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


300 


DENHOLM, ALEC STUART, TR. 


222 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


630,600 


DENORMANDIE, ALICE W. 


LEXINGTON 


RD 


259,800 


DENORMANDIE, ALICE W. 


MINEBROOK 


RD 


301 ,300 


DENORMANDIE, ALICE W. 


4 MINEBROOK 


RD 


379,500 


DENORMANDIE, ELIANA L. 


45 TRAPELO 


RD 


673,371 


DENORMANDIE, PHILIP Y. 


PINE RIDGE 


RD 


26,700 


DENORMANDIE, ROBERT ET AL 


65 TRAPELO 


RD 


722,918 


DENORMANDIE, THOMAS 


CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


187,500 


DENORMANDIE, THOMAS L. 


CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


355,500 


DENORMANDIE, THOMAS L 


CONCORD 


RD 


16,300 


DENORMANDIE, THOMAS L. 


11 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


372,600 


DENORMANDIE, THOMAS L 


OLD WINTER 


ST 


284,900 


DENORMANDIE, THOMAS L. 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


34,100 


DENORMANDIE, THOMAS L. 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


306,600 


DENORMANDIE, THOMAS L. 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


32,000 


DENORMANDIE, THOMAS L. 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


21 ,800 


DENORMANDIE, THOMAS L 


TRAPELO 


RD 


16,200 


DERMADY, MARTIN B. 


16 FARRAR 


RD 


281 ,600 


DERMENJIAN, CHARLES 


31 BEDFORD 


LN 


213,400 


DESAI, SAMIR A. 


62 DAVISON 


DR 


794,900 


DESANTIS, JOSEPH M. 


54 LINCOLN 


RD 


393,500 


DESCOGNETS, GWENDOLYN G. 


69 WESTON 


RD 


639,600 


DESSAIN, TATIANA 


62 CONANT 


RD 


761 ,200 


DETWILER, PHYLLIS 


47 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


442,200 


DEWEY, E.S. 


112 TRAPELO 


RD 


618,700 


DEWEY, LAURIE T. 


79 LINCOLN 


RD 


673,200 


DEXTER, BARBARA C. 


27 OLD FARM 


RD 


512,100 


DIAB, THOMAS A. 


22 DEER RUN 


RD 


1 ,093,500 


DIADIUK, VICKY 


40 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


270,600 



188 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


DIARBAKERLY, MARK 


266 LINCOLN 


RD 


349,700 


DICKIE, RICHARD I. 


184 BEDFORD 


RD 


276,500 


DICKINSON, JOHN T. 


18 WHEELER 


RD 


653,200 


DIEBBOLL ROBERTS 


25 HILLSIDE 


RD 


378,800 


DIGIOVANNI, JAMES P. 


300 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


275,100 


DIGIOVANNI, JAMES P. 


173 TOWER 


RD 


266,800 


DILG, GILES 


11 LEWIS 


ST 


264,200 


DIMANCESCU, DAN P. 


52 BEDFORD 


RD 


537,300 


DINERSTEIN, GORDON 


32 WINDINGWOOD 


LN 


377,500 


DIXON, GEORGE L 


5 BROOKS 


RD 


470,100 


DIXON, RUSSELL J. 


1 BROOKS 


RD 


296,300 


DJR NOMINE TRUST 


28 WHEELER 


RD 


856,300 


DODNALSON, DONALD (EST) 


WESTON 


RD 


1,118 


DOHERTY, WILLIAM R. 


168 LINCOLN 


RD 


386,300 


DOHERTY, WILLIAM R. 


49 TOWER 


RD 


431,400 


DOHERTYS GARAGE, INC. 


161 LINCOLN 


RD 


575,800 


DOLAN, CHARLES B., TR. 


170 SANDY POND 


RD 


777,800 


DOLAN, PATRICK J. 


169 BEDFORD 


RD 


274,000 


DOUNSKY, LARRY R. 


44 GREENRIDGE 


LN 


225,700 


DONALD, AIDA DIPACE 


41 LINCOLN 


RD 


620,200 


DONALD, DAVID HERBERT 


46 LINCOLN 


RD 


341.700 


DONALD, DAVID HERBERT 


12R NORTH COMMONS 




248,800 


DONALDSON DAVID M 


22 WESTON 


RD 


967,200 


DONALDSON, ALAN L. 


279 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


299,600 


DONALDSON, ASTRID L. 


WESTON 


RD 


534 


DONALDSON, ASTRID L. 


16 WESTON 


RD 


493,000 


DONALDSON, DAVID M 


TRAPELO 


RD 


1,543 


DONALDSON, DAVID M. 


TOWER 


RD 


35,700 


DONALDSON, DAVID M. 


33 TOWER 


RD 


592,100 


DONALDSON, ELEANOR L. 


15 TRAPELO 


RD 


438,300 


DONALDSON, ELEANOR L. 


19 TRAPELO 


RD 


500,000 


DONALDSON, ELIZABETH C. 


144 WESTON 


RD 


518,500 


DONALDSON, JONATHAN D. 


7 OLD LEXINGTON 


RD 


809,000 


DONALDSON, MAGRUDER C. 


1 OLD LEXINGTON 


RD 


524,000 


DONALDSON, ROBERT L. 


291 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


265,200 


DONNELL, MARION L. TR. 


10 BLUEBERRY 


LN 


429,200 


DONOVAN, ANDREW E. 


76 BEDFORD 


RD 


563,100 


DONOVAN, DONNA M.(MRS. BYRNE) 


19 SUNNYSIDE 


LN 


297,400 


DOOLEY, THOMAS J. JR 


101 CONCORD 


RD 


197,700 


DOOLEY, THOMAS J. JR. 


109 CONCORD 


RD 


197,700 


DOOLEY, THOMAS J. JR. 


33 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


281 ,600 


DOOLEY, THOMAS J. JR. 


41 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


246,300 


DOOLEY, THOMAS J. JR. 


43 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


246,300 


DOUGHERTY, ALLEN R. 


25 OLD WINTER 


ST 


309,500 


DOUGHTY, JOSEPH M. 


31 CONANT 


RD 


287,900 


DOWNEY, EDWARD F., JR. 


25 FARRAR 


RD 


298,700 


DOWNING, DANIEL 


15 SUNNYSIDE 


LN 


280,900 



189 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


DOWNS, ELAINE R 


45 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


351 ,400 


DOWSE, AMY R. 


17 GRASSHOPPER 


LN 


503,100 


DRAGO, NICHOLAS V. 


35 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


403,100 


DRANE, DOUGLAS 


TODD POND 


RD 


794,200 


DRESSER, JOHN A. 


OXBOW 


RD 


1,600 


DREW, JOHN R. 


36B INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


86,000 


DREW, SHIRLEY D. 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


224,500 


DUBIN, STEVEN H. 


195 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


526,200 


DUBORG, GEORGE F. 


17 LONG MEADOW 


RD 


422,900 


DUMAINE, DEBORAH L 


9 ACORN 


LN 


382,500 


DUMONT, JOHN E. 


14 LIN WAY 


RD 


269,200 


DUNLAP, ARTHUR M. 


42 TODD POND 


RD 


124,300 


DUNN, BARBARA B. 


145 CHESTNUT 


CR 


299,100 


DUNN, LOUISE L 


11 OAK MEADOW 




529,200 


DURSO, MURIEL I., TR. 


234 ASPEN 


CR 


262,000 


DURSO, VINCENT 


10 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


211,100 


DUSTIN, RACHELS. 


219 SANDY POND 


RD 


370,600 


DUTKA, LOUISE 


3 GARLAND 


RD 


922,500 


EATON, JEFFERSON T. 


8 STOREY 


DR 


575,800 


ECKEL RICHARD W 


41 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


352,400 


ECKHARDT, HOMER D. 


27 LAUREL 


DR 


400,900 


ECKHOUSE, D. NOAH 


21 OAK MEADOW 




432,600 


EDES, FRANCIS D. 


37 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


294,700 


EDLUND, CAMPBELL MARGARET 


95 LEXINGTON 


RD 


375,900 


EGENDORF, ANDREW 


10 TOWER 


RD 


1,219,400 


ELDER, DOUGLAS H & LISA E 


38 BROOKS 


RD 


473,300 


ELIAS, DANIEL 


27 TOWER 


RD 


478,200 


ELKUS, HOWARD F. 


35 STONEHEDGE 




612,500 


ELLIOTT, MELODY 


90 CODMAN 


RD 


333,300 


ELLIOTT, MELODY 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


262,900 


ELLIOTT, PEGGY P. 


60 BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


516,800 


ELLIOTT, SCOTT M. 


37 BEAVER POND 


RD 


530,600 


ELLS, STEPHEN F. 


39 TODD POND 


RD 


104,200 


ELWOOD, DAVID M. 


8 BEDFORD 


LN 


325,600 


EMMONS, JUDITH R. 


46 WINDINGWOOD 


LN 


480,600 


ENGELS, DANIEL W. 


34 GREENRIDGE 


LN 


225,700 


ENGLAND, ALBERT 


OLD CONCORD 


RD 


27,800 


ENGLAND, ALBERT E. 


137 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


656,400 


ENGLAND, DANIEL III 


116 TRAPELO 


RD 


608,300 


EPHRAIM, NORMAN A. 


3 OAKDALE 


LN 


577,000 


EPPLING, FREDERIC J. 


12 SUNNYSIDE 


LN 


275,100 


EPSTEIN, ARNOLD M. 


47 WINTER 


ST 


469,200 


ESCHENROEDER.ALANQ. 


76 TODD POND 


RD 


528,100 


ESHLEMAN, DEAN B. 


89 LEXINGTON 


RD 


273,500 


ETCHEVERRYJULIANNE 


104 TODD POND 


RD 


607,000 


EVANGELISTA, FLORENZO 


48 MILL 


ST 


307,100 


FADDOUL, NATALIE A. 


41 FARRAR 


RD 


338,200 



190 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


FAIR VIEW REALTY, INC. 


27 SUNNYSIDE 


LN 


163,100 


FAIRBANKS, ALAN R. 


OXBOW 


RD 


2,000 


FAIRFAX, STEPHEN A. 


148 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


303,600 


FAIRLESS, BRUCE W. 


115 WINTER 


ST 


248,500 


FALENDER, ANDREW J. 


56 CONANT 


RD 


496,300 


FANEUIL HALL FLOWER MARKET, IN 


153 LEXINGTON 


RD 


467,000 


FANEUIL HALL FLOWER MKT. 


LEXINGTON 


RD 


202,500 


FARAN, JAMES J. JR., TR. 


23 TODD POND 


RD 


607,300 


FARGO, SUSAN C. 


7 MINEBROOK 


RD 


528,800 


FARNY, MICHAEL H. 


152 LINCOLN 


RD 


381 ,700 


FARNY, MICHAEL H. 


241 LINCOLN 


RD 


338,200 


FARRELL, PHILIP J. 


15 ACORN 


LN 


329,100 


FARROKH-PARS, FATEMEH V. 


353 HEMLOCK 


CR 


252,100 


FEHR, DAVID W. 


7 GOOSE POND 


RD 


564,000 


FEINBERG, NEIL 


104 CONCORD 


RD 


465,800 


FELEGIAN, PETER 


22 SUNNYSIDE 


LN 


279,800 


FELIX, JAMES E. 


15 GRANVILLE 


RD 


345,500 


FENIJN, YVONNE 


93 CONANT 


RD 


468,600 


FENTON, TERENCE 


25 WINTER 


ST 


403,300 


FERGUSON, EUNICE BICKFORD 


362 HEMLOCK 


CR 


208,900 


FERNALD, GEORGE H, JR. 


18 TODD POND 


RD 


716,400 


FERRI, EDWARD J. 


32 LONG MEADOW 


RD 


405,600 


FERRO, ARMAND F. 


253 LINCOLN 


RD 


313,900 


FICHERA, CATHERINE S. 


258 CONCORD 


RD 


220,000 


FINE, DAVID H. 


109 LEXINGTON 


RD 


503,400 


FINK, JAMES H. 


90 MILL 


ST 


646,100 


FINKELSTEIN, STAN 


117 LEXINGTON 


RD 


589,500 


FINNEGAN, LAURENCE M., TR. 


144 LINCOLN 


RD 


95,300 


FINNERTY, JAMES J. 


98 CODMAN 


RD 


309,400 


FINNERTY, RICHARD E. 


7 OLD FARM 


RD 


475,600 


FINUCANE, ANNM. 


20 TRAPELO 


RD 


743,700 


FISCALE, JOSEPH 


4 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


323,800 


FITZGERALD, DEREK J. 


12 JUNIPER RIDGE 


RD 


286,900 


FITZGERALD, JOHN H. 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


234,300 


FITZGERALD, MICHAEL 


15 SANDY POND 


RD 


1,116,400 


FLANNERY, CONSTANCE H. 


42 BROOKS 


RD 


445,900 


FLANNERY, DONALD J. JR 


82 VIRGINIA 


RD 


308,400 


FLANSBURGH, LOUISE H. 


225 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


562,000 


FLEMING, JAMES 


78 CODMAN 


RD 


351 ,700 


FLINT REALTY TRUST 


33 LEXINGTON 


RD 


369,000 


FLINT, EDWARD F & HENRY R 


28 LEXINGTON 


RD 


579,400 


FLINT, EDWARD F.& HENRY R. 


CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


27,200 


FLINT, EPHRAIM B. 


LEXINGTON 


RD 


32,100 


FLINT, EUGENIA N. 


321 HEMLOCK 


CR 


271 ,600 


FLINT, GEORGE EST. OF 


84 LEXINGTON 


RD 


406,900 


FLINT, JONATHAN A. 


93 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


594,400 


FLINT, MARGARET STEEVES 


27 LEXINGTON 


RD 


526,200 



191 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 

FLINT, PETER 

FLINT, WARREN F, JR. 

FLORY WILLIAMSON, ELIZABETH A 

FLUMMERFELT, J. KENT 

FLYNN, WILLIAM 

FOGG, STEPHEN K. TR. 

FOLEY, JOHN F. JR. 

FORBES DAVID L 

FORD, DAVID II 

FORTUNATO, FRANKS. 

FORTY-SEVEN COURT ST PROP INC 

FOSTER, GERALD L. 

FOSTER, J. EDWARD 

FOX DENIS M 

FRANCIS, HENRY A. 

FRANK, ESPEN 

FRANK, VELMA S. 

FRANKSTON, MICHAEL J. 

FRASER, JOANNE 

FRASER, ROBERT M. 

FRAZIER, MICHAEL F. 

FRAZIER, MICHAEL F. 

FREED, CHARLES 

FREEDMAN, JOELS. 

FRENCH, JOHN B. 

FREUD, SOPHIE 

FRIEDMAN, ELEANOR F. 

FRONDUTO CAROL M 

FROST, RAINER L 

FROST, WESLEY T. 

FULFORD, MARION L 

FUSILLO, CONCETTA G. 

GABLE, BRUCE KENT 

GAILEY, TIMOTHY H. 

GALLITANO, ELEANOR M. 

GALLITANO, ELEANOR M. 

GALLUP, WILLIAM A. JR. 

GANNON, JOHN J. 

GANZ, SUSAN J. 

GARDENT, HARRIET V TR 

GARGILL, LYNN AVERY 

GARGILL, ROBERT M. 

GARGILL, ROBERT M. 

GARMORY, GEORGE F. 

GARNER, ROBERT N. 

GARRISON, BARBARA F. 

GARRISON, DAVID L & ALICE E 



LOCATION 

80 LEXINGTON 
39 LEXINGTON 

108 CONCORD 
11 SMITH 
11 ORCHARD 
58 BIRCHWOOD 
60 LINCOLN 
38 OLD WINTER 
91 WESTON 
36 GREENRIDGE 
27 GREENRIDGE 

141 SOUTH GREAT 

207 TOWER 

250 SOUTH GREAT 

16 SUNNYSIDE 

14 MORNINGSIDE 

19 TWIN POND 
170 TOWER 

18 BIRCHWOOD 

90 BEDFORD 
GRANVILLE 

18 GRANVILLE 

16 BROWNING 
38 LAUREL 

135 WESTON 

34 LAUREL 

18 BAKER BRIDGE 
19A SOUTH COMMONS 

38 LINCOLN 
233 LINCOLN 
102 CONCORD 

21 DEER RUN 
219 CONCORD 
160 BEDFORD 

LINCOLN 
232 LINCOLN 
123 CHESTNUT 
OXBOW 

80 TRAPELO 

334 HEMLOCK 

324 HEMLOCK 

BEDFORD 

58 BEDFORD 

21 BYPASS 
315 HEMLOCK 

208 OLD CONCORD 

17 OLD LEXINGTON 



TOTAL VALUE 

RD 465,400 

RD 549,800 

RD 259,100 

HL 721,800 

LN 376,800 

LN 337,600 

RD 378,900 

ST 938,500 

RD 614,400 

LN 226,400 

LN 151,800 

RD 361 ,300 

RD 390,600 

RD 267,800 

LN 269,600 

LN 243,100 

LN 564,000 

RD 659,800 

LN 350,000 

RD 332,600 

RD 113,500 

RD 421,800 

LN 550,300 

DR 442,300 

RD 628,300 

DR 494,600 

RD 995,900 
188,500 

RD 453,800 

RD 358,800 

RD 221.500 

RD 589,100 

RD 313,100 

RD 310,000 

RD 25,600 

RD 852,100 

CR 244,100 

RD 800 

RD 1,080,200 

CR 316,700 

CR 315,100 

RD 331,100 

RD 1,473,700 

RD 243,800 

CR 224,300 

RD 621,400 

RD 414,300 



192 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1 996 



OWNER NAME 

GATCHELL, JR. G. GORDON 
GAUVIN, MARY LOU 
GAYLEY, MARY 
GECHIJIAN.ARAK. 
GECHTER, JERRY 
GEFTER, MALCOLM L. 
GENOVESE, JOSEPH C. 
GENTILE, KATHLEEN P., TR. 
GERSON, NATHANIEL C. 
GERSTEIN, DEBORAH A. 
GERTZ, DWIGHT L. 
GETCHELL-FORBES, MAYNARD C. 
GHIORSE. JOHNT. Ill 
GIENAPP, WILLIAM E. 
GIESE, LUCRETIA H 
GIESE, PAULE. 
GILBERT, KEITH M. 
GILLESPIE THADDEUSR 
GILLIS, JOHNG. 
GILMORE, DEBORAH D. 
GIMBEL, KATHERINE 
GIMBEL, KATHERINE J. 
GIURLEO, JAMES M. 
GLANZ, MARCY 
GLASS, JOHN B. 
GLENDON, RICHARD 
GLEYSTEEN JUDITH A 
GODDARD, RICHARD B. 
GOLDBLATT.MARKJ. 
GOLDEN, SYLVIA H. 
GOLDHIRSH NEIL R 
GOODWIN, MARGARET M. 
GOODWIN, SUSAN M. 
GORDON KATHY LEE 
GORDON, ALLEN 
GORDON, BRADLEY W. 
GORDON. MARTHA S. 
GORDON, MICHAELS. 
GORDON, PETER D. 
GRABILL, MARTHA L. 
GRADDIS, RICHARD D. 
GRAF, JEANNETTE 
GRAHAM NORMA J 
GRAHAM, CYNTHIA A 
GRANT, WILLIAM R. 
GRASON, EDNA B 
GRASSO, MASSIMO P. 



LOCATION 

127 BEDFORD 

68 WINTER 

20 HILLSIDE 
FOX RUN 

34 RIDGE 

46 BAKER BRIDGE 

27 MILL 
103 PAGE 
127 TRAPELO 
255 LINCOLN 
137 WESTON 
34C INDIAN CAMP 
15A SOUTH COMMONS 

15 MEADOWBROOK 
154 TRAPELO 

32 TOWER 

61 SANDY POND 
130 TRAPELO 

9 PAGE 
18R INDIAN CAMP 

CONCORD 
167 CONCORD 
NORTH GREAT 

15 FOX RUN 

7 BAKER BRIDGE 
156 CHESTNUT 
211 LINCOLN 

3 BOWLES 

8 SHORT HILL 
15 OLD SUDBURY 

144 SANDY POND 
8B NORTH COMMONS 

26C INDIAN CAMP 

136 LINCOLN 

323 HEMLOCK 
42 GREENRIDGE 

361 HEMLOCK 

220 TOWER 

22A INDIAN CAMP 

22 BIRCHWOOD 
BEDFORD 

215 LINCOLN 

7 OAK MEADOW 
40L INDIAN CAMP 
74 BIRCHWOOD 
143 BEDFORD 

23 BROOKS 



TOTAL VALUE 

RD 309,800 

ST 393,500 

RD 425,500 

RD 5,000 

RD 170,500 

RD 685,700 

ST 585,600 

RD 289,400 

RD 411,800 

RD 315,700 

RD 491,400 

LN 152,600 

184,700 

RD 417,100 

RD 459,600 

RD 458,200 

RD 1,004,400 

RD 378,700 

RD 654,700 

LN 228,400 

RD 10,600 

RD 279,800 

RD 46,400 

RD 470,700 

RD 397,700 

CR 207,900 

RD 341,500 

TR 244,600 

RD 579,900 

RD 512,200 

RD 1 ,424,300 
86,000 

LN 86,000 

RD 252,500 

CR 289,000 

LN 235,400 

CR 227,900 

RD 866,700 

LN 150,700 

LN 277,100 

RD 24,500 

RD 272,400 

542,100 

LN 110,000 

LN 289,700 

RD 371,400 

RD 427,300 



193 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1 996 



OWNER NAME 
GRAY, JESSIE KURZON 
GRAY, LESLIE M III 
GRAY, PATRICIA D. 
GREAVES, ALLAN W. 
GRECO, CARMINE A., TR. 
GREELEY, JAMES M. 
GREEN SCOTT 
GREEN, DAVID H. 
GREEN, JERRY R. 
GREEN, JOAN C, TR. 
GREEN.MYRAJ. 
GREEN, ROBERT V. 
GREEN, SCOTT 
GREENBERG, SANDRA L 
GREENBERGER, JOELS. 
GREENE, CATHERINE R., TR. 
GREENE, KATHLEEN M. 
GREENHILL, LINCOLN 
GREESON, JOSEPH B. 
GREETHAM, DOUGLAS E. 
GRIEMAN, ERIC J. 
GRIGGS, ANNETTE M. 
GRIM, WILLIAM M., JR. 
GRIMANIS, MICHAEL P., TR. 
GRINDLAY, JONATHAN E. 
GRINNELL, VIRGINIA B. 
GROSS, GERALD R. 
GROSS, THOMAS A.O. 
GROSSMAN, RANDY L. 
GROVER, C. STUART 
GROVES, ALLAN M. 
GUARINO, GUYE. 
GULDBERG, PETER 
GULDBERG, PETER H. 
GUMMERE, JOHNL. 
GUNDY, JENNIFER MORRIS 
GUNDY, WILLIAM E. 
GUSTAFSON, J. KENNETH 
GUSTAVSON, GLENN O. 
GUTHKE, KARLS. 
GUY, M. CYNTHIA 
GYFTOPOULOS, ELIAS P. 
HAARSTICK, RAYMOND K 
HAARSTICK, RAYMOND K 
HAARTZ, BEATRICE R 
HABER, STUART S. 
HADLEY, HENRY H. 



LOCATION 

14 OLD WINTER ST 
42 BEDFORD RD 

3 GOOSE POND RD 

5 ROCKWOOD LN 

245 TOWER RD 

15 LINWAY RD 
1 OAKDALE LN 

207 OLD CONCORD RD 

59 TOWER RD 

153 TOWER RD 

46 ROUND HILL RD 
21 TOWER RD 

5 OAKDALE LN 

341 HEMLOCK CR 

28 BLUEBERRY LN 

18 CERULEAN WY 

153 CHESTNUT CR 

126 LEXINGTON RD 

14 MINEBROOK RD 

12 BIRCHWOOD LN 

32C INDIAN CAMP LN 

47 DEERHAVEN RD 
174 SANDY POND RD 

LINCOLN RD 

195 LINCOLN RD 

33 BEAVER POND RD 
8A NORTH COMMONS 

230 CONCORD RD 

18L INDIAN CAMP LN 

14 MOCCASIN HL 
183 TOWER RD 

20 DEER RUN RD 

OLD CONCORD RD 

263 OLD CONCORD RD 

15 LEWIS ST 
8 BOWLES TR 
3 OAK MEADOW 

146 SOUTH GREAT RD 

59 WESTON RD 

36 HILLSIDE RD 

34 TOWER RD 
241 TOWER RD 

OLD COUNTY ROAD EX 

206 OLD COUNTY ROAD EX 

32 HILLSIDE RD 

16 LONG MEADOW RD 
73 OLD COUNTY RD 



TOTAL VALUE 

1 ,496,900 
692,400 
623,600 
226,000 
610,800 
386,000 
698,000 
691,300 
765,000 
608,600 
977,500 
654,900 
518,500 
353,100 
737,200 
275,400 
244,100 
275,200 
758,900 
313,600 
86,000 
399,500 
333,900 

3.300 
668,300 
469,200 
178,400 
335,400 
230,700 
397,300 
454,300 
654,200 

5,600 
1,178,100 
414,900 
274,600 
510,400 
349,500 
522,200 
345,900 
502,200 
749,400 
22,400 
802,200 
41 1 ,500 
463,000 
474,300 



194 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


HADLOCK, CHARLES R. 


223 SANDY POND 


RD 


524,500 


HAESSLER, DIANE F. 


15 STONEHEDGE 




497,600 


HAGGERTY, JOHN S. 


5 PARTRIDGE 


LN 


392,700 


HAGGERTY, NANCY L 


171 TOWER 


RD 


322,500 


HAGMANN, EST. OF OTTO 


OLD COUNTY 


RD 


353,300 


HALES, CHARLES A. 


32 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


473,400 


HALL ANDREW Fill 


71 SANDY POND 


RD 


612,200 


HALLSTEIN, HAROLD A. Ill 


90 LEXINGTON 


RD 


607,900 


HALPERN, NICHOLAS 


225 SANDY POND 


RD 


454,600 


HALPIN, PATRICIA 


6C NORTH COMMONS 




185,900 


HAMILTON, TIMOTHY D. 


207 SANDY POND 


RD 


493,200 


HAMILTON, WILLIAM L 


126 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


378,300 


HAMMOND III, JOHNS. 


46 WINTER 


ST 


494,100 


HAMMOND III, JOHNS. 


52 WINTER 


ST 


281,900 


HAMMOND, JOHN S. Ill 


WINTER 


ST 


16,200 


HANANIA, BARBARA M. 


297 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


217,300 


HANLON.MARYG. 


223 ASPEN 


CR 


282,800 


HANSEN, C. RUSSEL, JR. 


15 LINCOLN 


RD 


602,400 


HANSON, MADELINE A, TR. 


15 HILLSIDE 


RD 


349,400 


HAPGOOD, NORMAN, JR. 


69 PAGE 


RD 


397,900 


HARDER, DAVID W. 


112 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


590,300 


HARDING, DAVID R. 


81 LINCOLN 


RD 


786,600 


HARDING, DOUGLAS BURNHAM 


7 LONG MEADOW 


RD 


388,700 


HARDING, SHEILA C. 


1 RIDGE 


RD 


167,600 


HARDMAN, ANNA M. 


17 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


515,300 


HARGREAVES-HEALD, GEOFFREY 


24 SANDY POND 


RD 


658,500 


HAROIAN, HENRY A., TR. 


270 LINCOLN 


RD 


319,200 


HARRINGTON, CLIFFORD F, JR. 


BLACK BURNIAN 


RD 


4,600 


HARRINGTON, CLIFFORD F., JR. 


348 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


290,700 


HARRINGTON, NANCY 


BEDFORD 


RD 


48,500 


HARRINGTON, WINTHROP W JR 


122 TOWER 


RD 


906,458 


HARRINGTON, WINTHROP W., JR. 


TOWER 


RD 


20,100 


HARRIS, DAVID R. 


4 BOWLES 


TR 


241,700 


HARRIS, ERIC A. 


138 BEDFORD 


RD 


442,500 


HARRIS, EVELYN B. 


39 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


318,100 


HARRIS, MELVYN H. 


19 CONANT 


RD 


559,300 


HARRISON, HENRY F. 


18 WINTER 


ST 


720,600 


HARRISON, HENRY F. DUP. 


WINTER 


ST 


23,200 


HARRISON, HENRY F. DUP. 


WINTER 


ST 


21,300 


HARVEY, FRANK L 


5 BOYCE FARM 


RD 


593,600 


HARVEY, ROY L. 


40 STONEHEDGE 




471 .200 


HATFIELD CHARLES H 


21 GREENRIDGE 


LN 


218,700 


HATSOPOULOS REALTY TRUST 


21 CERULEAN 


WY 


30,500 


HATSOPOULOS REALTY TRUST 


25 CERULEAN 


WY 


247,900 


HATSOPOULOS, GEORGE N. 


233 TOWER 


RD 


1,119,600 


HATSOPOULOS, JOHN N. 


3 WOODCOCK 


LN 


1 ,097,800 


HAWES, DONALD 0. 


7 HUNTLEY 


LN 


333,200 



195 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


HAWKES, GREGORY A. 


237 TOWER 


RD 


517,400 


HAYDOCK, GALE S. 


203 LINCOLN 


RD 


508,600 


HAYES, OLIVER W, JR. 


261 CONCORD 


RD 


335,500 


HAYES, WILSON C. 


161 TOWER 


RD 


442,800 


HEALEY, JEANNE C. 


116 CHESTNUT 


CR 


201,100 


HEALTH CARE PROPERTY INVESTORS 


TRAPELO 


RD 


300 


HEALY, EDWARD M. 


15 MOCCASIN 


HL 


422,200 


HEART, FRANK E. 


94 CONANT 


RD 


492,100 


HECHT, NORMAN B. 


8 LAUREL 


DR 


438,700 


HECK, STANLEY 


BEDFORD 


RD 


36,000 


HECK, STANLEY 


23 BEDFORD 


RD 


1,213,100 


HECK, STANLEY 


HILLIARD 


RD 


25,600 


HECK, STANLEY 


HILLIARD 


RD 


24,200 


HECK, STANLEY 


HILLIARD 


RD 


23,900 


HECK, STANLEY 


HILLIARD 


RD 


27,500 


HEIJN.CORNEUS, JR. 


165 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


304,900 


HELLER, ERIC J. 


55 BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


897,700 


HELLER, THOMAS M. 


8 UPLAND FIELD 


RD 


491 ,700 


HELLMUTH, JOSEPH A. 


5 WILLARCH 


RD 


302,200 


HENDERSON, JAMES R. 


6 GILES 


RD 


349,800 


HENDERSON, ROBERTS. 


GILES 


RD 


17,400 


HENDRICKSON, ROBERTA. 


253 CONCORD 


RD 


294,700 


HERBERT, LAUREN 


3D SOUTH COMMONS 




98,000 


HERLACHER, LARRY R. 


7 BROOKS 


HL 


548,600 


HERMAN, PETER P. 


39 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


237,200 


HERSCH, CHARLES 


131 TRAPELO 


RD 


350,300 


HERSCHBACH, DUDLEY R. 


116 CONANT 


RD 


512,700 


HERTHEL, EVELYN S. 


CONCORD 


RD 


45,500 


HERTHEL, EVELYN S. 


199 CONCORD 


RD 


664,100 


HESTER, LEON B. 


HILLIARD 


RD 


26,800 


HESTER, LEON B. 


14 HILLIARD 


RD 


599,200 


HEWITT, ELIZABETH C. 


31 BAKER FARM 




401 ,800 


HIBBEN, GEORGE C & JULIA K 


WESTON 


RD 


30,000 


HIBBEN, GEORGE C & JULIA K.TRS 


WESTON 


RD 


255,200 


HIBBEN, GEORGE C & JULIA K.TRS 


WESTON 


RD 


19,400 


HIBBEN, GEORGE C & JULIA KTRS 


75 WESTON 


RD 


594,200 


HIBBEN, GEORGE C. 


73 WESTON 


RD 


277,000 


HICKOK, JONATHAN S. 


270 CONCORD 


RD 


406,000 


HICKS, ROBERTO 


129 TOWER 


RD 


335,700 


HIERONYMUS, RAMELLE M. 


13 OAK MEADOW 




493,900 


HIGGINS, PETER I. 


226 TOWER 


RD 


618,200 


HILL, CRAIG C. 


72 WINTER 


ST 


604,800 


HILL.JOHNE.TR. 


57 TODD POND 


RD 


127,900 


HIMAWAN, JEFF 


61 OXBOW 


RD 


317,200 


HINDS, EDITH M. 


36 GOOSE POND 


RD 


651,400 


HINGSTON, JOSEPH A. 


115 MILL 


ST 


298,300 


HITCHCOCK, NANCYS. 


6 PAGE FARM 


RD 


564,000 



196 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


HOAR, NORMAN W. 


256 LINCOLN 


RD 


315,800 


HOBBS BROOK FARM PROPERTY 


CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


19,700 


HOBBS BROOK FARM PROPERTY 


268 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


817,200 


HOBEN, ALLAN 


30 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


317,000 


HOCH, ALFRED D. 


149 TOWER 


RD 


301 ,200 


HOCH, REIMAR H.H. 


FARRAR 


RD 


197,700 


HOCH, REIMAR H.H. 


49 TODD POND 


RD 


75,000 


HOCHBERG, BETSY B. 


99 TRAPELO 


RD 


780,500 


HOEHLER HARRY H 


332 HEMLOCK 


CR 


250,600 


HOFF, CHARLES J. 


10 SMITH 


HL 


634,900 


HOFFMAN, STEVEN 


208 TOWER 


RD 


724,100 


HOGAN, JAMES 


32D INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


130,000 


HOLBERTON, PHILIP V. 


151 TOWER 


RD 


529,200 


HOLBROOK, GEORGE 


42D INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


98,000 


HOLCOMB, ROBERTO 


37 BLACK BURNIAN 


RD 


968,600 


HOLDEN, LAWRENCE T. JR., TRUST 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


33,500 


HOLDEN, SARAH 


WESTON 


RD 


221,200 


HOLDEN, SARAH C. 


WESTON 


RD 


24,000 


HOLDEN, SARAH C. 


60 WESTON 


RD 


1,382,100 


HOLLAND, PETER A. 


8 PINE RIDGE 


RD 


312,400 


HOLLAND, TAFFY K., TRUSTEE 


44 BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


558,200 


HOLLINGSWORTH MARK JR 


8 SANDY POND 


RD 


483,800 


HOLLINGSWORTH SUSAN H 


7 LINCOLN 


RD 


893,000 


HOLLINGSWORTH, CURTIS 


40 BEAVER POND 


RD 


606,600 


HOLLINGSWORTH, LOWELL M. 


18 TWIN POND 


LN 


542,800 


HOLLISTER, WALTER M. 


139 BEDFORD 


RD 


348,500 


HOLMES DUNBAR 


122 CHESTNUT 


CR 


206,000 


HOLWAY, THERESA M. 


5 FORESTER 


RD 


444,400 


HOPENGARTEN, FREDRIC J. 


6 WILLARCH 


RD 


313,100 


HOPKINS JOANNA 


7 LINWAY 


RD 


341,200 


HOPKINS, MARK 


8 CEDAR 


RD 


368,400 


HOPKINS, ROBERT P. 


48 BEDFORD 


RD 


386,100 


HOPLAND, JANEGIL 


18 DEER RUN 


RD 


709,900 


HORGEN, TURID 


216 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


525,300 


horne.benjamin.tr. 


26 TODD POND 


RD 


572,000 


HORWITZ, PATRICIA F., TR. 


68 CONANT 


RD 


638,000 


HOUGHTON, LILLIAN 


77 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


143,400 


HOUTZEEL, ALEXANDER 


233 ASPEN 


CR 


334,400 


HOWLAND, WESTON 


PAGE 


RD 


264,900 


HOWLAND, WESTON III 


PAGE 


RD 


179,000 


HOWLAND, WESTON III 


40 PAGE 


RD 


910,400 


HSIA, JAMES & MITZI KIUNG 


10 MILL STREET 


EX 


229,700 


HSU, CHENG-PEI 


3 OAK KNOLL 


RD 


239,300 


HSU, LEE KG. 


20 BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


644,100 


HSU, MICHAEL SHIH 


56 ROUND HILL 


RD 


594,800 


HUANG, TAI-SAN, TR. 


12 ACORN 


LN 


350,800 


HUBBARD, ELIOT 


24 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


289,000 



197 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 

HUBBARD, JASON C, TR. 

HUBBARD, JONATHAN V. 

HUBLEY, PAMELA B. 

HUG, CHRISTOPHER N. 

HUGHES ROBERT C 

HULL, KENNETH R. 

HUNSAKER FAMILY REALTY TRUST 

HUNSAKER LAND COMPANY, INC. 

HUNTER IAN W 

HUNTER, BRUCE, TR. 

HURD KENNETH E 

HURFF, JOSEPH L 

HYNES, MICHAEL V. 

IDE, KENTON J. 

ILIESCU, NICOLAE 

IMMEL, STEPHEN G. 

INGARD, SVEN ERIK 

IRELAND, DAVID G. 

IRWIN, MARY M. 

IVES, KATHERINE C. 

IVY REALTY TR 

IVY REALTY TR 

IVY REALTY TR 

IVY REALTY TR 

IVY REALTY TR 

IVY REALTY TRUST 

JACKSON, EST. OF GARDNER, JR. 

JACKSON, HUSON 

JACOBS, DAVID 

JACOBS, RICHARD B. 

JACOBY, ANNA. 

JACQUET, ERNEST K 

JAHRUNG, ROBERT V. Ill 

JAMES, HAMILTON R. 

JAMES, HAMILTON R. 

JAMIESON.WENDYJ. 

JANES, G. SARGENT EST OF 

JARVIS, NANCY L, TR. 

JERODEL REALTY TRUST 

JERODEL REALTY TRUST 

JERODEL REALTY TRUST 

JEVON, ROBERT W, JR. 

JEWETT, JULIE DAVIS 

JIN, JIAN 

JOHNSEN, ROBERT U, TR. 

JOHNSON, EDWARD A. 

JOHNSON, ERNEST L. 



LOCATION 

5 WOODS END 
123 TRAPELO 

15 OLD COUNTY 
18 BEAVER POND 
27 STOREY 

189 TOWER 

155 WESTON 
WESTON 

6 OAKDALE 

10 LEWIS 

21 LEXINGTON 
24 HILLSIDE 

11 STONEHEDGE 
178 SOUTH GREAT 

36 DEERHAVEN 
31 LAUREL 

34 TABOR HILL 
9 SMITH 

40 BAKER BRIDGE 
70 BEDFORD 

CANAAN 

CANAAN 

CANAAN 

CANAAN 

CANAAN 

27 CANAAN 

35 HILLSIDE 

37 TABOR HILL 
192 SANDY POND 
213 SANDY POND 

126 CHESTNUT 
49 ROUND HILL 

10 GRASSHOPPER 
WINTER 
78 WINTER 
10D NORTH COMMONS 

34 CONANT 

274 LINCOLN 

WINTER 

WINTER 
63 WINTER 

9 TRAPELO 

28 WINTER 
84 CODMAN 

155 CHESTNUT 

127 TOWER 

1 GRASSHOPPER 



TOTAL VALUE 

RD 501,900 

RD 364,600 

RD 351,100 

RD 408,300 

DR 593,900 

RD 401 ,900 

RD 839,200 

RD 37,315 

LN 595,800 

ST 474,800 

RD 1 ,065,300 

RD 318,100 

549,100 

RD 305,200 

RD 337,000 

DR 457,500 

RD 436,600 

HL 640,500 

RD 640,800 

RD 633,300 

DR 38,400 

DR 44,200 

DR 16,100 

DR 31,300 

DR 29,600 

DR 1,030,400 

RD 344,300 

RD 518.100 

RD .574,700 

RD 871,000 

CR 224,000 

RD 656,900 

LN 463,700 

ST 20,900 

ST 1,136,000 

229,600 

RD 395,500 

RD 339,500 

ST 160,600 

ST 82,000 

ST 804,500 

RD 445,400 

ST 557,600 

RD 261,300 

CR 258,700 

RD 417,200 

LN 488,500 



198 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


JOHNSON, ERNEST L. 


146 LINCOLN 


RD 


142,800 


JOHNSON, ERNEST L. 


146A LINCOLN 


RD 


132,600 


JOHNSON, H.W. 


29 GOOSE POND 


RD 


560,400 


JOHNSON, KENNETH A. 


138 SANDY POND 


RD 


380,000 


JOHNSON, KIMMOND A. 


RED RAIL FARM 




22,500 


JOHNSON, KIMMOND A. 


RED RAIL FARM 




28,200 


JOHNSON, KIMMOND ALLAN 


RED RAIL FARM 




1,653 


JOHNSON, KIMMOND ALLAN 


22 RED RAIL FARM 




345,700 


JOHNSON, LAURIE 


9D SOUTH COMMONS 




183,500 


JOHNSON, RICHARD 


8 MACKINTOSH 


LN 


637,100 


JOHNSON, ROLLIN 


118 LEXINGTON 


RD 


365,600 


JOHNSON, STEPHEN P. 


10 TWIN POND 


LN 


831,100 


JOHNSTON, CAROLYN B. 


246 ASPEN 


CR 


301 ,600 


JULIANO, PAUL J. 


19 ORCHARD 


LN 


128,700 


KAFINA MARTIN J 


5 GILES 


RD 


330,800 


KALAJIAN, MICHAEL H.,JR. 


11 BYPASS 


RD 


545,100 


KALBA, KONRAD K 


23 SANDY POND 


RD 


459,100 


KANEB, PATRICIAA.TR. 


55 SANDY POND 


RD 


1,469,100 


KANENAKA, JANET F, TR. 


225 ASPEN 


CR 


310,500 


KANIA, JOHN V. 


91 TOWER 


RD 


390,900 


KANZER, WILLIAM M. 


9 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


321,900 


KAO, PETER SIAO-SUNG/MEI-LIN 


24 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


552,700 


KASPARIAN, CAROL D 


36 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


443,100 


KASS, EDWARD H. 


16 TODD POND 


RD 


850,300 


KASSNER, MICHAEL A. 


15 CONANT 


RD 


550,000 


KATSUKI DAVID 


226 CONCORD 


RD 


529,300 


KATZ, ISADORE 


10 OAK MEADOW 




594,000 


KATZ, SAUL L, TR. 


42 WINDINGWOOD 


LN 


361,400 


KAUFMAN, MARCIAW. 


109 TRAPELO 


RD 


388,900 


KAYE, HAROLD 


12 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


259,400 


KEARNEY, J KENNETH 


203 SANDY POND 


RD 


1 ,036,400 


KEAY, DONALD P. 


12 BOYCEFARM 


RD 


398,300 


KEEVIL, CHARLES S. JR. 


134 TRAPELO 


RD 


466,100 


KEILEY, PHILIP L 


30R INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


130,000 


KELLEHER, ROBERT J. 


25 LONG MEADOW 


RD 


430,100 


KELLER, JOHN F. 


TOWER 


RD 


23,700 


KELLER, JOHN F. 


105 TOWER 


RD 


460,400 


KELLETT, ANN MARIE 


2D NORTH COMMONS 




186,300 


KELLEY, ANDREW J. 


33 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


312,200 


KELMAN, JONATHAN L. 


7 BOWLES 


TR 


262,800 


KENDRICK, MARVIN H, JR. 


WESTON 


RD 


600 


KENNEDY LAND CORPORATION 


WINTER 


ST 


18,200 


KENNEDY, ALBERT E. 


OLD COUNTY 


RD 


20,400 


KENNEDY, ALBERT E. EST OF 


121 WINTER 


ST 


263,800 


KENNEDY, DONALD G. 


143 CHESTNUT 


CR 


264,100 


KENNEDY, JOHN P. 


22 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


450,100 


KENNEDY, JOHN T. 


129 WINTER 


ST 


414,300 



199 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


KERN, EDWARD C, JR. 


41 LAUREL 


DR 


466,200 


KERREBROCK, BERNICE M., TR. 


108 TOWER 


RD 


495,500 


KESSEL, JOSEPH B. 


9 HUNTLEY 


LN 


306,000 


KETTERINGHAM, SUSAN M. 


234 CONCORD 


RD 


458,500 


KEUTMANN, MARIE 


12 RED RAIL FARM 




263,800 


KEYES, JANET T 


130 LEXINGTON 


RD 


275,900 


KIEFER MAXINE E 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


275,500 


KILEY, CHRISTOPHER C. 


42B INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


149,700 


KIM, ADELINE 


16C NORTH COMMONS 




185,900 


KIM, SUNGWOON 


OLD CONCORD 


RD 


300 


KIM, SUNGWOON 


253 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


637,400 


KIM, YANG J. 


20 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


271,100 


KIMBALL, JOAN C.F. 


14 HILLSIDE 


RD 


388,100 


KIMNACH, ELIZABETH 


222 ASPEN 


CR 


266,500 


KINDLEBERGER. SARAH 


12A NORTH COMMONS 




178,400 


KING, CHARLES III 


12 STOREY 


DR 


525,500 


KING, ELEANOR T. 


97 WESTON 


RD 


383,700 


KING, PAY-SHIN 


6 ORCHARD 


LN 


305,100 


KING, WILLIAM A. 


57 LINCOLN 


RD 


368,800 


KIRKPATRICK, MARGARET M. 


17 OLD FARM 


RD 


434,000 


KISTIAKOWSKY, IRMA E 


106 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


44,700 


KISTIAKOWSKY, IRMA E. 


106 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


576,000 


KITSES, STEVEN J. 


38 LONG MEADOW 


RD 


431,700 


KJELLANDER, MARY H. 


8 SUNNYSIDE 


LN 


316,200 


KLANDRUD, SUE ANN LACHANCE 


14 SILVER BIRCH 


LN 


333,400 


KLEIN, JANIS & FINK. SUSAN 


311 HEMLOCK 


CR 


209,200 


KLEM, CHRISTOPHER A. 


168 TRAPELO 


RD 


491,200 


KLEM, WALTER 


41 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


314,600 


KLING, JOHN D. 


47 FARRAR 


RD 


276.600 


KLOBUCHAR, JOHN A. & MARIBETH 


27 CONANT 


RD 


433,000 


KNOWLTON, ANNE RAKER 


49 STONEHEDGE 




564,900 


KNOX, WENDELL J. 


33 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


168,400 


KNOX, WENDELL J. 


4 LAUREL 


DR 


498,300 


KO NAI N 


40 TABOR HILL 


RD 


571,000 


KO, NAI NAN 


27 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


625,600 


KOCHMANN, CAROL C. 


9 BROOKS 


HL 


472,500 


KOEHLER, EDWARD F. 


10 HIDDENWOOD 


PT 


337,100 


KOHLI, GURMANDER S, TR. 


22 WARBLER SPRINGS 


RD 


1 ,733,500 


KOLBIN, LAWRENCE 


68 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


354,300 


KOLLER, LAURA F. 


10B NORTH COMMONS 




120,000 


KOLLIGIAN, ZOE & GREGORY, TRS 


15 DEER RUN 


RD 


896,900 


KOLOW, RICHARD D. 


148 SANDY POND 


RD 


1 ,478,300 


KONSTANDAKIS, NICHOLAS 


22 OLD CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


433,000 


KORNFELD, GEORGE R. 


14 ORCHARD 


LN 


271,500 


KOUMANTZELIS, ARTHUR G. 


38 ROUND HILL 


RD 


766,700 


KOUPAS, WILLIAM V. 


8 BROOKS 


HL 


550,600 


KRAFT, ALFRED L. 


20 FARRAR 


RD 


341,200 



200 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 

KRAMP. RUSSELL K. 
KREIDLER.ANNEH. 
KROIN, LAWRENCE E. 
KROUK-GORDON DAFNA TR 
KUBIK, JAMES C. 
KUHNS, ROGER J. 
KUHNS, ROGER J. 
KULKA, J. PETER 
KULKA, J. PETER 
KUMAR, ANIL 
KUMLER, KIPTON C. 
KUPPERSTEIN, ROBERT O. 
KURTZ, ARTHUR N. 
KUSIK, CHARLES L. 
LABADINI LAWRENCE 
LACHICA, VICTOR F. 
LACKNER-GRAYBIEL, JAMES R. 
LADYLIN PROPERTIES, LP. 
LAFAUCI, NICHOLAS A. 
LAHNSTEIN, RICHARD K 
LANDIS, MIMI, TR. 
LANDRY, CHRISTOPHER K 
LANE, J. FRANK 
LANG, RICHARD E. 
LANGTON, WILLIAM G., TR. 
LATHROP, SCOTT A. 
LATTIMORE, GERALDINE H. 
LAUKIEN, FRANK H. 
LAWRENCE, ADELE M. TR. 
LAWRENCE, INEZ B. 
LAWSON, JOHN R. 
LAWSON, JOHN R. 
LAWSON, JOHN R. 
LAWSON, JOHN R. 
LAY, KENNETH W. 
LAZARIDIS, LAZARUS J. 
LEACH, PRISCILLA 
LEANING, JENNIFER 
LEAPE, MARTHA P. 
LECHTENBERG, EDWARD L. 
LECLAIRE, JOHNR. 
LEE, ALAN 
LEE, BARBARA F. 
LEE, JOHN G. 
LEE, KENNETH R. 
LEE, MIKE M. 
LEE, RICHARDS. 



LOCATION 

154 CHESTNUT 
214 ASPEN 

24 OLD SUDBURY 

20 JUNIPER RIDGE 
185 LINCOLN 
TOWER 
160 TOWER 
HUNTLEY 

16 HUNTLEY 

99 CONANT 

28 BEAVER POND 
216 CONCORD 

10 OLD CONCORD 
209 LINCOLN 
38R INDIAN CAMP 
24L INDIAN CAMP 

32 BOYCE FARM 
55 OLD BEDFORD 

167 LEXINGTON 

192 CONCORD 
12 WESTON 
42 ROUND HILL 
6 GOOSE POND 

33 WINTER 

9 BAKER FARM 
148 WESTON 
2 BEDFORD 
12 SMITH 
236 ASPEN 
208 CONCORD 
SOUTH GREAT 
SOUTH GREAT 
SOUTH GREAT 
SOUTH GREAT 
23 GOOSE POND 
110 TOWER 
38L INDIAN CAMP 
113 TOWER 
12 LAUREL 
32 BYPASS 
150 TRAPELO 
296 SOUTH GREAT 
31 OLD FARM 
26 WINDINGWOOD 
117 SOUTH GREAT 
4 SMITH 
53 SOUTH GREAT 



TOTAL VALUE 

CR 233,800 

CR 278,900 

RD 437,600 

RD 404,300 

RD 505,600 

RD 305,600 

RD 584,700 

LN 27,300 

LN 351 ,700 

RD 943,100 

RD 1,023,100 

RD 372,400 

RD 669,200 

RD 323,800 

LN 110,000 

LN 130,000 

RD 528,900 

RD 11,830,300 

RD 674,900 

RD 232,100 

RD 671,800 

RD 745,700 

RD 520,800 

ST 529,200 
574,500 

RD 566,900 

RD 393,300 

HL 739,200 

CR 277,100 

RD 372,800 

RD 15,100 

RD 141,500 

RD 4,100 

RD 2,300 

RD 459,400 

RD 454,500 

LN 130,000 

RD 542,200 

DR 516,900 

RD 484,800 

RD 892,400 

RD 363,000 

RD 742,600 

LN 299,500 

RD 467,700 

HL 595,400 

RD 51 1 ,200 



201 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


LEE, SHIHYING 


11 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


467,700 


LEE, WOOK 


22D INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


110,000 


LEGATES, JOHN C. 


CANAAN 


DR 


20,100 


LEGATES, JOHN C. 


14 CANAAN 


DR 


716,300 


LEGER TRUSTEE, MARY E. 


16 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


208,700 


LEGER, DAVID C & GINA 


4 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


292,800 


LEGGAT, BARBARA B. 


81 BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


517,000 


LEIGHTON, DEBORAH S. 


60 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


357,300 


LEMANDER, WILLIAM C 


145 TRAPELO 


RD 


406,300 


LEMIRE, ROBERTA. 


86 CODMAN 


RD 


365,500 


LENICK, BARRY J. 


42A INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


86,000 


LENINGTON, ROBERT L, TR. 


31 BOYCEFARM 


RD 


495,300 


LENNON, JAMES V. 


54 TOWER 


RD 


385,600 


LENNON, STEVEN D. 


LINCOLN 


RD 


36,300 


LENNON, STEVEN D. 


100 LINCOLN 


RD 


388,700 


LEONG, JOSEPH C. 


10 GILES 


RD 


297,000 


LERMAN, ELIZABETH T. 


20 STONEHEDGE 




425,900 


LESLIE, PAUL M. 


15 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


150,300 


LEVI, THOMAS C. 


7 HILLSIDE 


RD 


301,400 


LEVIN, BETTY, TRUSTEE 


16 OLD WINTER 


ST 


431,486 


LEVINE, JONATHAN B. 


11 OLD COUNTY 


RD 


350,500 


LEVINE, MITCHELL J. 


21 BEDFORD 


LN 


636,300 


LEVY DAVID E 


38 TOWER 


RD 


412,500 


LEVY, MORRIS S. 


161 LEXINGTON 


RD 


400,600 


LEVY, RAYMOND A. 


39 WESTON 


RD 


445,300 


LEWIS, WM. DAVID 


7 OAKDALE 


LN 


598,900 


LI.MINGCHEM. 


23 OAK MEADOW 




727,800 


LI, YAO T. 


15 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


471,900 


LIBMAN, MARCIA R. 


16B NORTH COMMONS 




177,500 


LIE, HENRY 


67 BEDFORD 


RD 


619,500 


LIEM KAREL R 


10 OAKDALE 


LN 


645,000 


LIEPERT, ANTHONY G. 


108 TRAPELO 


RD 


387,100 


LIEPINS.ATISA. 


28 BOYCE FARM 


RD 


443,800 


LIEPMANN, W.HUGO 


15 GRASSHOPPER 


LN 


446,200 


LIGHT, GALEN D. JR. 


17 GILES 


RD 


271,000 


LIN, AUGUSTINE Y.C. 


15 ORCHARD 


LN 


296,100 


LINCOLN AUTOMOTIVE 


170 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


490,200 


LINCOLN HOMES CORPORATION 


1 WELLS 


RD 


5,234,900 


LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATE 


25D SOUTH COMMONS 




183,300 


LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 


OLD BEDFORD 


RD 


541 ,300 


LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 


17R SOUTH COMMONS 




233,600 


LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 


19B SOUTH COMMONS 




171,000 


LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 


19C SOUTH COMMONS 




195,700 


LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 


21 D SOUTH COMMONS 




256,700 


LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 


23C SOUTH COMMONS 




194,500 


LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 


25A SOUTH COMMONS 




171,900 


LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 


25B SOUTH COMMONS 




120,000 



202 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 

LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 

LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 

LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 

LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 

LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 

LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 

LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATES 

LINCOLN HOUSSE ASSOCIATES 

LINCOLN HSE ASSOC 

LINCOLN HSE ASSOC LP 

LINCOLN HSE ASSOC LP 

LINCOLN HSE ASSOC LP 

LINCOLN HSE ASSOC LP 

LINCOLN OLD TOWN HALL CORPORAT 

LINCOLN, ROBERTA. 

LINSTROM, PETER J. 

LINTON, JOHN R. 

LIPPMAN.ANNEF.TR. 

LIPSEY, STEVEN D. 

LISS, SIA 

LITTLE, JOHN D.C. 

LIVERMORE, ROBERT, JR. 

LO, STEVEN SHIH T. 

LOCKE, CAROL A. 

LOCKWOOD, DUNBAR, JR. 

LOEWENSTEIN, DAVIDA G. 

LONG, CATHRYN CHERNE 

LOOF, MARTIN 

LOUD, ROBERT L. 

LOVELL CAROL A 

LOVERING, TALBOT D. 

LOW, STEPHEN R. 

LUDDEN.JOHNM. 

LUFT, ANNE-DORE 

LUIJBEN, MONIQUEA. 

LUPO, ROBERT N. TR 

LUSTWERK, INGEBORG JOHANNE T. 

LUTNICKI, HARRIET H. 

LUTNICKI, HARRIET H. 

LUTNICKI, HARRIET H. 

LUTNICKI, HARRIET H. 

LUTNICKI, VICTOR A. 

LYMAN, RICHARD B., JR. 

LYONS, RICHARD K 

LYTLE, WILLIAM O. JR. 

MA, KEE MAGGIE 

MACBRIDE, MARY BIGELOW 



LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


25C SOUTH COMMONS 




175,300 


27L SOUTH COMMONS 




242,600 


27R SOUTH COMMONS 




233,400 


29A SOUTH COMMONS 




171,300 


29B SOUTH COMMONS 




120,000 


29C SOUTH COMMONS 




176,100 


29D SOUTH COMMONS 




183,700 


23B SOUTH COMMONS 




177,700 


19D SOUTH COMMONS 




224,900 


17L SOUTH COMMONS 




244,600 


21 A SOUTH COMMONS 




172,700 


21 B SOUTH COMMONS 




86,000 


21 C SOUTH COMMONS 




176,900 


25 LINCOLN 


RD 


171,200 


67 CONANT 


RD 


695,600 


27 BYPASS 


RD 


265,400 


9 OAKDALE 


LN 


648,900 


142 BEDFORD 


RD 


294,700 


121 WESTON 


RD 


676,900 


286 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


899,500 


37 CONANT 


RD 


439,200 


19 BAKER FARM 




534,200 


36 BROOKS 


RD 


257,200 


35 OLD WINTER 


ST 


357,200 


69 SILVER HILL 


RD 


524,500 


29 LONG MEADOW 


RD 


417,900 


85 LEXINGTON 


RD 


615,800 


159 BEDFORD 


RD 


258,900 


64 CONANT 


RD 


328,700 


11 BLUEBERRY 


LN 


494,500 


177 BEDFORD 


RD 


369,100 


16 BLUEBERRY 


LN 


564,400 


20 BEAVER POND 


RD 


475,000 


3 HILLSIDE 


RD 


322,000 


244 CONCORD 


RD 


332,900 


131 TOWER 


RD 


350,100 


50 PAGE 


RD 


429,800 


BEDFORD 


RD 


33,700 


BEDFORD 


RD 


35,800 


CANAAN 


DR 


4,900 


CANAAN 


DR 


25,600 


10 CANAAN 


DR 


531 ,500 


124 CHESTNUT 


CR 


252,100 


40 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


206,700 


30 LAUREL 


DR 


436,500 


42C INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


86,000 


38 TODD POND 


RD 


127,900 



203 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


MACDONALD STEWART G JR 


24 WHEELER 


RD 


1 ,639,600 


MACDOWELL ROY S JR 


OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


9,171 


MACINNIS, HAZELA. 


264 LINCOLN 


RD 


242,200 


MACKENZIE, MURDOCK J. 


80 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


310,000 


MACLAURIN, ELLEN 


55 PAGE 


RD 


548,700 


MACLEAN JOHN K 


21 FARRAR 


RD 


372,200 


MACLEAN, ALEXANDER S. 


53 WINTER 


ST 


335,200 


MACLEAN, H. ARNOLD, EST OF 


21 TRAPELO 


RD 


435,200 


MACLEOD, CAROL 


142 CHESTNUT 


CR 


231 ,800 


MACMAHON, LUCIA TODD 


120 LINCOLN 


RD 


353,300 


MACMILLAN JEANNE K 


344 HEMLOCK 


CR 


283,900 


MACNEIL RONALD L. 


247 CONCORD 


RD 


280,500 


MACNEIL, BRUCE M. 


247 LINCOLN 


RD 


421 ,600 


MACNEIL, JOHN C. 


65 OXBOW 


RD 


1,103,900 


MAFFEI THOMAS F., TR. 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


300,800 


MAFFEI, THOMAS F, TR. 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


277,800 


MAHAN, ANASTASIA W., TR. 


158 SANDY POND 


RD 


434,000 


MAHONEY, ANNE M. 


3 ORCHARD 


LN 


280,300 


MAHONEY, JOHN D. 


54 CONANT 


RD 


481 ,800 


MAHONEY, KATHLEEN C. 


3C SOUTH COMMONS 




120,000 


MAIER, EMANUEL 


11 WOODCOCK 


LN 


610,600 


MAILLET, JOSEPH L, TRUSTEE 


GARLAND 


RD 


23,800 


MAKI, MARKW. 


34A INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


100,000 


MALANOWSKI, JOHN S. 


11 OAKDALE 


LN 


515,200 


MALLOWS, MINETTE M., TR. 


325 HEMLOCK 


CR 


246,400 


MALLOY, DAVID C. 


252 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


224,000 


MALLOY, ROBERT M, JR. 


CONCORD 


RD 


152,300 


MDALONEY JR., BERNARD C. 


30 STOREY 


DR 


536,700 


MANDELKORN, RICHARD S. 


65 BEAVER POND 


RD 


565,100 


MANGINI, TIMOTHY J. 


22 OLD WINTER 


ST 


323,200 


MANNARINO, JOSEPH 


272 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


164,600 


MANOS, CHRISTOPHER G. 


1 FORESTER 


RD 


604,400 


MANSFIELD, FREDERICK L 


12 MACKINTOSH 


LN 


507,100 


MANSFIELD, JAMES S. 


55 BEAVER POND 


RD 


456,000 


MANUEL, JOHN 


22B INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


86,000 


MANZELLI, JOHN 


245 LINCOLN 


RD 


280,300 


MARANIAN, ARTHUR A. SR., TR. 


11 FOX RUN 


RD 


523,300 


MARC, KATHLEEN M. 


61 BEAVER POND 


RD 


476,400 


MARCKS, RONALD H. 


33 PAGE 


RD 


498,900 


MARCUVITZ, ANDREW 


10 FOX RUN 


RD 


596,900 


MARINO, KENNETH J. 


128 BEDFORD 


RD 


306,100 


MARONI, KEVIN J., TR. 


2 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


756,300 


MARONI, MARILYN P., TR. 


TRAPELO 


RD 


30,300 


MARSDEN, PETER V 


9 SILVER BIRCH 


LN 


272,200 


MARSH, PAUL E. 


61 BEDFORD 


RD 


752,500 


MARTIN WALTER F II 


14 GILES 


RD 


282,200 


MARTIN, ROBERT T. 


152 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


300,600 



204 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 

MARTIN, WINSLOW 

MASCARI, RITA 

MASON, ELIZABETH R. 

MASON, VIRGINIA J. 

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY 

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY 

MASTERS, JOSEPH & FAMILY, TRS 

MASTERSON.MARKR. 

MATTES, SARA A. 

MATTHEWS JUN EL 

MATTLAGE, RODGER A. 

MAURER, DAVID D. 

MAXWELL, PATRICIA B. 

MAY, DORIS HUDSON 

MAY, JAMES W., JR. 

MAYFIELD, GLOVER B. 

MCALEER, HAROLD T. 

MCCABE, ROBERT W. 

MCCANN PETER M 

MCCANN, SYLVIA H., TR. 

MCCART, ROBERT D. & ROSE MARIE 

MCCARTHY, DONALD & NANINE 

MCCARTHY, PAUL J. 

MCCARTHY, PAUL J. 

MCCARTHY, STEPHEN J. 

MCCOLL, ARCHIBALD M.S.II 

MCCONCHIE, JAMES H. 

MCCUNE, WILLIAM J 

MCCUNE, WILLIAM J. 

MCCUNE, WILLIAM J. JR. 

MCCUNE, WILLIAM J, JR. 

MCCUNE, WILLIAM J, JR. 

MCCUNE, WILLIAM J., JR. 

MCDOUGALD, RONALD J. 

MCDOUGALD, RONALD J. & KATHLEE 

MCEACHERN, MICHAEL M 

MCGEAN GEOFFREY B 

MCGINTY, ROBERT J. 

MCGOVERN.ANNAH. 

MCHUGH, JAMES F. Ill 

MCINNES, RICHARD D. 

MCINNIS, DONALD G. 

MCKEE, PATRICIA E. 

MCKELVY, DOUGLAS S., JR. 

MCKENNEY, JAMES HARVEY III 

MCKNIGHT, ELEANOR J. 

MCKNIGHT, ELEANOR J. 



LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


342 HEMLOCK 


CR 


225,200 


29 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


417,800 


289 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


318,200 


9 STONEHEDGE 




408,200 


72 OLD BEDFORD 


RD 


294,800 


83 VIRGINIA 


RD 


257,700 


2 OAK MEADOW 




590,700 


35 GOOSE POND 


RD 


563,000 


71 CONANT 


RD 


679,400 


35 GREENRIDGE 


LN 


217,500 


184 CONCORD 


RD 


340,900 


10 BEDFORD 


LN 


226,700 


39 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


314,200 


363 HEMLOCK 


CR 


274,500 


35 SANDY POND 


RD 


845,300 


15 WINTER 


ST 


546,200 


82 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


592,700 


96 CONCORD 


RD 


231,000 


7 WINCHELSEA 


LN 


665,400 


50 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


353,200 


26 LEWIS 


ST 


342,700 


34 BROOKS 


RD 


418,800 


UPLAND FIELD 


RD 


123,100 


9 UPLAND FIELD 


RD 


482,600 


43 ROUND HILL 


RD 


561,600 


99 WINTER 


ST 


339,300 


15 TODD POND 


RD 


553,300 


9 JUNIPER RIDGE 


RD 


275,900 


228 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


732,800 


OLD CONCORD 


RD 


3,200 


OLD CONCORD 


RD 


46,200 


14 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


354,600 


262 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


439,400 


22 LINCOLN 


RD 


597,400 


BEAVER POND 


RD 


28,300 


155 TOWER 


RD 


500,900 


13L SOUTH COMMONS 




222,500 


2 BLUEBERRY 


LN 


526,800 


23 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


344,700 


6 STONEHEDGE 




472,300 


14 FOX RUN 


RD 


487,700 


5 TABOR HILL 


RD 


449,800 


36 LINCOLN 


RD 


323,200 


9 BEDFORD 


LN 


318,300 


22 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


385,600 


339 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


264,800 


341 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


270.500 



205 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


MCKNIGHT, ERNEST T., EXECUTOR 


335 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


274,000 


MCLAUGHLIN, JAMES M. 


CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


5,300 


MCLAUGHLIN, JAMES M. 


CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


600 


MCLAUGHLIN, PETER 


320 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


185,100 


MCMORROW, MAUREEN C. 


58 TRAPELO 


RD 


739,700 


MCMORROW, RICHARD H JR & III 


64 TRAPELO 


RD 


366,200 


MCNAMARA, JOHN 


31 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


299,800 


MCNERNYMARYE 


4 HILLSIDE 


RD 


318,900 


MEADE, WARREN E. 


30 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


486,200 


MEADORS, JAMES M. 


72 BEAVER POND 


RD 


481,700 


MECSAS, MICHAEL E. 


220 SANDY POND 


RD 


491,500 


MEEKS, M. LITTLETON 


12 STONEHEDGE 




453,500 


MELANSON, LEONARD J. 


1 CEDAR 


RD 


213,100 


MELDE, PAUL F. 


11A SOUTH COMMONS 




183,500 


MELE MICHAEL 


22 BLACK BURNIAN 


RD 


736,500 


MELLEN, M. SCOTT 


2 LINWAY 


RD 


22,300 


MENKIS, JONATHAN 


62 BEAVER POND 


RD 


449,500 


MERETZKY, STEVEN E. 


41 BROOKS 


RD 


447,600 


MERIAM, ELLIN FULLER 


15 HUNTLEY 


LN 


284,400 


MERRILL, VINCENT N. 


141 OLD COUNTY 


RD 


340,900 


MERULLO, ANTHONY D. 


27 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


268,700 


MESSINA, ELENA C. 


41 STONEHEDGE 




559,600 


MEYER, EUGENE B. 


31 TRAPELO 


RD 


1 ,491 ,400 


MEYER, WILLIAM E. 


173 BEDFORD 


RD 


400,900 


MEYERS, RICHARD C. 


20L INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


230,700 


MEYERSON JOELW 


102 TODD POND 


RD 


584,500 


MICHEL, THOMAS M 


66 BEAVER POND 


RD 


656,600 


MICHENER, SUSANAH H. 


117 TOWER 


RD 


337,900 


MIDDLETON, NEIL B. 


45 WESTON 


RD 


468,000 


MIKROPOULOS, HARILAOS & GLYKER 


313 HEMLOCK 


CR 


276,900 


MIKROPOULOS, TR. HARILAOS E. 


211 ASPEN 


CR 


207,600 


MILAN, DONALD B. 


152 CHESTNUT 


CR 


204,700 


MILDER, LARRY I. 


35 BYPASS 


RD 


116,300 


MILENDER, SUMNER N. 


48 STONEHEDGE 




469,100 


MILLARD JR, DONALD A. 


6 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


510,100 


MILLARD, DONALD A, EST. 


26 TABOR HILL 


RD 


701,400 


MILLER ANNS. 


9C SOUTH COMMONS 




174,800 


MILLER, ARTHUR R. 


65 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


1,117,500 


MILLER, HAROLD T. 


1 HAWTHORNE 


CR 


563,800 


MILLER, KEITH W. 


15 BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


604,800 


MILLER, STEPHEN A. 


107 OLD COUNTY 


RD 


537,000 


MINNICK. MARTHA E. 


16 OLD CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


237,900 


MINTZ. NORBETT L 


230 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


498,400 


MINUTEMAN TECHNICAL VHS 


16 MILL 


ST 


373,200 


MIXON, SCOTT I. 


6 ACORN 


LN 


317,900 


MOHN, SUSAN W. 


10A NORTH COMMONS 




120,000 


MOHR, JOHN J. 


100 TOWER 


RD 


764,000 



206 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 

MOLLER, CYNTHIA 

MOLLICA, RICHARD F. 

MOLONEY, LAURENCE 

MONTGOMERY, JILL O. 

MONTGOMERY, MAURICE R., JR. 

MOORE, MURVALE H., JR., TR. 

MOORE, ROBERT L 

MORAN, DAVID R. 

MOREY, RUTH I. 

MORGAN, EDWARD H. 

MORGAN, ELLEN S. 

MORGAN, HENRY M, TR. 

MORGAN, HENRY M., TR. 

MORGAN, ROBERT 

MORGANTI, VICTOR M. 

MORITZ, KATHY LEE AND MICHAEL 

MORITZ, KATHY LEE AND MICHAEL 

MORITZ, KATHY LEE AND MICHAEL 

MORITZ, KATHY LEE AND MICHAEL 

MORRIS, KATHERINE C. 

MORRISSEY, J. NEIL 

MORRISSEY, J. NEIL 

MORSE, MERNAE. 

MORSE, THOMAS R. 

MORSE, THOMAS R. 

MORSE, WILLIAM H. 

MORSE, WILLIAM H. 

MORSS, CHARLES A, JR. 

MOSES, JOHN M. 

MOSHER, DAVID B. 

MOSHER, DAVID B. 

MOSHER, DAVID B., TR. 

MOSHER, DAVID B., TR. 

MOSHER, DAVID B., TR. 

MOSHER, DAVID B..TR. 

MOSS SILKE V 

MOSS, ELIZABETH T. 

MOSS, KAREN M. 

MOSS, LEONARD G. 

MOSS, PHILIP N. 

MOSS, SIDNEY 

MOSTUE, BROOKS A. 

MOU, YUNG-AN 

MOUNT, WAYNE D. 

MOZZI, ROBERT L. 

MRAKOVICH, DAVID V. 

MRUGALA, ANTHONY J. 



LOCATION 

177 CONCORD 
8 HILLSIDE 
12 BYPASS 
9A SOUTH COMMONS 

139 SOUTH GREAT 
11 HIDDENWOOD 
30 GOOSE POND 

37 FARRAR 

140 LINCOLN 
174 CONCORD 

58 TOWER 
OLD CONCORD 
237 OLD CONCORD 
263 CONCORD 
101 LEXINGTON 
133 LEXINGTON 
135 LEXINGTON 
137 LEXINGTON 
137A LEXINGTON 

24 BLUEBERRY 
23 CAMBRIDGE 
23 CAMBRIDGE 

25 BIRCHWOOD 

OLD CONCORD 
219 OLD CONCORD 
112 CODMAN 
246 SOUTH GREAT 
11 BIRCHWOOD 

4 STOREY 

SILVER HILL 

38 SILVER HILL 
SILVER HILL 
SILVER HILL 
SILVER HILL 
SILVER HILL 

128 LINCOLN 
84 DAVISON 
29 BIRCHWOOD 
14 WOODCOCK 

123 WESTON 
LINCOLN 
53 BEDFORD 

133 CHESTNUT 

123 TOWER 
79 AUTUMN 

26 BYPASS 

70 CAMBRIDGE 



TOTAL VALUE 

RD 247,300 

RD 396,100 

RD 502,000 
171,300 

RD 274,500 

PT 346,000 

RD 591,000 

RD 428,800 

RD 218,600 

RD 359,700 

RD 430,400 

RD 9,000 

RD 851,000 

RD 481 ,800 

RD 618,900 

RD 275,600 

RD 719,300 

RD 220,500 

RD 226,700 

LN 268,200 

TP 276,400 

TP 7,500 

LN 339,500 

RD 12,600 

RD 559,700 

RD 442,500 

RD 287,800 

LN 313,600 

DR 657,700 

RD 131,500 

RD 843,700 

RD 3,100 

RD 31,900 

RD 26,200 

RD 30,000 

RD 385,600 

DR 789,600 

LN 302,100 

LN 481,700 

RD 519,600 

RD 22,100 

RD 535,400 

CR 243,700 

RD 470,200 

LN 381 ,600 

RD 345,200 

TP 31,900 



207 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


MRUGALA, ANTHONY J. 


72 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


242,900 


MUELLER, ROBERT K., TR. 


12 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


528,800 


MULCAHY, DOUGLAS J. 


29 FARRAR 


RD 


377,900 


MULKEEN, MARY ELISABETH 


19 BYPASS 


RD 


266,700 


MULLIGAN, RICHARD C. 


2 SANDY POND 


RD 


541 ,400 


MUNDT, KEVIN A. 


215 SANDY POND 


RD 


818,300 


MUNROE, WILLIAM O, JR. 


9 SANDY POND 


RD 


478,300 


MURPHY JR., WILLIAM J. 


OXBOW 


RD 


2,200 


MURPHY, BARTHOLOMEW D. 


39 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


255,200 


MURPHY, MARGUERITTE S. 


257 CONCORD 


RD 


583,100 


MURPHY, PATRICK J. 


4 OAK KNOLL 


RD 


239,400 


MURPHY, RUTH M. 


191 CONCORD 


RD 


543,700 


MUSCOLO, GABRIELLA 


27 BEDFORD 


LN 


447,600 


MUTSCHLER, LOUIS H. 


23 BOYCE FARM 


RD 


535,500 


MYERS, LUCY B., TR. 


198 CONCORD 


RD 


254,800 


MYGATT, SAMUEL G. 


37 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


594,300 


MYLES, THERESA ANNE 


152 SANDY POND 


RD 


446,000 


NABIH, ISMAIL 


95 TOWER 


RD 


485,000 


NAGY, JOHN 


3 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


326,400 


NAIMAN, ALARIC 


14 HUNTLEY 


LN 


264,500 


NAIMAN.MARKL 


1 MOCCASIN 


HL 


356,500 


NAJARIAN, K. GEORGE 


11 LAUREL 


DR 


756,300 


NAJJAR, EDWARD G. 


30 GARLAND 


RD 


993,300 


NAPIER SYLVIA FITTS 


40 WESTON 


RD 


505,700 


NAPIER, SYLVIA FITTS 


WESTON 


RD 


320,200 


NARAYAN, RAMESH 


22 OAK MEADOW 




540,100 


NARDI, EDWARD G. 


37 BEDFORD 


RD 


403,100 


NARDONE, NANCY E. 


19 GOOSE POND 


RD 


568,800 


NASTUKRUTHA.L. 


232 ASPEN 


CR 


240,200 


NATHANIEL, ROBERT 


10 CERULEAN 


WY 


1 ,253,200 


NAWOICHIK, ELSIE I. ADMIN 


34 GOOSE POND 


RD 


516,400 


NEALE, MARY B. 


5B SOUTH COMMONS 




86,000 


NEILEY, ALEXANDER H. 


WINTER 


ST 


18,800 


NEILEY, ALEXANDER H. 


74 WINTER 


ST 


454,200 


NEISTER, JOHN 


41 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


556,900 


NELSON, ALBERT E. 


14 BEAVER POND 


RD 


386,400 


NENNEMAN, RICHARD A. 


314 HEMLOCK 


CR 


239,200 


NERI, JOHN P. 


109 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


209,800 


NESSEN, E. RICHARD 


12 GRANVILLE 


RD 


468,500 


NESTO, BRUNO R. 


SANDY POND 


RD 


27,000 


NEUHAUS EDMUND 


285 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


226,500 


NEURATH, PAUL 


33 FARRAR 


RD 


329,500 


NEWBOLD, THOMAS 


58 TODD POND 


RD 


153,900 


NEWBURGER, BABETTE B., TR. 


76 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


348,900 


NEWCOMBE, CHARLES A. 


17 FARRAR 


RD 


500,200 


NEWMAN, MARY SHAW 


23 WHEELER 


RD 


1,128,400 


NEWTON, GEORGE C, JR. 


264 CONCORD 


RD 


429,400 



208 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


NICHOLS, ANTHONY R. 


22R INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


130,000 


NICHOLS, RICHARD K. 


51 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


293,900 


NICHOLSON, KATHRYN M. 


14 MEADOWDAM 


RD 


594,700 


NICKERSON, BRUCE H. 


275 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


256,400 


NICKERSON, ELIZABETH PERKINS 


3 LEXINGTON 


RD 


570,700 


NIEDERMEYER BERNARD E III TR 


232 TOWER 


RD 


872,200 


NIELSEN, DAVID V. 


136 WESTON 


RD 


434,500 


NILES, JOHN PAUL 


3 UNDERWOOD 


CR 


403,900 


NILES, ROBERT L 


23 BLUEBERRY 


LN 


402,300 


NOCKLES, WILLIAM A. 


11 HILLSIDE 


RD 


301 ,300 


NOPAKUN, SUVITYA 


12 DEER RUN 


RD 


563,700 


NORRIS, LINDSAY 


158 BEDFORD 


RD 


233,300 


NORTON C ROBIN M 


11 GREENRIDGE 


LN 


217,700 


NOSS, GEORGE M. 


312 HEMLOCK 


CR 


209,900 


NOTKIN, LEONARD 


30 WINDINGWOOD 


LN 


408,600 


NUGENT, JAMES G. 


299 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


205,700 


OAK, INGUL IVAN 


20 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


369,500 


O'BRIEN JUDITH A 


34D INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


167,500 


OBRIEN, DANIEL F. 


27 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


135,400 


OBRIEN, DANIEL F. 


29 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


222,500 


OBRIEN. JOHN J., TR. 


76 DAVISON 


DR 


407,300 


OBRIEN, JOSEPH A. 


4 LINWAY 


RD 


342,200 


OBRIEN, MICHAEL T. 


163 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


321 ,600 


OCONNOR, DANIEL F. 


74 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


216,900 


OCONNOR, JOHNT. 


67 LINCOLN 


RD 


530,400 


O'CONNOR, MARY E. 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


228,400 


O'CONOR KRISTINA R 


25 ROUND HILL 


RD 


654,300 


OHL, IRINA 


4 RIDGE 


RD 


117,400 


OHL, JOHNW. 


4 MEADOWBROOK 


RD 


393,100 


OLIVIERI, JAMES 


152 LEXINGTON . 


RD 


279,400 


OLOUGHLIN, JOHNM. 


37 LONG MEADOW 


RD 


418,400 


OLSEN, KENNETH H. 


2 WESTON 


RD 


897,400 


OLSHANSKY, KENNETH J. 


124 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


364,600 


OMANSKY, LEON M. 


WARBLER SPRINGS 


RD 


6,000 


OMANSKY, LEON M. 


14 WARBLER SPRINGS 


RD 


683,000 


ONEIL, DAVID 


4 MOCCASIN 


HL 


509,200 


ONEILL, PHILIP D, JR. 


11 BLACK BURNIAN 


RD 


690,300 


ONIGMAN, MARC P 


94 CODMAN 


RD 


302,500 


OROURKE, KEVIN E. 


53 LINCOLN 


RD 


446,400 


OROURKE, PAULC. 


101 LINCOLN 


RD 


846,900 


ORR, RONALD B. 


172 BEDFORD 


RD 


542,800 


OSBORNE, GORDON 


PAGE FARM 


RD 


37,000 


OSBORNE, GORDON 


PAGE FARM 


RD 


32,300 


OSBORNE, GORDON 


PAGE FARM 


RD 


23,900 


OSBORNE, GORDON 


18 PAGE FARM 


RD 


532,600 


OSBORNE, GORDON 


TRAPELO 


RD 


44,300 


OUTTEN, HENRY P. 


3 TOWER 


RD 


434,700 



209 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1, 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


OWEN, CHAS./P. MACALONEY 


28 HILLSIDE 


RD 


270,400 


OWEN, R. CALVIN 


166 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


306,200 


PABOOJIAN-HAGOPIAN, HELEN 


5 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


286,200 


PADDOCK, ANN E. 


2 RIDGE 


RD 


113,300 


PADDOCK, ILGA B. 


60 TOWER 


RD 


677,900 


PAGANO ROBERT P 


140 CONCORD 


RD 


528,100 


PAGE JR., WALTER H. 


58 SANDY POND 


RD 


578,200 


PAGE, LOT B. 


109 CONANT 


RD 


540,800 


PAGE, STANLEY. W. 


149 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


297,100 


PAGLIERANI, LAWRENCE A.(PAIGE) 


16 PINE RIDGE 


RD 


384,000 


PAIK, SUNGIK FRANCIS 


16 MINEBROOK 


RD 


641 ,600 


PAINE, ROBERT G, JR. 


351 HEMLOCK 


CR 


214,800 


PALMER, ATTELIO A. TR 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


262,500 


PALMER, GERALD D. 


247 TOWER 


RD 


534,900 


PANETTA, FRANK 


279 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


192,200 


PANETTA, FRANKS JAMES 


LEXINGTON 


RD 


23,900 


PANETTA. FRANK J., JR. TRUSTEE 


109 PAGE 


RD 


556,700 


PANETTA, JAMES J. 


274 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


173,000 


PANETTA, RITA I. 


99 PAGE 


RD 


235,600 


PANETTA, THERESA J., TRUSTEE 


283 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


281 ,300 


PANTAZELOS, PETER G. 


12 WOODCOCK 


LN 


828,000 


PARISI, PAULA. 


12 WHEELER 


RD 


701 ,500 


PARKE IV, NATHAN G. 


111 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


627,800 


PARKE, NATHAN G. IV 


SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


13,800 


PARKER, JACKSON B. 


21 HILLSIDE 


RD 


339,100 


PARLAJOHNJ 


174 TOWER 


RD 


662,200 


PARLA.JOHN J 


176 TOWER 


RD 


203,700 


PARMENTIER, JAMES L 


175 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


310,300 


PARSONS, DAVID W. 


36 WINDINGWOOD 


LN 


349,200 


PARTOVI FIROOZ 


23 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


347,700 


PASTORIZA, RUTH B. 


40 CONANT 


RD 


524,000 


PAUL CHRISTOPHER 


121 TRAPELO 


RD 


366,700 


PAYNE, H. MORSE 


245 ASPEN 


CR 


214,200 


PAYNE, ROGER S. 


WESTON 


RD 


9,700 


PAYNE, ROGER S. 


191 WESTON 


RD 


601 ,700 


PAYNE, WILLIAM T. 


TOWER 


RD 


310,600 


PAYNE, WILLIAM T. 


116 TOWER 


RD 


442,500 


PEARLMAN, ROBERT 


102 LINCOLN 


RD 


428,000 


PEARMAIN, CLAIRE P. 


CONCORD 


RD 


46,300 


PEARMAIN, CLAIRE P. 


CONCORD 


RD 


1 1 ,200 


PEARMAIN, CLAIRE P. 


217 CONCORD 


RD 


464,700 


PEARMAIN, W.ROBERT 


WINTER 


ST 


12,100 


PEAVY, LEOPOLD JR. 


33 TABOR HILL 


RD 


621 ,200 


PEERY, ASHTON 


50 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


639,800 


PEJCHAR, JAN 


40 LAUREL 


DR 


370,400 


PELTZ, LAWRENCE 


10 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


363,700 


PERERA, GUIDOR, JR. 


OLD CONCORD 


RD 


26,000 



210 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 

PERERA, GUIDOR., JR. 

PERERA, GUIDOR., JR. 

PERKINS, SIMON 

PERLMAN, SAMUELS. 

PERLMUTTER, STEVEN P. 

PERRY, JOHN CURTIS 

PERRY, JOHN R. 

PERRY, JUDITHS. 

PETERSON, MARY E. 

PETERSON, MARY E. 

PETERSON, MARY E. 

PETTIGREW O BRIAN 

PHALON, SUSAN E. 

PHELPS, ROBERT H, TR. 

PHELPS-BRAUN, DIANE K. 

PHILLIPPS, PATRICK 

PHILLIPPS, PATRICK 

PHILLIPS, CHARLOTTE 

PHILLIPS, CHARLOTTE T. 

PHO, JOHNNY C. 

PHO, JOHNNY C. 

PIANKA, WALTER EDWARD 

PICKER, DENNIS 

PICKETT, ROBERTO 

PICKETT, ROBERT C, TR. 

PICKMAN, ANTHONY 

PICKMAN, ANTHONY 

PICKMAN, ANTHONY 

PICKMAN, ANTHONY 

PICKMAN, ANTHONY 

PICKMAN, ANTHONY 

PIERSON, MARIE MARTHA HANAFIN 

PIKE, BERTRAM N. 

PIKE, JOHN A. 

PINE LOCH REALTY TRUST 

PINGEON, HENDONC. 

PINGEON, JAMES R. 

PINO, FRANK J. 

PINO, FRANK J 

PINTO, ROBERT W. 

PISCATAWAY REALTY TRUST 

PITKIN, BONNY YUKI 

PLOUFFE, FRANCIS A. 

PLUKAS, JOHN M. 

POLAROID CORPORATION 

POLINO, ROSAMARIA 

PONN, NANCY 



LOCATION 

OLD CONCORD 
121 OLD CONCORD 
28L INDIAN CAMP 

31 ROUND HILL 

90 TODD POND 

29 LINCOLN 
224 ASPEN 

97 LINCOLN 

17 MEADOWBROOK 

20 MEADOWBROOK 
159 SOUTH GREAT 

60 MILL 
32A INDIAN CAMP 

28 LONG MEADOW 

16 TRAPELO 
OLD COUNTY ROAD E 
224 OLD COUNTY ROAD 
OLD COUNTY 

27 TABOR HILL 

15 GREENRIDGE 

22 GREENRIDGE 
103 SOUTH GREAT 
142 SANDY POND 

70 BIRCHWOOD 

12 LONG MEADOW 

CONCORD 

CONCORD 

213 CONCORD 

4 SWEET BAY 

8 SWEET BAY 
10 SWEET BAY 
25 MORNINGSIDE 
52 BIRCHWOOD 
20 CONANT 

CONCORD 

9 BAKER BRIDGE 
221 LINCOLN 

24 CAMBRIDGE 
CAMBRIDGE 

23 GREENRIDGE 
PAGE 

26A INDIAN CAMP 
177 LINCOLN 

20 HUCKLEBERRY 
OLD COUNTY ROAD E 
44L INDIAN CAMP 

64 DAVISON 





TOTAL VALUE 


RD 


12,500 


RD 


679,100 


LN 


130,000 


RD 


1 ,273,800 


RD 


567,500 


RD 


580,000 


CR 


251,600 


RD 


627,000 


RD 


199,800 


RD 


208,500 


RD 


281,800 


ST 


808,400 


LN 


150,400 


RD 


360,200 


RD 


531,100 


EX 


27,500 


EX 


622,900 


RD 


42,500 


RD 


888,700 


LN 


216,600 


LN 


218,100 


RD 


441,300 


RD 


346,600 


LN 


304,100 


RD 


497,200 


RD 


151,300 


RD 


131,900 


RD 


686,200 


LN 


350,600 


LN 


273,600 


LN 


409,300 


LN 


265,000 


LN 


384,200 


RD 


765,500 


RD 


26,300 


RD 


634,100 


RD 


253,700 


TP 


154,800 


TP 


58,500 


LN 


210.300 


RD 


29,700 


LN 


86,000 


RD 


398,200 


HL 


607,700 


EX 


28,000 


LN 


110,000 


DR 


714,600 



211 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


POTTER, RUTH F. 


93 TOWER 


RD 


475,600 


POULOS, CHARLES L 


17 BYPASS 


RD 


252,300 


POULOS, CHARLES L 


10 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


305,500 


POWERS, FRANCIS L, JR. 


331 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


265,000 


POWERS, MARTIN J. 


133 LINCOLN 


RD 


333,400 


PRESTON, KATHARINE M. 


33 LINCOLN 


RD 


482,500 


PRITCHETT JOHN 


136 TOWER 


RD 


554,400 


PRIVITERA, SALVATORE S., TR. 


15 GOOSE POND 


RD 


606,000 


PROTOPAPA, SEJFI 


2 LEWIS 


ST 


447,800 


PRUITT, STEPHEN L. 


86 TOWER 


RD 


292,100 


PRUSSING, CARL 


FOX RUN 


RD 


1,000 


PUFFER, RICHARD F, JR. 


10 CONANT 


RD 


524,300 


PUGH, ALEXANDER L, III 


49 BEDFORD 


RD 


442,300 


QUADRI, MICHAEL ARLEN 


259 CONCORD 


RD 


314,500 


QUAN, MARY 


6A NORTH COMMONS 




86,000 


QUAYLE, DWIGHTW. 


8 MEADOWBROOK 


RD 


562,900 


QUELCH, JOHN A. 


57 BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


859,900 


QUINN JOHN J 


19 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


278,500 


R.D MCCARTINC 


110 CONCORD 


RD 


322,100 


RAAG, VALVO 


TOWER 


RD 


250,700 


RAAG, VALVO 


167 TOWER 


RD 


503,400 


RABINOWITZ, SAMUEL J. 


26 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


392,400 


RACIOPPI, ROBERTA. 


8C NORTH COMMONS 




159,400 


RAGAN RALPH R 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


271 ,900 


RAGGIO, GABRIEL 


7 TOWER 


RD 


295,500 


RAGO-MCNAMARA, JULIET 


52 TODD POND 


RD 


152,800 


RAJA ELLEN A TR OF THE E.A. 


40 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


336,600 


RAKAUSKAS, PETER F. 


3B SOUTH COMMONS 




161,700 


RANDO, THOMAS J. 


67 WINTER 


ST 


468,100 


RAPPAPORT, JEROME & PHYLLIS 


66 DAVISON 


DR 


277,600 


RAPPAPORT, JEROME L 


70 DAVISON 


DR 


804,500 


RAPPERPORT, EUGENE JOHN 


209 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


412,700 


RAPPOLI, ARTHUR E. 


180 BEDFORD 


RD 


279,800 


RAWSON NANCY B TRUSTEE 


8 MOCCASIN 


HL 


426,100 


RAY, RUTH V., TR. 


214 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


459,600 


RAYSIRCAR, PARTHO 


1 SWEET BAY 


LN 


670,600 


READY, JOHN E. 


5 SMITH 


HL 


606,800 


REALS, JOAN E. 


17 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


806,600 


REAM, WILLIAM L 


21 STONEHEDGE 




51 1 ,300 


REDMOND, ROSEMARY KEOUGH 


29 BOYCE FARM 


RD 


433,900 


REDPATH, NANCY S.M. 


123 LINCOLN 


RD 


573,500 


REECE RICHARD C TR 


105 TRAPELO 


RD 


437,900 


REED, PATRICIA R. 


59 OXBOW 


RD 


322,900 


REGAZZI, ROBERT M. 


OXBOW 


RD 


200 


REIDER.W. JAMES, TR. 


64 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


352,100 


REIMAN, PATRICIA W. 


221 ASPEN 


CR 


272,300 


REINHERZ, ELLIS 


113 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


519,000 



212 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1, 1996 



OWNER NAME 

REISER, GEORGE 

REISER, GEORGE P. 

REISER, PAMELAB.TR. 

RELMAN, HARRIET V. 

REPKO, BRUCE 

RESNICK, CHARLES H. 

RESTUCCHIA, MICHAEL J. 

REVIS, KENNETH J. 

RHINES, MICHAEL E. 

RICCI, RUSSELL J. 

RICCI, RUSSELL J. 

RICE, CLIFTON V. 

RICE, DAVID B. 

RICE, JAMES F. JR. 

RICE, JOHN T. 

RICE, PAULG. 

RICHARDS, RUTH L. 

RICHARDSON, FREDERICK C. 

RIES, DAVID P. 

RIGOTTI NANCY A 

RISCH, MARTIN D., TRUSTEE 

RISLEY, CHRISTOPHER 

RISLEY, CHRISTOPHER 

RISLEY, CURTIS A. 

RISSER. THOMAS A 

RITCHIE, JAMES R 

RITSHER, CYNTHIA W 

RIZZO, JANEL. 

ROBBAT, JOSEPH 

ROBBAT, JOSEPH JR. 

ROBBINS, DEBORAH ANNE 

ROBBINS, ESTATE OF ROLAND W. 

ROBERGE, JAMES K 

ROBERTS, VICTOR F. 

ROBINSON, JOHN G. 

ROBSON, EDWIN A. Ill 

ROCKLAGE, SCOTT MICHAEL 

RODMAN. PAULN. 

ROEHRMARCIAA 

ROEHR.MARCIA 

ROGERS, ALFRED P. 

ROGERS, BEN F , TR. 

ROGERS, CHRISTOPHER B. 

ROGERS, HARRIET J. AND JOSEPH 

ROJAS, DANIEL C. 

ROLFE, EDWARD 

ROLLINS, JAMES L JR. TRUSTEE 



LOCATION 

70 TRAPELO 
81 WESTON 

TRAPELO 
23 OLD FARM 

2 ORCHARD 
98 TODD POND 

284 SOUTH GREAT 
5 STONEHEDGE 
129 CONCORD 

16 OLD SUDBURY 
SOUTH GREAT 
7 TWIN POND 

158 SOUTH GREAT 

51 WINTER 

31 RED RAIL FARM 
154 SOUTH GREAT 

17 BEDFORD 
259 LINCOLN 

34 OLD WINTER 
254 CONCORD 

71 WINTER 
TOWER 

103 TOWER 
21 OLD CONCORD 
70 TODD POND 
274 CONCORD 
251 LINCOLN 
38 SANDY POND 
OLD CONCORD 
151 OLD CONCORD 
5 BIRCHWOOD 

18 OLD CAMBRIDGE 
111 LEXINGTON 

46D INDIAN CAMP 

76 TRAPELO 
40R INDIAN CAMP 
179 SANDY POND 

3 WHEELER 
43 TODD POND 

110 OLD CONCORD 

3 PAGE FARM 

4 GRANVILLE 
15 MACKINTOSH 

19 BROOKS 

15C SOUTH COMMONS 

11 SILVER BIRCH 
218 CONCORD 



TOTAL VALUE 

RD 740,100 

RD 839,700 

RD 306,100 

RD 521,400 

LN 279,900 

RD 573,200 

RD 752,400 

513,200 

RD 325,400 

RD 578,800 

RD 36,900 

LN 500,500 

RD 317,400 

ST 31 1 ,300 

303,700 

RD 421,700 

LN 278,500 

RD 394,800 

ST 432,500 

RD 289,400 

ST 389,100 

RD 23,200 

RD 1.051,600 

RD 409,100 

RD 1,004,500 

RD 298,100 

RD 300.700 

RD 523,400 

RD 3,600 

RD 1.008,100 

LN 279,100 

TP 232,300 

RD 850,300 

LN 130,000 

RD 731,800 

LN 130,000 

RD 879,400 

RD 1,039,600 

RD 152,200 

RD 679,800 

RD 463,500 

RD 502,300 

LN 484,900 

RD 343,900 

194,100 

LN 318,300 

RD 468,600 



213 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


ROSE, JAMES 


248 LINCOLN 


RD 


320,200 


ROSE, STUART M. 


26 STONEHEDGE 




463,600 


ROSEN, JOSEPH 


136 CHESTNUT 


CR 


1 99,400 


ROSENBERG, CARLS. 


34 ROUND HILL 


RD 


613,700 


ROSENBLATT MICHAEL S 


334 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


827,100 


ROSENBLATT, MAX S. 


26 GARLAND 


RD 


1,185,500 


ROSS, PAUL F. 


8 TODD POND 


RD 


554,400 


ROSS, ROBERT H. 


327 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


242,000 


ROSSITER, W. ALLEN 


134 SANDY POND 


RD 


448,500 


ROSSONI, PAOLA M. 


25 BAKER FARM 




504,700 


ROSSONI, PAOLA M. 


33 TODD POND 


RD 


124,200 


ROSSONI, PETER AND PHILIP CAN 


BAKER FARM 




20,100 


ROSSONI, PETER, PHILIP, LUCIA 


BAKER FARM 




175,800 


ROTE, ANN CHATHAM 


78 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


410,500 


ROTH, LISA F. 


1 OAK MEADOW 




531 ,000 


ROTHSTEIN, PETER H. 


31 GREENRIDGE 


LN 


224,100 


ROW, RONALD V. 


145 TOWER 


RD 


614,200 


RUDNICK, MITCHELL 


24 OAK MEADOW 




594,700 


RUGO, HENRY J. 


24 CONANT 


RD 


598,200 


RURAL LAND FOUNDATION OF UNCO 


145 LINCOLN 


RD 


2,782,100 


RUSS, CLIVEJ. 


114 CHESTNUT 


CR 


251 ,800 


RUSSELL, MARJORIE E. 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


234,300 


RUSSELL, MICHAEL D. 


16 JUNIPER RIDGE 


RD 


295,400 


RUSSELL, MILES C 


96 LEXINGTON 


RD 


645,100 


RUSSELL, WILLIAM B. 


24 BEDFORD 


RD 


1 ,046,200 


RYAN, ALICE 


89 TOWER 


RD 


281 ,400 


RYAN, ALICE E. 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


218,600 


RYAN, ALICE E. 


83 TOWER 


RD 


459,700 


RYAN, HELEN 


79 TOWER 


RD 


408,400 


RYAN, MARJORIE, HINES, TR. 


54 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


361 ,800 


RYAN, WILLIAM F. 


338 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


418,900 


SABBAG, EVALINAJ.TR. 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


130,000 


SACERDOTE, LUCIANA 


36 TODD POND 


RD 


166.600 


SACHS, GARY S. 


10 GARLAND 


RD 


1,131,200 


SACHS, REYNOLD M. 


18 OLD WINTER 


ST 


698,700 


SACKNOFF, ERIC J. 


52 SANDY POND 


RD 


802,900 


SAKOWICH, STEPHEN J. 


99 TOWER 


RD 


402,200 


SALEM, DEEB N. 


80 DAVISON 


DR 


671 ,200 


SALMON, MARJORIE B. 


64 WINTER 


ST 


571,100 


SALVINI, DAVID K., JR. 


137 TRAPELO 


RD 


431 ,200 


SALVUCCI, FORTUNATO 


7 FORESTER 


RD 


73,700 


SAMARAS, ELIAS 


53 STONEHEDGE 




889,600 


SAMARJIAN, GREGORY L, TR. 


50 BYPASS 


RD 


371 ,000 


SAMPSON, GISELER. 


5A SOUTH COMMONS 




174,200 


SANDERSON, IAN C. 


127 LINCOLN 


RD 


687,900 


SANDS, MARY M. 


354 HEMLOCK 


CR 


328,100 


SANTA, CECELIA F. 


7 ORCHARD 


LN 


298,600 



214 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


SARTORI, RUTH M. 


BYPASS 


RD 


212,900 


SARTORI.RUTHM. 


16 BYPASS 


RD 


406,400 


SATTERFIELD, ANNE P., TR. 


38 TABOR HILL 


RD 


493,400 


SAVAGE. WILLIAM G. 


26 LINCOLN 


RD 


431,700 


SAX JULIA 


9 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


626,600 


SCHEFF, ANDREW 


100 CONCORD 


RD 


269,000 


SCHEFF, BENSON H. 


CONCORD 


RD 


176,800 


SCHEFF, BENSON H. 


161 CONCORD 


RD 


364,200 


SCHEFT, WILLIAM A. 


125 CHESTNUT 


CR 


256,400 


SCHILDBACH, MURIEL 


34 TODD POND 


RD 


100,700 


SCHILLER, JOAN ARENTZEN 


47 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


350,400 


SCHLESINGER. LEONARD A. 


20 GARLAND 


RD 


1,187,500 


SCHLIEMANN, PETER C. 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


133,900 


SCHUEMANN, PETER C. 


50 SILVER HILL 


RD 


806,900 


SCHMERTZLER, MARGARETTA B. 


135 TRAPELO 


RD 


463,200 


SCHMID, WILFRIED 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


29,300 


SCHMID, WILFRIED 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


300,000 


SCHMID. WILFRIED 


21 SILVER HILL 


RD 


678,600 


SCHUDY, ROBERT B. 


30 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


159,500 


SCHULLER. EDWARD W. 


131 LINCOLN 


RD 


392,700 


SCHULTE, ROBERT D 


18 OAK MEADOW 




590,700 


SCHULTZ, CHARLES 


6B NORTH COMMONS 




162,000 


SCHWANN, WILLIAM 


26 OLD WINTER 


ST 


473,500 


SCHWARTZ, EDWARD A. 


62 TODD POND 


RD 


665,800 


SCHWARTZ, ELLEN A. 


96 CONANT 


RD 


468,700 


SCOTT, ELEANOR B. 


5 GRASSHOPPER 


LN 


429,700 


SCOTTI, REGINA M. 


296 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


176,300 


SECKLER, DONALD A. 


91 LEXINGTON 


RD 


445,400 


SEECKTS, ELEANOR 


FARRAR 


RD 


137,300 


SEECKTS, ELEANOR R. 


34 FARRAR 


RD 


214,000 


SEECKTS. ELEANOR R. 


40 FARRAR 


RD 


336,400 


SEELEY, GEORGE W. 


212 CONCORD 


RD 


345,900 


SEIBEL, FREDERICK T. 


16 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


547,700 


SEITZ, C. CLAYTON 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


2,800 


SEITZ, C. CLAYTON 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


30,600 


SEITZ, C. CLAYTON 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


24,300 


SEITZ, C. CLAYTON 


218 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


683,600 


SELF, CRAIG 


31 BYPASS 


RD 


276.700 


SELLAND, JAMES 0. 


167 BEDFORD 


RD 


258,100 


SELSING, ERIK 


173 CONCORD 


RD 


397,900 


SEMERJIAN, EVANY. 


20 BLUEBERRY 


LN 


51 1 ,900 


SERVI, LESLIE DAVID 


38 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


347,300 


SEVILLE, JOAN E. 


252 LINCOLN 


RD 


370,200 


SEWALL, SUSAN M. 


74 DAVISON 


DR 


640,800 


SHAH, JAGRUTIC. 


41 GREENRIDGE 


LN 


226,400 


SHANSKY, ALAN 


26B INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


86,000 


SHANSKY, DAVID 


11 MOCCASIN 


HL 


506,400 



215 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 

SHAPIRO, DAVID 
SHAPSE, STEVEN N 
SHAW, LYNETTE 
SHAYE, GLENN, TR. 
SHEA, TIMOTHY M. 
SHEEHAN, GERALD G. 
SHEIK, MEHRDAD 
SHELDON, MARY W. 
SHUMAN.MARKD. 
SICHEL, ENID 
SICKELS, RICHARD 
SIEGA, FRANCESCO 
SIEGEL, ARTHUR J. 
SIEGEL, RONALD D. 
SIMMONS, JEFFREY LAW 
SIMON, MICHAEL P. 
SIMOURIAN, JOHN, TR. 
SIOSHANSI, PIRAN 
SISSON, BARBARA B 
SKINNER, EST.OF LOUIS T. 
SKINNER, LOUIS S. TR 
SLAUGHTER FRANK Gill 
SLAUGHTER, FRANK G III 
SLAVIN, GERALD D. 
SLAYTER.HENRYS.il 
SLISKI, ALAN PAUL 
SMITH FRANCES I 
SMITH, ALAN B. 
SMITH, BEVERLY JEAN 
SMITH, CARL D. 
SMITH, COLIN L.M. 
SMITH, CONVERSE B. 
SMITH, EDWARD W. Ill 
SMITH, GRAHAME J.C. 
SMITH, HAROLD DEAN 
SMITH, JULANN S. 
SMITH, PETER S. 
SMITH, ROBERT LANPHIER 
SMITH, STEVEN A. 
SMULOWICZ, BRONISLAW 
SMYERS, KAREN J. 
SNELL, JOHN 
SNELLING, CAROLYN R. 
SNELLING, CHARLES A. 
SNELLING, ELIZABETH J. 
SNELLING, JACQUELYN H. 
SNELLING, JOHN R. 



LOCATION 

190 WESTON 

166 BEDFORD 
189 LINCOLN 

59 SOUTH GREAT 
39 NORTH GREAT 

15 GILES 

11 HUNTLEY 
9 GRASSHOPPER 

31 HILLSIDE 
240 CONCORD 

20 BROOKS 
188 LINCOLN 
12L NORTH COMMONS 

20 LONG MEADOW 

16 OAK MEADOW 

16 GRANVILLE 

23 HUCKLEBERRY 
15 SMITH 
115 TRAPELO 
23 SOUTH GREAT 
25 SOUTH GREAT 

17 SOUTH GREAT 
SOUTH GREAT 

37 NORTH GREAT 

7 TRAPELO 
273 CONCORD 
109 OLD SUDBURY 

25 STONEHEDGE 
112 CHESTNUT 
221 TOWER 

8 TRAPELO 
239 CONCORD 
132 CHESTNUT 
119 CAMBRIDGE 

8 BOYCE FARM 
322 HEMLOCK 
OXBOW 

6 CANAAN 
219 TOWER 

7 MOCCASIN 
11 GILES 

84 OLD SUDBURY 
260 LINCOLN 
207 LINCOLN 

167 SOUTH GREAT 
4 FARRAR 

7 RIDGE 



TOTAL VALUE 

RD 415,000 

RD 233,100 

RD 602,800 

RD 595,800 

RD 323,200 

RD 303,300 

LN 315,600 

LN 425,300 

RD 451,500 

RD 321,500 

RD 409,600 

RD 708,900 

235,300 

RD 451,900 

570,300 

RD 481,400 

HL 439,700 

HL 623,200 

RD 427,700 

RD 1,561,000 

RD 273,700 

RD 1,504,600 

RD 24,800 

RD 406,900 

RD 423,800 

RD 349,826 

RD 349,500 

460,700 

CR 210,300 

RD 288.000 

RD 479,100 

RD 397,600 

CR 205,100 

TP 183,900 

RD 418,800 

CR 237,400 

RD 1,600 

DR 650,700 

RD 427,500 

HL 423.300 

RD 265,600 

RD 234,500 

RD 288,300 

RD 280,700 

RD 292,000 

RD 362,200 

RD 246,400 



216 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


SNOW, DEVELOPMENT CORP. 


OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


34,700 


SOC. FOR PRESERVATION N.E. ANT 


44 CODMAN 


RD 


272,300 


SOLAR, BARRY L. 


152 TRAPELO 


RD 


670,900 


SOLAR, JANE M. 


40 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


428,200 


SOLMAN, FRED JOHN III 


16 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


338,200 


SOULETTE NANCY B 


1 WOODS END 


RD 


710,000 


SOUTHWELL, DAVID P. 


BEAVER POND 


RD 


26,600 


SOUTHWELL, DAVID P. 


23 BEAVER POND 


RD 


807,500 


SPAETH, DANIEL A. 


124 BEDFORD 


RD 


293,500 


SPAULDINGTARAV 


13R SOUTH COMMONS 




210,600 


SPEEN CLAIRES 


15 OAK MEADOW 




534,100 


SPEERT, PETER K. 


4 FOX RUN 


RD 


471,300 


SPERLING, ARNOLD L 


7 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


347,100 


SPILIAKOS, JOHNS. 


29 GARLAND 


RD 


941 ,700 


SPINDLER, JAMES W. 


WESTON 


RD 


28,400 


SPINDLER. JAMES W. 


66 WESTON 


RD 


639,000 


SPINELLI, JUDITH A. 


14 WHEELER 


RD 


865,700 


SPINOSA KATHLEEN AGNES 


165 LEXINGTON 


RD 


566,800 


SPIRO, ALANM. 


115 TOWER 


RD 


804,300 


SPOONER, ARLETTA L. 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


130,000 


SPOONER, SUSAN B. 


48 TODD POND 


RD 


100,700 


SPRAGG, DEBORAH T 


14 WINTER 


ST 


580,400 


SPRAYREGEN, LUCY 


34 BAKER FARM 




539,800 


SQUIBB, MILDRED G. 


36 MILL 


ST 


373,400 


STAAB DAVID L 


105 LINCOLN 


RD 


1,176,600 


STALTER, GRACE E 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


226,500 


STAM, ALLAN C, JR. 


67 BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


537,600 


STAM, ALLAN C, JR. 


71 BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


242,000 


STAMATOPOULOS, GEORGE S 


204 TOWER 


RD 


742,900 


STANKARD, CHARLES E. JR. 


5 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


402,100 


STANZLER, ALAN L. 


BEAVER POND 


RD 


235,500 


STANZLER, ALAN L. 


15 BEAVER POND 


RD 


621.100 


STAPLES CHARLES 


51 PAGE 


RD 


566.400 


STAPLES, CHARLES 0. 


2 PAGE FARM 


RD 


124,000 


STASON, WILLIAM B 


29 SANDY POND 


RD 


578,800 


STATHIS, GREGORY 


36 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


613,800 


STATHOS, CHARLES A. 


69 TODD POND 


RD 


591 ,500 


STECHER, ROBERT W. 


31 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


441,700 


STEIN, BARRY J. 


6 OAK MEADOW 




678,100 


STEIN, JUDITH W. 


11C SOUTH COMMONS 




120,000 


STEIN, KITTY 


12 FARRAR 


RD 


344,800 


STEINBROOK, ROBERT L. 


8 PEIRCEHILL 


RD 


568,200 


STEINSKY, RUDOLPH S., TR. 


5 OLD CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


685,400 


STETSON. DAVID B 


4 BOYCE FARM 


RD 


733,500 


STEVENS, SHARI REAM 


30 SANDY POND 


RD 


719,100 


STEVENSON, JOHN P. 


28 WESTON 


RD 


474,100 


STEVENSON, PHILIP D. 


3 HAWTHORNE 


CR 


574,900 



217 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 

STEWART, FRANCIS J. JR. EST OF 
STEWART, MARY C. 
STOCK, JAMES H. 
STODDARD, ROBERT J. 
STODDARD, ROGER E. 
STODTE, JAN 
STORER, JAMES A. 
STOTT, SARA A. 
STOUT, JOSEPHINE I. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY. INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRATFORD REALTY COMPANY, INC. 
STRAUS, HASKEL 
STRECKER, WILLIAM D. 
STREET, EARLE B.& JANET H. TRS 
STRIKER, MARJORIE B. 
STROCK, BRUCE P., TRUSTEE 
STUPP, ROBERT W. 
SUBSICK, WALTER J. 
SUGAR, PETER C. 
SUMMERS, JULIA 
SUSSMAN, JOSEPH 
SUTHERLAND, ROBERT L. 
SVETZ, PAUL J. 
SVOLOS, GEORGE 
SWAIN, DOUGLAS M. 



LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


53 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


360,200 


140 LINCOLN 


RD 


220,400 


85 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


604,800 


8 WILLARCH 


RD 


270,300 


9 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


313,600 


9B SOUTH COMMONS 




86,000 


89 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


436,900 


144 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


323,500 


8 AIRPORT 


RD 


292,100 


STRATFORD 


WY 


18,300 


HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


24,900 


19 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


278,600 


21 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


286,200 


25 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


335,700 


35 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


379,600 


39 HUCKLEBERRY 


HL 


402,300 


STRATFORD 


WY 


392,900 


STRATFORD 


WY 


30,900 


STRATFORD 


WY 


56,100 


STRATFORD 


WY 


21 ,300 


STRATFORD 


WY 


1,800 


4 STRATFORD 


WY 


276,700 


5 STRATFORD 


WY 


273,700 


6 STRATFORD 


WY 


276,900 


8 STRATFORD 


WY 


300,400 


9 STRATFORD 


WY 


274,700 


10 STRATFORD 


WY 


303,700 


11 STRATFORD 


WY 


274,700 


12 STRATFORD 


WY 


274,900 


14 STRATFORD 


WY 


309,900 


15 STRATFORD 


WY 


274,200 


16 STRATFORD 


WY 


273,700 


17 STRATFORD 


WY 


280,400 


94 MILL 


ST 


669,500 


218 TOWER 


RD 


906,800 


9 MEADOWBROOK 


RD 


429,000 


211 SANDY POND 


RD 


368,900 


26 OAK MEADOW 




555,800 


5D SOUTH COMMONS 




195,500 


PHEASANT 


LN 


2,500 


10 MEADOWDAM 


RD 


603,600 


23 CONANT 


RD 


461 ,500 


196 SANDY POND 


RD 


535,400 


34 WINDINGWOOD 


LN 


384,200 


8 GRANVILLE 


RD 


436,700 


10 SILVER BIRCH 


LN 


356,700 


SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


2,600 



218 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 
SWAIN, DOUGLAS M. 
SWETT, JOAN D. 
SWIFT, PHYLLIS C. 
SYKES, DAVID F. 
SYLVIA, PAUL L. 
TALLY, BARBARA D. 
TAM EDWIN P 
TAN, DUONG T. 
TANG, ERIC 
TANG, THOMAS LC. 
TARTAGLIA, GIOVANNI 
TARTAGLIA, NUNZIO A. 
TASCHIOGLOU, KEMON P. 
TATEM, LEONARD J. 
TATLOCK, RICHARD 
TAUNTON-RIGBY, ALISON 
TAVOLIERI, EMMA, TR. 
TAYLOR, DOROTHY P. 
TAYLOR, JULIUS W. 
TAYLOR, TIMOTHY A. 
TAYLOR, WILLIAM F. 
TEABO, PRINCE C. 
TEABO, PRINCE C. 
TENNECO, INC. 
TENNICAN, MICHAEL L 
TERRELL, JOHN H. 
THE CARROLL SCHOOL 
THERIAULT, RICHARD H. 
THIELE, LESSIE ELAINE 
THOMAS JR GEORGE W 
THOMAS, JOSEPH 
THOMAS, NANCY C. 
THOMPSON, LAWRENCE E. 
THOMPSON, RANDALL, JR. 
THOMPSON, RANDALL, JR. 
THOMSON, ANNE PEARMAIN 
THORNE, KAREN O. 
THORNTON, PETER 
THREES REALTY TRUST 
THUROW, LESTER 
THUROW, LESTER C. 
TIERNEY, JOHN L. 
TIMMER.JURRIENH. 
TINDER, GLENN 
TINGLEY, FREDERICK M. 
TOBIN JAMES 
TOD, JANE N. TR. 



LOCATION 

143 SOUTH GREAT RD 

113 CHESTNUT CR 

25 PAGE RD 
215 OLD COUNTY ROAD EX 

7 PINE RIDGE RD 
336 HEMLOCK CR 

2 SUNNYSIDE LN 

73 CAMBRIDGE TP 

26 BEAVER POND RD 
24 GREENRIDGE LN 

162 SOUTH GREAT RD 

33 CONANT RD 
225 OLD CONCORD RD 
14C NORTH COMMONS 

80 WINTER ST 

8 FARRAR RD 
73 TODD POND RD 

133 BEDFORD RD 

192 WESTON RD 

9 GRANVILLE RD 

17 OAK MEADOW 

LINCOLN RD 

150 LINCOLN RD 

CAMBRIDGE TP 
52 STONEHEDGE 

50 LINCOLN RD 
72 CODMAN RD 

5 BROOKS HL 

18 PAGE RD 
12 OLD WINTER ST 

34 BLACK BURNIAN RD 
15 TWIN POND LN 
44 CONANT RD 

BEDFORD RD 

34 BEDFORD RD 

43 OLD SUDBURY RD 

10 FARRAR RD 

TODD POND RD 

160 LINCOLN RD 

92 DAVISON DR 

90 DAVISON DR 

20 OAK MEADOW 

4 GOOSE POND RD 

51 STONEHEDGE 

5 LAUREL DR 
33 HUCKLEBERRY HL 
26 GREENRIDGE LN 



TOTAL VALUE 

430,900 
249,300 
444,800 
436,100 
331 ,300 
392,300 
296,900 
210,400 

1 ,022,700 
223,200 
283,000 
884,400 
613,600 
182,600 
532,700 
327,000 
545,600 
347,400 
487,800 
364,500 
609,200 
25,600 
324,400 
500 
520,500 
384,600 
369,600 
551,100 

2,009,000 
329,400 
712,400 
454,300 
486,600 
46,900 

1,016,900 
296,700 
306,400 
10,800 
539,000 
299,700 
716,600 
550,500 
564,400 
460,100 
414,900 

1 ,257,200 
221,100 



219 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1 996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


TODD, CONRAD 


126 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


1 ,002,400 


TODD, CONRAD H. 


OLD CONCORD 


RD 


33,400 


TOMASIC, BEVERLY F. 


22 GOOSE POND 


RD 


631 ,700 


TONRY.JOHNL. 


31 MILL 


ST 


379,200 


TORIAN, JUDITH C. 


12 GREENRIDGE 


LN 


215,600 


TORODE, HERBERT L 


82 CONANT 


RD 


424,000 


TORRI, MYRA M. 


26 OLD FARM 


RD 


431 ,300 


TORTI, MAURICE L JR. 


119 WESTON 


RD 


548,000 


TRACEY, CAROLINE J. 


11 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


353,300 


TRACEY, ROBERT J 


118 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


164,900 


TRACEY, ROBERT J. 


BEDFORD 


RD 


21 ,700 


TRACEY, ROBERT J. 


BEDFORD 


RD 


99,700 


TRACEY, ROBERT J. 


124 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


130,300 


TRACEY, ROBERT J. 


125 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


154,800 


TRACEY, ROBERT J. 


131 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


269,400 


TRACY, TARA E. 


36A INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


100,000 


TRAVERS, PAUL 


228 OLD COUNTY ROAD 


EX 


451,000 


TRAVIS, GEORGE F. 


62 OXBOW 


RD 


41 1 ,700 


TREVELYAN, EOIN 


7 OAK KNOLL 


RD 


262,700 


TRIPP, CYNTHIA/ROBERT CHAPIN 


111 TOWER 


RD 


398,300 


TRIPPE CHARLES W 


16 DEER RUN 


RD 


623,400 


TROISI, EUGENE A. 


27 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


306,000 


TROISI, FERDINAND L. 


34 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


257,200 


TRYDER, MICHAEL J. 


7 JUNIPER RIDGE 


RD 


31 2,500 


TSAI, HAIPING PHILIP 


32 GREENRIDGE 


LN 


225,500 


TSAI, TZUFU K. 


9 MILL STREET 


EX 


575,100 


TSANG VINCENT 


20 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


165,800 


TURNER, JAMES R. 


3 ACORN 


LN 


345,100 


TUROWSKI, EDMUND J. 


SILVER HILL 


RD 


38,300 


TUROWSKI, EDMUND J. 


7 SILVER HILL 


RD 


610,100 


TWO GILES ROAD REALTY TRUST 


2 GILES 


RD 


471,000 


TYLER, P. C/O PAUL CURTIS 


135 CHESTNUT 


CR 


255,300 


TYLER, WATSON HEIRS OF 


98 CONCORD 


RD 


228,300 


TYLKO, JOHN 


BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


46,800 


TYLKO, JOHN J. JR. 


34 BAKER BRIDGE 


RD 


915,600 


ULLMAN, STEVEN M. 


11 LONG MEADOW 


RD 


536,100 


UMBRELLO, FRANCIS 


280 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


323,200 


UMBRO, PAUL N. & DIANE, TRS. 


19 WARBLER SPRINGS 


RD 


815,200 


UMPHREY, WILLARD 


14D NORTH COMMONS 




204,500 


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 


OLD BEDFORD 


RD 


15,800 


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 


39 VIRGINIA 


RD 


482,900 


URETSKY, JOSEPH F. 


25 OAK MEADOW 




506,400 


URION, DAVID K. 


3 PEIRCE HILL 


RD 


589,200 


URNER, JOSEPH F. 


99 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


430,200 


VALE, LAWRENCE J. 


103 CONANT 


RD 


804,200 


VALLEAU, PAMELA M. 


123 BEDFORD 


RD 


295,000 


VALLES, CYNTHIA 


36C INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


153,900 



220 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 

VALLEY POND CORPORATION 

VALLEY POND CORPORATION 

VALLEY POND CORPORATION 

VALPEY, JOHN B. 

VAN AUSDALL GAY 

VAN VLECK, MARY, TR. 

VAN VLEET CHARLES C 

VANDAM, FAYTHE ABBER 

VANLEER RACHEL D. 

VANLEER, R. KARL 

VATAHA, RANDEL E. 

VELIE, ANN E. 

VELINGMARYJO 

VERCOLLONE, CARL R. 

VERCOLLONE, JULIA 

VERMA, DHARMENDRA T. 

VERNICK SHEILA K 

VET, MARIA F. 

VITALE, CHRISTINE 

VITZ FRANK 

VOGT, MARY W. 

VON HERRMANN, TIMOTHY 

VON MERTENS, PETER B. 

WADE DIANTHA L 

WADSWORTH, ROBERT R. 

WADSWORTH, VIRGINIA D. 

WALES, PHILIP M. 

WALES, RUTH J., TRUSTEE 

WALKER THOMAS H 

WALKER, JOHN F. 

WALKER, STEVEN J. TR. 

WALLACE, DEBORAH ELLEN 

WALLROTH, DONALD E. 

WALLWORK EDWIN N. 

WALSH, PATRICIA R. 

WALTER, CHARLTON M. & ROSLY M. 

WANG, AN 

WANG, AN 

WANG, AN 

WANG, AN 

WANG, AN 

WANG, CHIU-CHEN 

WANG, FREDERICKA. 

WANG, GIGI 

WANG, THOMAS C. 

WANG, THOMAS C. 

WANG, YANTSE 



LOCATION 

CONANT 

CONANT 

WESTON 

135 BEDFORD 

16 GREENRIDGE 
146 CHESTNUT 
21 BLACK BURNIAN 
22C INDIAN CAMP 
CONANT 
59 CONANT 
36 LONG MEADOW 
15B SOUTH COMMONS 
27 WINTER 

4 TODD POND 
178 WESTON 

35 BIRCHWOOD 
14B NORTH COMMONS 

11 JUNIPER RIDGE 

12 SILVER BIRCH 
18 STOREY 

88 OLD SUDBURY 
108 LINCOLN 

16 TOWER 
134 CHESTNUT 

43 GREENRIDGE 

16 BIRCHWOOD 

56 TODD POND 

18 MOCCASIN 

12 TRAPELO 

5 LONG MEADOW 
CAMBRIDGE 

7 CEDAR 

8 DEER RUN 
8 LINWAY 

352 HEMLOCK 
58 CONANT 

BEDFORD 

BEDFORD 
100 BEDFORD 

OAK KNOLL 

ROCKWOOD 

4 OLD FARM 
41 TODD POND 
31 BLACK BURNIAN 

UPLAND FIELD 
10 UPLAND FIELD 
25 SUNNYSIDE 



TOTAL VALUE 

RD 7,650 

RD 40,625 

RD 18,625 

RD 419,000 

LN 229,000 

CR 261,900 

RD 1,150,400 

LN 100,000 

RD 253,500 

RD 636,400 

RD 494,300 
86,000 

ST 310,700 

RD 629,600 

RD 271 ,300 

LN 291 ,000 
150,600 

RD 298,200 

LN 289,800 

DR 567,900 

RD 183,000 

RD 548,900 

RD 495,100 

CR 247,500 

LN 225,700 

LN 355,800 

RD 123,700 

HL 466,100 

RD 522,500 

RD 442,800 

TP 6,200 

RD 331,900 

RD 590,100 

RD 291,100 

CR 195,500 

RD 699,600 

RD 51,200 

RD 131,100 

RD 655,300 

RD 158,200 

LN 14,300 

RD 514,300 

RD 124,700 

RD 851,200 

RD 24,200 

RD 445,200 

LN 258,400 



221 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


WARBLER SPRINGS CORPORATION 


WARBLER SPRINGS 


RD 


1,800 


WARBLER SPRINGS ROAD TRUST 


TOWER 


RD 


34,700 


WARD, JANE L. 


3 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


290,100 


WARNER, PATRICIA R. 


46 TODD POND 


RD 


153,800 


WARREN, DUNCAN O. 


17 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


284,800 


WARREN, JOAN B. 


138 LEXINGTON 


RD 


259,100 


WATERSIDE REALTY TR 


169 LEXINGTON 


RD 


220,500 


WATERSIDE REALTY TRUST 


171 LEXINGTON 


RD 


888,300 


WATKINSON, PETER J. 


9 WHEELER 


RD 


607,700 


WAUGH, JOHNS., TR. 


60 CONANT 


RD 


541,000 


WEBB, HEIDI R. 


19 STONEHEDGE 




533,700 


WEBB, ROBERT H. 


9 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


396,000 


WECHSLER JOELK. 


50 WINDINGWOOD 


LN 


349,900 


WEIGEL, LYNN B. 


233 CONCORD 


RD 


589,000 


WEIGEL, LYNN B. 


9 PAGE FARM 


RD 


816,100 


WEINBERG, ARNOLD N. 


234 TOWER 


RD 


685,900 


WEINSTEIN CYNTHIA R 


75 WINTER 


ST 


314,900 


WEINSTEIN, SHARON R. 


23 MORNINGSIDE 


LN 


281 ,700 


WEISGALL WILDER, DEBORAH 


22 TWIN POND 


LN 


537,300 


WEISMANN, RODGER E., JR. 


14 TODD POND 


RD 


1,301,500 


WELCH. MICHAEL F. 


30L INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


110,000 


WELCH, VERNONF..TR. 


190 BEDFORD 


RD 


242,500 


WELLS, BENJAMIN A. 


5 HILLIARD 


RD 


556.500 


WELLSPRING BUILDING CORP. 


111 OLD COUNTY 


RD 


702,400 


WENGREN, RICHARD ET AL 


CANAAN 


DR 


27,800 


WENGREN, RICHARD ET ALS 


CANAAN 


DR 


36,800 


WESLER, WENDY L 


38 WINDINGWOOD 


LN 


347,500 


WEST, SHARI A. 


35 TODD POND 


RD 


75.000 


WESTCOTT, VERNON C. 


2 JUNIPER RIDGE 


RD 


282,200 


WESTON RD REALTY TRUST 


WESTON 


RD 


338,300 


WHALEN DAVID 


154 BEDFORD 


RD 


250,700 


WHATLEY, ROBERT B., TR. 


176 BEDFORD 


RD 


250,100 


WHEELER, BELLA C. 


14 OLD CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


266,900 


WHINSTON, MICHAEL D. 


230 TOWER 


RD 


766,900 


WHITE, ARNETTA M. 


4R NORTH COMMONS 




130,000 


WHITE, CHRISTOPHER A. 


2 FORESTER 


RD 


440,700 


WHITE, ELINOR 


72 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


278,000 


WHITE, JAMES B. 


BEDFORD 


RD 


50,400 


WHITE, JAMES B. 


38 BEDFORD 


RD 


837,200 


WHITE, JAMES B., TR. 


BEDFORD 


RD 


47,900 


WHITE, JAMES B, TR. 


BEDFORD 


RD 


6.000 


WHITE, JASPER 


45 STONEHEDGE 




601 ,600 


WHITE, JOHN R. 


32 STONEHEDGE 




555,500 


WHITE, ROBERT E. 


153 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


346,200 


WHITMAN, DAVID A, TR 


28 WINDINGWOOD 


LN 


339,500 


WHITMAN, LAWRENCE W. 


4 HAWTHORNE 


CR 


471,100 


WIEN, JOELH. 


10 BROOKS 


HL 


554,100 



222 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1, 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


WIERCINSKI, ROBERTA. 


29 BROOKS 


RD 


429,400 


WIGGIN, RICHARD C. 


59 WINTER 


ST 


588,500 


WILBOR.ANNEE. 


15 MINEBROOK 


RD 


690,200 


WILFERT, FRED J. 


87 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


303,300 


WILLEMIN, JULIAN V. 


25 BYPASS 


RD 


262,100 


WILLIAMS JR, EDWIN L. 


9 ROCKWOOD 


LN 


243,500 


WILLIAMS, BENJAMIN J JR 


32 BEAVER POND 


RD 


560,500 


WILLIAMS, JOHN D. 


9 GARLAND 


RD 


947,300 


WILLIAMS, JOHN D. 


42 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


327,600 


WILLIAMS, PAMELA M. 


298 SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


369,800 


WILLIAMS, WILLIAM D. 


56 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


332,900 


WILLMANN, WERNER S. 


45 SANDY POND 


RD 


590,100 


WILMOT, J. THOMAS 


8 LONG MEADOW 


RD 


454,600 


WILSON, DONALD H. 


11 LIN WAY 


RD 


408,700 


WILSON, JOHN S. 


OXBOW 


RD 


500 


WILSON, LORETTA E. 


242 ASPEN 


CR 


225,100 


WILSON, ROBERT J. 


46A INDIAN CAMP 


LN 


100,000 


WINCHELL GORDON D 


215 CONCORD 


RD 


702,900 


WINCHELL, FREDERICK CLARKE 


221 CONCORD 


RD 


363,400 


WINCHELL, GUILBERTS. 


80 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


580,600 


WINCHELL, RICHARD P. 


48 WINDINGWOOD 


LN 


447,100 


WINCHELL, WILLIAM F. 


5 WINCHELSEA 


LN 


703,600 


WINSHIP, LEEC. 


35 BROOKS 


RD 


375,400 


WINSHIP, THOMAS 


OLD CONCORD 


RD 


1,400 


WINSHIP, THOMAS 


233 OLD CONCORD 


RD 


1,006,100 


WINTHROP, SARA J. 


16A NORTH COMMONS 




120,000 


WISE JOHN B 


186 BEDFORD 


RD 


481,200 


WISE ROBERT EJR 


181 BEDFORD 


RD 


467,800 


WITHERBY, MARIANNE J.H. 


335 HEMLOCK 


CR 


285,500 


WOJNO, JAMES A. 


2B NORTH COMMONS 




149,300 


WOLF, ROBERT 


12 MEADOWBROOK 


RD 


542,200 


WOLFF, JAMES A, JR. 


90 CONANT 


RD 


531,300 


WOLFF, ROBERT LEE, JR. 


50 OLD WINTER 


ST 


951,900 


WOLFSBERG, JAMES M. 


4 GARLAND 


RD 


1 ,035,700 


WOLL, EDWARD 


241 ASPEN 


CR 


259,100 


WONG, JUDITH A. 


108 CODMAN 


RD 


308,800 


WOO, ROBERT 


12 OAK KNOLL 


RD 


268,200 


WOO, WAY DONG 


13 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


354,800 


WOOD, HILVE V. ESTATE OF 


121 TOWER 


RD 


389,900 


WOOD, JOANNES. 


134 BEDFORD 


RD 


359,100 


WOOD, NANCYS. 


9 GILES 


RD 


295,200 


WOOD, RONALD F. 


19 JUNIPER RIDGE 


RD 


318,800 


WOOD, VIRGINIAS. 


SOUTH GREAT 


RD 


191,400 


WOODINGTON, MARY L. 


222 CONCORD 


RD 


307,500 


WOODVALE FARM LAND TRUST 


PAGE 


RD 


67,000 


WOODWARD, JOHN W. 


8 OAK MEADOW 




608,800 


WORSH, ARTHUR J. 


10C NORTH COMMONS 




185,900 



223 



Real Property Assessments as of January 1 , 1996 



OWNER NAME 


LOCATION 




TOTAL VALUE 


WRIGHT, ANDREW 


9 OAK MEADOW 




505,900 


WU, MICHAEL M. 


6D NORTH COMMONS 




229,600 


WU, PEI-RIN 


4 HIDDENWOOD 


PT 


352,200 


WYATT, PETER W. 


15 JUNIPER RIDGE 


RD 


340,500 


WYMAN, MICHAEL T. 


21 BIRCHWOOD 


LN 


317,600 


YAGJIAN, JACOB 


CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


79,800 


YAMRON, JOSEPH 


88 LINCOLN 


RD 


576,100 


YANOWITZ, JOEL 


25 RED RAIL FARM 




637,900 


YATES, M. PAIGE 


50 TODD POND 


RD 


124,200 


YEPREM, EDIK 


39 DEERHAVEN 


RD 


399,800 


Yl, CHENG-YING LU 


20 SUNNYSIDE 


LN 


273,400 


YORE, GEORGE P. 


316 CAMBRIDGE 


TP 


141,700 


YOS, JERROLD M. 


17 MILL STREET 


EX 


353,800 


YOUNG, ANNE 


41 BEDFORD 


RD 


684,900 


YOUNG, G. STEWART 


55 OXBOW 


RD 


465,700 


YOUNG, LEE A. 


144 CHESTNUT 


CR 


300,600 


YUN, CHRISTOPHER S. 


52 GREENRIDGE 


LN 


148,700 


ZEE, MOLLY B., TR. 


164 SANDY POND 


RD 


360,100 


ZIEFERT, HARRIET M. 


12 PAGE FARM 


RD 


506,400 


ZIMMERMAN, HERBERT E., TR. 


OXBOW 


RD 


5,500 


ZOCK, ROBERT A., TR. 


10 BEAVER POND 


RD 


438,400 


ZUELKE, LAURENCE W. 


36 OLD SUDBURY 


RD 


334,400 



224 




FINANCIAL SECTION AND WARRANT FOR THE 

1997 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



Glossary __ 

Debt Exclusion and Capital Exclusion 

Proposition 2 1 /2 allows a town to raise monies for capital projects or for the payment 
of debt service costs using either a capital or debt exclusion, respectively. Unlike 
the override, which results in a permanent increase in the town's levy limit, a capital 
exclusion is added to the levy limit or ceiling only for the year in which the project is 
being undertaken. Likewise, a debt exclusion is added to the levy limit or levy 
ceiling for the life of the debt only. Both of these exclusions require a 2/3 vote of 
the Selectmen in order to be placed on a ballot, with a majority of the electorate 
needed for authorization. 

Free Cash 

This is money that had been appropriated but not spent for various budget line 
items together with unforeseen revenues. These monies are certified annually by 
the Department of Revenue as the town's free cash. 

After discussions with bond rating agencies and various financial institutions, the 
Finance Committee and the Selectmen have agreed on a policy of maintaining a 
level of free cash equal to a minimum of 5% of the operating budget. In addition, 
we agree that it is prudent to spend no more than about 50% of the free cash in 
any given year. With this policy in place we should maintain our current high bond 
rating of Aa1 , which should keep down the cost of borrowing. 

Levy (Tax), Levy Ceiling , and Levy Limit 

The property tax levy, or simply the levy, is the revenue the Town can raise 
through real and personal property taxes. In Massachusetts, municipal revenues to 
cover expenditures are raised through the property tax levy, State Aid, and local 
receipts. The property tax levy is usually the largest source of revenue. 

Proposition 2 1 /2 places constraints on the magnitude of the levy imposed by a town 
as well as the amount by which the levy can be increased from one year to the 
next. The two limits on property taxes imposed by Proposition 2 1 /2 are: 

levy ceiling - This establishes an overall cap on the levy. Ordinarily a town 
cannot levy more than 2.5% of the total full and fair cash value of all taxable real 
and personal property. 

levy limit - The maximum levy allowed in a given year is the levy limit. This will 
always be equal to or less than the levy ceiling. The levy limit for any fiscal year 
amounts to the previous year's levy limit (less excluded debt) increased by 2.5% 
plus new growth, exclusions, and any override authorized by the electorate. 

Levy Increase 

The difference in the levy between one year and the next is the levy increase. This 
number is often represented as a percent. The Town may set its levy at any 
amount up to its levy limit. It is important to recognize that the actual levy may 
increase more than 2.5% in a given year. This is allowable under Proposition 2 1 /2. 



REPORT 



of the 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



of the 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



for the 



FISCAL YEAR 



JULY 1,1997 - JUNE 3 0, 1998 



LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



LINCOLN FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Thomas Black 

Georgene B. Herschbach 

Jacquelyn Lenth 

Marcia A. Roehr 

Alvin L. Schmertzler 

Peter J. Watkinson 

Gary A. Taylor, Chairman 

Judith Wong, Secretary 



COVER: Something old, something new 

As we move towards the next century, it became self-evident that our Public Safety 
Building (top photo), constructed in 1958, needed substantial modernization to keep up 
with current codes and technology. The renovations and additions (shown in the model 
photo at the bottom) will achieve our current needs, while preserving within the new 
complex usable portions of the old structure. We wish to thank the Public Safety 
Building Committee and all Town boards and citizens of Lincoln for their support and 
help in the design process. 



Preface 

The Finance Committee (FinCom) has embarked on a planning process which takes 
into account both the present and future financial needs of the Town of Lincoln. 
Throughout this process we have been mindful of Lincoln citizens' dual mandate: to 
provide first-rate Town services and also to control spending. It has been a special 
challenge to satisfy both aspects of this mandate, particularly during the current cycle of 
renewal of major components of our physical plant - our elementary schools and public 
safety building. 

Careful analysis of the future consequences of spending today has led to some difficult 
choices: capital projects postponed or forgone, and constraints on all operating 
budgets. We had to make compromises to keep expenditures aligned with resources, 
both Free Cash and projected revenues. 

The Town will still spend more than $18 million in the next fiscal year, and in our 
opinion, will spend it well. We can be very proud of the schools and services available 
in Lincoln. We can also be proud of and grateful for the competent and devoted 
employees who serve us so well. 

The Finance Committee has revised further our Annual Report with the goal of 
increasing its usefulness to readers. In particular, we have rearranged the Table of 
Contents such that the basic information about the Town Budget and special issues 
before us - Budget Overview, Expenses, Revenues, and Balancing the Budget - is 
presented in the first eight pages of this booklet. Also the Glossary has been moved to 
the inside cover for ready access. 

Please note that the budget numbers for General Government are different from those 
printed in our last report. These changes are the result of the new account structure in 
the software recently adopted by the Town's Financial Office. The adjustments make 
all years' budgets comparable. 

We hope you find our Annual Report helpful. Your suggestions for further 
improvements are always welcome. 









Table of Contents 



1 Budget Overview 1 

2 Expenses 2 

Table 1: Expense Summary 3 

Figurel: Expense Distribution 4 

3 Revenues 

Figure 2: Revenue Distribution 5 

Revenues 6 

Table 2: Revenue Summary 7 

4 Balancing the Budget 8 

5 Long Range Planning 9 

6 Departmental Budgets 

General Government 10 

Public Safety 11 

Education 

Elementary Schools 12 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 14 

Minuteman Science -Technology High School 15 

Public Works & Facilities 16 

Human Services 17 

Library 18 

Recreation 19 

Debt Service 20 

Pensions and Insurance 21 

Water Department 22 

6 Appendix 

Table 3: Tax Rate History 23 

Table 4: Fiscal Detail FY96 - FY98 24 

7 Warrant Articles 35 



Budget Overview 



This year's budget process has been difficult because the Finance Committee has 
aggressively sought to restrain spending despite a substantial free cash 1 balance. 
This parsimony amidst apparent plenty is, we believe, justified by our financial 
projections. These indicate that while free cash and other resources might meet 
Lincoln's near-term fiscal needs, restraining growth in operating budgets is necessary 
to put the Town on a sound financial footing for the long term. 

Budget planning for the Town is dominated in the near term by high levels of debt 
service from construction projects at the school and the public safety facility. Debt 
service affects tax rates directly through debt exclusions passed by previous Town 
Meetings. These translate into relatively large tax increases in the next two fiscal 
years with smaller increases thereafter as excluded debt declines. 

In the longer term the pressing issue is operating expenditures that are growing faster 
than projected revenues. To resolve this problem we can either raise revenues or lower 
expenditures. The Finance Committee believes that fiscal prudence and recent 
messages from Lincoln voters require that every effort first be made to lower 
expenditures before seeking to raise revenues through overrides. 

A positive developmnt this year is the successful conclusion of collective bargaining 
with Lincoln's employee unions. This yielded not only reasonable salary increases, but 
also a restructuring of employee health insurance that will substantially reduce costs. 
The FinCom commends all participants in this process for their diligence and goodwill. 
Another positive factor is our large free cash balance. This is due to delay of the 
Public Safety Building Project (interest on unused funds) and to Lincoln citizens' 
surprisingly robust appetite recently for new automobiles (excise tax receipts). 

Against this background, the FinCom has sought two objectives. The first is to 
minimize the tax impact of recent construction projects. Here we propose to employ 
stabilization funds and other available monies to reduce excluded debt. Free cash 
would also be used liberally to fund operating budgets and pressing capital needs. 
These steps hold tax increases in FY98 and FY99 below the FinCom target of 5%. 

The second objective is to retard growth in expenditures. The FinCom recommended 
cuts of approximately $125,000 from budgets proposed by the Town, schools, and 
library. In addition we urged reductions of about $175,000 from Warrant Articles 
supported initially by the Capital Planning Committee. We appreciate the cooperation 
we received from all the agencies involved and believe these reductions will not 
materially compromise services. 

Proposed expenditures and projected revenues are set out in Tables 1 and 2 and 
illustrated in Figures 1 and 2. 2 Overall and operating expenditures are up respectively 



'Terms appearing in the text in bold type are defined in the glossary. 

2 For convenience, numbers in Tables 1 & 2 and in operating budgets are in thousands of dollars. 



11.3% and 4.8%. The Town's revenue requirements are met under the FinCom 
proposal with a tax increase of 4.5% and the application of $1 .24 million in free cash. 

Expenses 

The increase in overall expenditures of more than 11% (see Table 1) occurs even after 
Finance Committee reductions in proposed budgets and warrant requests of 
approximately $300,000. This jump is somewhat less alarming than it might otherwise 
appear because a significant portion of it is due to non-recurring factors - debt service 
and Warrant Articles for replacement of the Town's capital stock. 

Debt service is peaking this year and thus will not contribute further to growth in 
expenditures, unless the Town assumes new obligations. The high level of Warrant 
Articles reflects the need to replace our aging fleet of vehicles and to complete our 
investment in computer technology. These expenditures too should begin to decline 
next year. 

The remainder of the Town's expenditures, its operating budgets, are up 4.8%. This 
rate of growth, even after paring by the FinCom, remains a cause for concern because 
it exceeds both inflation and the projected rate of growth in Lincoln's revenues. Areas 
showing particularly high growth are the Public Works Department and the schools. 
Because these increases are driven by factors that will continue to influence costs, they 
complicate keeping Lincoln's budgets in balance in the long term. 

Public Works expenditures are rising because of Lincoln's participation in NESWC, a 
cooperative arrangement among many municipalities for the disposal of trash. Under 
this long-term contract, negotiated in the 1 980s, Lincoln is obligated to pay tipping fees 
that will escalate sharply over the next several years. 

Costs at the Lincoln schools and at Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School (LSRHS) are 
rising faster than inflation, despite reasonable salary increases. Growth in enrollments 
and special education requirements drive these increases. Demographics and trends 
in special education suggest such factors will continue to pressure budgets. Lincoln's 
assessment for high school costs will likely increase nearly 10% per year over the next 
several years due to the rising percentage of Lincoln students at LSRHS. For the 
Lincoln campus enrollment growth, more special needs students, and higher costs of 
operating newly expanded facilities will drive budgets upward. 

In this budget the FinCom has sought to cut costs wherever it can and to push Town 
agencies for better productivity. We shall continue to do this. Ultimately, however, 
there is a finite amount that can be wrung in this manner from expenditures; further 
budget tightening can only come through reductions in services. Lincoln provides an 
extraordinary level of service for a town its size. If citizens continue to demand services 
at this level, revenues will eventually have to be raised to support them. 



TABLE 1 
Expense Summary 



FY96 FY97 

Actual Budget % 

$ $ Increase 



FY98 

Proposed % 
$ Increase 



Operating Expenses 



General Government 


981 


1,211 


23.4% 


1,185 


-2.1% 


Public Safety 


1,607 


1,682 


4.6% 


1,773 


5.4% 


Elementary Schools 


4,669 


4,907 


5.1% 


5,208 


6.1% 


Secondary Schools 


1,266 


1,445 


14.1% 


1,568 


8.5% 


Public Works & Facilities 


888 


1,015 


14.3% 


1,133 


11.6% 


Human Services 


167 


183 


9.3% 


177 


-3.1% 


Library 


472 


495 


4.9% 


516 


4.2% 


Recreation & Celebrations 


212 


237 


1 1 .6% 


241 


1 .8% 


Conservation 


69 


75 


8.1% 


77 


2.9% 


Pensions & Insurance 


1,425 


1,574 


10.5% 


1,566 


-0.5% 


Total Town Operating 


11,756 


12,822 


9.1% 


13,443 


4.8% 


Debt Service 


1,446 


1,799 


24.4% 


2,325 


29.2% 


Water Deparatment 


316 
13,518 


382 
15,002 


20.8% 
1 1 .0% 


400 


4.8% 


Total Article 5 


16,168 


7.8% 



Warrants 



Water Surplus 


601 


250 


-58.4% 


475 


90.0% 


Articles-Capital Program 


1,039 


507 


-51.2% 


920 


81.5% 


Maintenance & Other 


115 


99 


-13.9% 


93 


-6.1% 


State Highway 


217 


217 


0.0% 


217 


0.1% 


Education Reform Funds 


157 


190 


21.0% 


225 


18.2% 


Stabilization 


168 





-100.0% 





0.0% 


Total Warrants 


2,297 


1,263 


-45.0% 


1,930 


52.8% 


TOTAL EXPENDITURES 


15,815 


16,265 


2.8% 


18,098 


1 1 .3% 



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Revenues 

Revenues come from various sources, the largest of which is property taxes (see Table 
2). Under Proposition 2h, property tax increases in any year are limited to 2.5% overj 
the previous year's levy limit (net of excluded debt) plus any revenues attributable \o\ 
new construction. For FY98 the Proposition 2H levy limit is $10.5 million. Revenuesij 
based upon new construction are estimated at $160,000. 

Additional tax revenues may be raised through debt exclusions or overrides. No.*) 
override is contemplated this year. Previously the Town has voted to exclude debtil 
service associated with numerous land acquisitions and construction projects (see 
section entitled Debt Service). In FY98, revenues to cover excluded debt amounting* 
to $1.26 million must be raised net of grant and stabilization fund monies and Schoolil 
Building Project reimbursement from the State Facilities Siting Board (SFSB). Thusi 
the overall amount to be collected through taxes, the sum of the levy limit, newl 
construction, and excluded debt, would be $1 1 .94 million. As indicated in Table 2, 
this represents a tax increase for FY98 of 4.5%. 

Other sources of funds are: local receipts, State Aid, available funds, and free cash. 
Local receipts include motor vehicle excise taxes, charges for such items as 
recreational programs and ambulance service, license and permit fees, and investment 
income. For FY98 estimates of these sources have been increased substantially to 
nearly $1 .9 million due largely to a jump in vehicle excise tax receipts. State Aid (net of 
State charges) is projected at $1.84 million including the $681,036 from the SFSB. 
Available funds totaling $1.72 million for FY98 consist mainly of highway funds 
($217,173) and water revenues ($935,310), which are either earmarked or simply pass 
through the budget without providing operating funds. This year available funds would 
also include $196,000 from a Landfill Capping Grant and $225,000 from thej 
stabilization fund we propose be applied to reduce excluded debt and the tax rate. 

Free cash represents unused funds from past budgets now available to the Town for 
appropriation. It consists of unspent appropriations returned in previous fiscal years 
and of revenues received in excess of budget estimates. Because there is a two-year 
lag in free cash accounting, the current free cash balance of $2.41 million results from 
actions relating to FY96 and earlier years. This balance is net of $230,000 voted for 
the Public Safety Building Project overrun at the recent Special Town Meeting. As 
explained in the following section, the FinCom recommends drawing down free cash 
over the next several years to the minimum levels deemed necessary to maintain fiscal 
stability and to assure attractive financing terms for the Town. For FY98 Free cash use 
would amount to $1 .24 million, about 52% of the existing balance. 

Revenues in the proposed budget, including the use of free cash, total $18.98 million. 
Net of flow-through items and various amounts that must be paid to other governmental 
agencies or held for tax abatements, funds remaining for appropriation are $18.10 
million. 



TABLE 2 
Revenue Summary 





FY96 


FY97 


FY98 




Actual 


Budget 


% 


Proposed 


% 




$ 


$ 


Increase 


$ 


Increase 


Taxes 












Levy Base 




10,071 




10,520 


4.5% 


New Construction 




184 




160 


-13.0% 


Excluded Debt 




1,021 




1,258 


23.2% 


Override 







2.6% 



11,939 


0.0% 


Tax Levy 


10,991 


11,276 


5.9% 


Other Revenues 












Local Receipts 


2,272 


1,618 


-28.8% 


1,877 


16.0% 


Water Revenues 


1,009 


700 


-30.6% 


935 


33.6% 


Highway Bond Funds 


217 


217 


0.0% 


217 


0.0% 


Other Available Funds 


349 


175 


-49.9% 


344 


96.6% 


State Aid 












SFSB 


681 


681 


0.0% 


681 


0.0% 


Other 


1,047 


1,129 


7.8% 


1,157 


2.5% 


Free Cash 


1,036 


940 


-9.3% 


1,242 


32.1% 


From Stabilization 










225 


NA 


Assessments 


-330 


-471 


42.7% 
-5.8% 


-519 


10.2% 


TOTAL REVENUES 


17,272 


16,265 


18,098 


11.3% 


TAX INCREASE 






0.9% 




4.5% 



Balancing The Budget 



The primary focus in developing the budget for FY98 has been cutting costs. As 
indicated earlier, this is driven in part by financial projections that show operating 
budgets increasing faster than can be sustained with property taxes under the 
Proposition 2 1 /2 formula. Future considerations are not the entire problem, however, as 
current deficits also contribute to Finance Committee concerns. 

Without overrides, expected revenues from property taxes, local receipts, State Aid, 
and so on are projected to increase at a rate of about 3.8% annually over the next five 
years exclusive of excluded debt. Budgets initially proposed to the Finance 
Committee by Town departments and the schools, along with fairly optimistic 
assumptions about future growth in costs, yielded projections of annual increases in 
expenditures net of debt service of over 4.2%. 

Requested budgets and Warrant Articles for FY98 also exceeded expected revenues 
for FY98 by more than $1 .5 million. While it would have been possible to supply this 
amount from the current free cash balance, we felt it would be imprudent to do so for 
two reasons. The first is that to draw the Town's $2.41 million in free cash down by 
$1 .5 million would violate Finance Committee guidelines limiting the use of free cash in 
any year to 50% of the existing balance. Even more fundamental, however, is the 
threat posed by the combination of the current deficit and growth in expenditures 
exceeding growth in revenues. This combination leads inevitably to increasing deficits. 

Under these circumstances, the FinCom has thus felt compelled to advise Town 
agencies to bring growth in expenses more in line with expected revenues. This has 
meant reductions from proposed operating budgets and capital spending approximating 
$300,000. As a result, the use of free cash required in FY98 is more consistent with 
FinCom guidelines, and expected operating expenditures in future years have declined. 

Even with these cuts, growth in costs, driven by factors described in the Expenses 
section, will remain substantial. Deficits will persist over the next several years 
regardless of continued financial vigilance. Thus the Finance Committee expects free 
cash to be spent down to minimum prudent levels by FY01, barring any material 
change in circumstances. Other Town resources such as the stabilization fund will 
also have been depleted. 

Budget cuts never come easily. The Finance Committee wishes to thank the DPW, 
Town Offices, the Library and the schools for cooperating in this difficult process. A 
special note of appreciation is due the Executive Secretary, the School Committee 
Negotiating Team and their counterparts from Town and school employee bargaining 
units who concluded the recent contract negotiations so successfully. 



Long Range Planning 



After the spring 1996 Town Meeting, the Moderator, Jack French, appointed a Capital 
Planning Committee to address current and future capital needs of Lincoln. Members 
of this body include one representative each from the Selectboard, the Schools, the 
Finance Committee, and the Library. There are also two representatives from the 
Town at large. The Executive Secretary and the Finance Director are ex-officio 
members. 

The Capital Planning Committee was asked to consider future expenditures on any 
tangible assets with a useful life of at least five years and valued at $15,000 or more. 
Using a recent inventory of Town assets that included an evaluation of their condition 
and a recommended maintenance schedule, Town agencies each submitted a 
prioritized list of capital needs. This list included planning studies and design services 
for projects that will result in a request for future funding in excess of $15,000. 

The Committee met with the various boards to discuss their requests for capital 
expenditures and then prepared a capital spending plan for FY98 through FY02. 
Subsequent meetings were required to accommodate the needs of the Public Safety 
Building Committee and the changing financial projections provided by the Finance 
Committee. Following its deliberations, the Capital Planning Committee initially 
recommended a FY98 capital budget of about $1 .1 million. At the urging of the FinCom 
this was reduced to $992,000. Their full report appears in the Town Report. 

To keep the Town's expenditures in line with projected revenues, however, the Finance 
Committee recommends to the Town a smaller capital budget of $920,000. To reach 
this level, several warrants have either been withdrawn or reduced by sponsoring 
agencies. 



General Government 



FY96 FY97 FY98 FY97/FY98 

Actual Budget Proposed Change 

$981 $1,211 $1,185 -2.1% 



General Information 

General Government includes: Selectboard, Finance Committee, Town Offices, 
Legal Services, Conservation Commission, Assessors, Town Clerk, Town 
Building Maintenance, Consulting, Elections and Registration, Planning Board, 
Board of Appeals, Town Report, and Reserve Fund. The Town Office accounts 
include personnel costs and administrative and financial department expenses. 

NOTE: This year the following accounts were relocated to different 
departments: Town Engineer and Tree Warden to Public Works, Land 
Management to Culture and Recreation. As noted above, the following 
accounts were transferred to General Government from other accounts or 
departments: Town Report (Expense) and Reserve Fund from Unclassified. 

Key Issues 

• There has been an overall decline in expenses despite increases in legal and data 
processing department costs, largely as a result of significant reductions in the 
Town Offices Personnel accounts. 



Warrant Articles 

#10 Roadside Path $140,000 Construct Bedford roadside path. 

#1 1 Roadside Path $100,000 Petition article to extend 117 roadside path. 

#13 Computers $171 ,000 Continued upgrade of Town system. 

#30 Conservation Truck $ 20,000 Replace old/inadequate electric vehicle. 

#31 Pierce Park $ 15,000 Drainage improvements. 

#32 Postage Machine $ 6,500 Replace Town Office postage machine. 

#33 Town Bldg. Maint. $ 71,915 Preventative maintenance and repairs. 



10 





Public Safety 




FY96 
Actual 


FY97 FY98 
Budaet Proposed 


FY97/FY98 
Chanae 


$1,607 


$1,682 $1,773 


5.4% 



General Information 

Public Safety includes Building Inspection, the Department of Weights and 
Measures, and the dispatch and delivery of police, fire, and emergency medical 
services. 



Key Issues 

• The budget increase requested is due, in part, to anticipated overtime for: the 
juvenile officer, additional traffic patrol, training mandated by the State, and escort 
of prisoners to out-of-town lock-up facilities during building construction. The cost 
of additional traffic patrols will be partially offset by revenues collected in fines. 

• Maintenance and repair expenses will continue at an elevated level until older 
vehicles are replaced. The ambulance was replaced in FY97, but other vehicles 
have exceeded their expected useful life of 20 years. 

• The purchase of two police cruisers is proposed under Warrant Article #15, as 
part of our standard replacement program. 

• The upgrade of radio equipment and the construction of a tower and antenna for 
the new public safety building is requested under Warrant Article #19. 

• A 4 x 4 pick-up truck with water tank is requested under Warrant Article #16. This 
vehicle would provide off-road access for brush fires or emergency rescue and 
would be used instead of a fire engine for routine Fire Department inspections. 



Warrant Articles 

#15 Police Cruisers $52,000 Scheduled replacement . 

#16 Pick-up Truck w/Tank $15,000 For off-road access in emergencies. 

#1 9 Radio Tower & Antenna $35,000 For the new public safety building. 



11 



Elementary Schools 



FY96 FY97 FY98 FY97/FY98 

Actual Budget Proposed Change 

$4,669 $4,907 $5,208 6.1% 



General Information 

The elementary schools encompass kindergarten through the eighth grade on 
two campuses - the Lincoln Schools campus and the Hanscom Air Force Base 
campus. 

Enrollment in the Lincoln Schools totals 624. The new school facility has been in 
operation since the beginning of the current school year. There have been 
additional costs of operation for the larger campus such as utility and custodial 
fees. 

At the Hanscom campus, the total student enrollment is 617. The Lincoln School 
Committee has been awarded the contract to operate the Hanscom campus for 
the next five years, the cost of which is fully funded by the federal government. 



Key Issues 

Several fundamental factors are creating pressure to increase the budget beyond 
the 3% guideline established by the Finance Committee: 

• Increased enrollment over previous years is a result of growth in the Town's 
school-age population and the retention of students at the Brooks School. 
Enrollment grew by 66 students this year and is projected to increase by 14 next 
year. As a result, the school system has had to add faculty to maintain the class 
size policy established by the School Committee. 

• The new, larger Lincoln school building requires more heat, light, and telephone 
service. Utility costs have risen $58,000, an increase of 25%. 

• As the general enrollment of the schools has increased, so too has the enrollment 
in special needs. Currently there are 116 students receiving services compared 
to 107 students last year, an increase of 8.4%. The goal of our program is to 
educate Lincoln's special needs children on campus, which is better for the 
children and more cost effective for the Town. Because of the high per pupil cost, 
additions to SPED enrollment have a major impact on the budget. 



12 



Warrant Articles 

# 8 Educational Reform $224,505 

#24 Smith Lighting $ 22,000 
#25 Oil Tanks Replacement $ 70,000 

#26 Brooks Bathrooms $ 17,000 

#27 Brooks Fieldhouse $ 10,000 

#28 Smith Room #125 $ 13,000 



Pass-through of state funds. 
Parking lot lighting. 
Replace tanks & furnaces. 
Upgrade Brooks bathrooms. 
Design roof replacement. 
Renovate room 125. 



The FinCom does not support passage of Article #24. 



13 



Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 



FY96 FY97 FY98 FY97/FY98 

Actual Budget Proposed Change 

LSRHS $10,561 $11,364 $11,926 4.9% 

Lincoln Assessment $ 1,201 $ 1,338 $ 1,482 10.8% 



General Information 

The LSRHS student population comes from both Lincoln and Sudbury. Projected 
enrollment for FY98 is 1,084 students, 85% from Sudbury and 15% from Lincoln. 
Current enrollment in both towns' elementary schools indicates that the proportion 
of Lincoln students at LSRHS will continue to increase over the next several 
years. 

Regional school district budgets carry expenses normally included in the Town's 
operating budget for non-regional schools. Typically these costs are the school's 
debt service payments and employee benefits such as pensions, workers' 
compensation, and health and liability insurance. Capital equipment that could be 
submitted to the towns as warrant articles may also be included. 

The Rogers Theater renovation project ($1.95 million), approved by Lincoln voters 
in 1994, is still pending approval by the Town of Sudbury. 



Key Issues 

• Enrollment is projected to increase by 119 students (12%) next year. Lincoln's 
proportion of students is expected to rise from this year's 14% to 15%, thereby 
increasing Lincoln's share of the budget expenses in FY98. 

• The total FY98 budget increase of $562,073 (4.9%) provides level service for a 
larger student population. 

• The total FY98 assessment to be paid by the Towns is $9.85 million. Lincoln's 
share is $1.48, up $144,238 (10.8%). 

• Salaries comprise the major increase in the budget - up $597,254 (8.2%). The 
additional faculty (7.2 new positions) are needed to respond to larger enrollments 
and to meet standards mandated by the State. 

Warrant Articles None 



14 



Minuteman Science-Technology High School 



FY96 FY97 FY98 FY97/FY98 

Actual Budget Proposed Change 

Total $11,485 $11,859 $12,605 6.5% 

Lincoln Assessment $ 65 $ 107 $ 86 -19.6% 



General Information 

The Minuteman Science-Technology High School offers vocational-technical 
training in more than twenty-five different fields as well as a full college 
preparatory academic program. Minuteman-Tech is supported by sixteen 
member towns in the region and accepts "choice" students from many other 
communities. 



Key Issues 

• The decline in our assessment is attributable primarily to a decline in enrollment of 
Lincoln students. The FY98 amount is based upon an estimate of support funds 
to be provided by the State. The final amount will not be available until after this 
document has gone to press. 

• It is anticipated that there will be a significant increase in total enrollment from the 
region's schools. This will reduce the number of "choice" students who pay a 
significantly lower tuition than do those from the region's schools. This will have 
the effect of lowering per pupil assessments for member towns. 

• An attempt was made to have the legislature raise the payment for "choice" 
students to an amount closer to that paid for pupils from member towns. The 
effort failed, but it is anticipated that another attempt will be made in the upcoming 
session of the legislature. 



Warrant Articles None 



15 



Public Works & Facilities 



FY96 
Actual 



$888 



FY97 
Budget 



$1,015 



FY98 
Proposed 



$1,133 



FY97/FY98 
Change 



11.6% 



General Information 

Public Works & Facilities includes road and roadside maintenance, snow plowing, 
the operation of the transfer station, and other maintenance and support services 
for the Town, Engineering and Tree Warden. 

NOTE: This year, as noted previously, the following accounts were 
transferred from General Government: Town Engineer and Tree Warden. 



Key Issues 

• Excluding the increased charges for NESWC of $78,218 and the new out-sourced 
engineering expense of $26,780, the DPW budget increased by 3.0%. 
Elimination of the Town Engineer and obtaining engineering services from 
Concord and consulting engineers has resulted in substantial savings. 

• The Town is aggressively pursuing reductions in NESWC tipping fees. Failing 
that, we will terminate the agreement at the earliest possible date. 



Warrant Articles 

#14 Chapter 90 Approp. 
#20 Dump Truck 
#21 Fuel Tank Design 
#22 Transfer Station 
#23 Roof Replacement 



$217,173 Reimbursable from State highway fund. 

$ 80,000 Purchase a new dump truck. 

$ 15,000 Design replacement of tanks. 

$ 50,000 Design & construct improvements. 

$ 57,000 Replace public works roof. 



16 



Human Services 



BOH 
COA 
Other 


FY96 
Actual 


FY97 
Budqet 


FY98 
Proposed 


FY97/FY98 
Chanae 


$88 
$59 
$20 


$93 
$64 
$26 


$90 
$66 
$21 


-3.2% 

3.1% 

-19.2% 



General Information 

Human Services covers a broad range of programs provided by Lincoln to its 
citizens in order to promote their well-being. It includes the Board of Health 
(BOH), the Council on Aging (COA), Veteran's Services, the Housing 
Commission, and the Minuteman Home Care Membership. 



Key Issues 

• The reduction in the Board of Health budget is due primarily to certain health 
services now being provided under a contract with the Town of Concord. 



The Council on Aging budget growth is for salary increases only, 
items are identical to the FY97 budget. 



All other line 



Warrant Articles None. 






17 



Library 



FY96 FY97 FY98 FY97/FY98 

Actual Budget Proposed Change 

$472 $495 $516 4.1% 



General Information 

The Lincoln Public Library is open fifty-seven hours weekly offering regular library 
services and many special programs for children and adults. Its membership in 
the Minuteman Library Network opens to the Lincoln community an extensive 
array of books and recordings held by other member libraries. The Friends of the 
Lincoln Public Library, a volunteer organization, supports the Library by 
orchestrating special events and providing private funds to augment the budget. 

A State-mandated requirement that the Lincoln Public Library spend 19% of its 
annual budget on the purchase of books has recently been challenged 
unsuccessfully by our Librarian and the Library Trustees. They believe the book 
needs of our Town can be met with an expenditure of about $75,000, 
approximately 15% of the budget, not the $98,000 required by the State. Meeting 
the State requirement for books within the Library's current operating budget 
would require a serious reduction in staff time and open hours. 



Key Issues 

• The State may rescind certification of the Lincoln Town Library for failing to satisfy 
the requirement that we spend 19% of our annual budget on books. 

• Loss of certification may have two consequences: a) forfeiture of $13,000 in 
State Aid and b) potential loss of inter-library and reciprocal borrowing privileges. 

• The Library will continue to increase its book budget ($67,500 in FY98, up by 
21%) and will redouble its efforts to effect a change in State requirements. 

• Our Librarian and Trustees believe that we should not buy books at the expense 
of service to the Town (open hours), and they will continue to lobby for their 
position with State officials. 

Warrant Articles 

#29 Staff Work Area $15,000 Renovate staff work area. 



18 





Recreation 




FY96 
Actual 


FY97 
Budqet 


FY98 
Proposed 


FY97/FY98 
Chanae 


RD $195 
CC $ 16 


$218 

$ 19 


$222 

$ 19 


1 .7% 
2.7% 



General Information 

The Recreation Department provides numerous and diverse activities for Lincoln 
citizens of all ages and manages Town recreational facilities such as the tennis 
courts and the Codman Pool. It operates a Town summer camp and oversees 
the scheduling of facilities on the Lincoln School campus for after hours activities. 
Its paid staff is supervised by a full-time Director and a volunteer Recreation 
Committee. The Celebrations Committee produces the Fourth of July festivities, 
and sponsors outdoor concerts and other events. 

The Recreation Department is almost fully supported by user fees. Over the last 
five years, fees collected from program participants have accounted for between 
84% and 100% of its operating budgets. The annual net cost to the Town over 
this period has ranged from $697 to $28,468. The Department's recent move to 
the Lincoln School campus and the availability of new space provided by the 
School Building Project has permitted a significant expansion of recreational 
services and programs. The Celebrations Committee is also largely self- 
supporting. 



Key Issues 

• The Department is considering how best to use newly available facilities on the 
Lincoln school campus to expand its offerings to the Town. 

• Town playing fields are now being refurbished and expanded with a two year 
investment program. 

Warrant Articles 

#12 Ballfield Restoration and Maintenance $135,000 Phase 2 of 2 years. 



19 





Debt Service 




FY96 
Actual 


FY97 FY98 
Budaet Proposed 


FY97/FY98 

Chanae 


$1 ,446 


$1 ,799 $2,325 


29.2% 



General Information 

Debt service represents principal and interest payments on the Town's 
outstanding loan obligations. The increase for FY98 reflects debt incurred to fund 
the School Building and Public Safety Building projects approved by previous 
Town Meetings. The $2,325 million figure in the FY98 budget represents the 
peak in debt service on current bonding. 

Our debt service burden reflects payments not only for the recent School and 
Public Safety Building construction, but also for numerous other projects 
approved over the years by Lincoln citizens. Substantial payments on debt arising 
from the Flint's Field purchase and the Library renovation and expansion, for 
example, are still being made. Information on debt service obligations appears in 
the detailed budget at the end of this report. 

As indicated above, debt service reaches maximum levels in the proposed FY98 
budget and will remain at approximately the same level in FY99. At this point, 
completion of payments on the Library (FY98) and Flints' Fields purchase (FYOO) 
will begin to reduce this burden. 

As the State's share of the School Building project, Lincoln will receive $681 ,036 
per year over the life of the School construction bonds that will be applied to 
defray debt service expenses. Even with this reimbursement, however, debt 
service for the Town's numerous projects and purchases has a significant impact 
on the Town budget, and upon the tax rate through approved debt exclusions. 



20 



Pensions and Insurance 



FY96 FY97 FY98 FY97/FY98 

Actual Budget Proposed Change 

Middlesex County Pension $409 $439 $473 7.6% 

Health and Other Ins. $910 $986 $943 -4.4% 

Prop, and Indem. Ins. $105 $149 $150 0.7% 



General Information 

The Town is required by law to contribute annually to the Middlesex County 
Retirement Fund. Several health insurance plans are also offered by the Town to 
its employees. In addition, the Town provides unemployment and life insurance 
and makes employee-related FICA payments. The Town's share of contributions 
to these programs and benefits is determined by federal and state law, personnel 
by-laws and/or contract negotiations with the Town's unions. Property and 
Indemnity Insurance includes workers' compensation, liability insurance, and the 
bonding of appropriate Town officials. 



Key Issues 

• Restructuring of employee health insurance plans approved in recent collective 
bargaining may bring further reductions in insurance costs. 



21 



Water Department 



FY96 
Actual 



$316 



FY97 

Budget 



FY98 
Proposed 



$382 



$400 



FY97/FY98 
Change 



4.8% 



General Information 

The Water Department operating budget is funded through water fees. Surplus 
from operations is used to reduce debt incurred to construct the contact chamber. 
The FY96 surplus of $475,000 will reduce the principal balance of debt from 
$733,000 to $258,000. This reduction is proposed under Warrant Article #9. 



Key Issues 



The Water Department will continue to place a high priority on adequate staffing 
and training in order to maintain the Town's waiver of the State's filtration 
requirement. 



: 






Warrant Articles 

#9 Debt Payment 



$475,000 Reduce debt from $733,000 to $258,000. 



22 



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23 



TABLE 4 

FISCAL DETAIL 

FY96 - FY98 

EXPENDITURES 
1995-1996 



BUDGET 
1996-1997 






PROPOSED 
1997-1998 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



1220 



SELECTMEN 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 1290 



300.00 
1,661.83 
1,961.83 



1,961.83 



400.00 
2,080.00 
2,480.00 



2,480.00 



400.00 
2,080.00 
2,480.00 



2,480.00 



1290 



TOWN OFFICES 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 1290 



591,788.37 
114,362.69 
706,151.06 

706,151.06 



604,451.00 

114,175.00 

718,626.00 

2,500.00 

721,126.00 



558,477.00 
137,711.00 
696,188.00 

696,188.00 



1310 FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Expense 
TOTAL 1310 



135.00 



135.00 



150.00 



150.00 



150.00 



150.00 



1320 RESERVE FUND 

Reserve Fund Appropriation 

TOTAL 1320 

1370 ASSESSORS 

Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 1370 

1510 LAW DEPARTMENT 
Expense 
TOTAL 1510 



- 


250,000.00 
250,000.00 


225,000.00 


- 


225,000.00 


46,908.19 


49,559.00 


53,624.00 


55,552.19 


15,750.00 


13,996.00 


102,460.38 


65,309.00 


67,620.00 




350.00 
65,659.00 


- 


102,460.38 


67,620.00 


80,096.41 


72,000.00 


80,000.00 


80,096.41 


72,000.00 


80,000.00 



24 







EXPENDITURES 


BUDGET 


PROPOSED 




TOWN CLERK 


1995-1996 


1996-1997 


1997-1998 


1610 










Personal Services 


500.00 


500.00 


500.00 




Expense 


1,500.00 


2,350.00 


2,350.00 




SUB-TOTAL 


2,000.00 


2,850.00 


2,850.00 




Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 1610 


- 


- 


- 




2,000.00 


2,850.00 


2,850.00 


1620 


REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 










Personal Services 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 




Expense 


2,963.30 


5,000.00 


4,800.00 




TOTAL 1620 


3,163.30 


5,200.00 


5,000.00 


1710 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 










Personal Services 


35,776.00 


38,127.00 


40,466.00 




Expense 


5,104.51 


7,700.00 


7,700.00 




SUB-TOTAL 


40,880.51 


45,827.00 


48,166.00 




Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 1710 


- 


- 


- 




40,880.51 


45,827.00 


48,166.00 


1750 


PLANNING BOARD 










Expense 


2,310.71 


4,950.00 


5,098.00 




SUB-TOTAL 


2,310.71 


4,950.00 


5,098.00 




Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 1750 


- 


- 


- 




2,310.71 


4,950.00 


5,098.00 


1760 


BOARD OF APPEALS 










Expense 


1,080.00 


1,000.00 


1,080.00 




TOTAL 1760 


1,080.00 


1,000.00 


1,080.00 


1950 


TOWN REPORT 










Expense 


9,566.13 


10,325.00 


11,500.00 




TOTAL 1950 


9,566.13 


10,325.00 


11,500.00 


1990 


TOWN BUILDINGS 










Expense 


30,903.96 


28,950.00 


39,750.00 




SUB-TOTAL 


30,903.96 


28,950.00 


39,750.00 




Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 1990 


- 


- 


- 




30,903.96 


28,950.00 


39,750.00 



25 



EXPENDITURES BUDGET PROPOSED 

1995-1996 1996-1997 1997-1998 



TOTALS FOR GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
PUBLIC SAFETY 

2110 POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 21 10 

2210 FIRE DEPARTMENT 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 2210 

2310 AMBULANCE SERVICE 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 2310 

2440 SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 
Expense 

TOTAL 2440 

2490 BUILDING DEPARTMENT 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 2490 



980,709.29 1,210,517.00 1,184,882.00 



620,246.11 

33,697.03 

653,943.14 

653,943.14 



603,642.85 

96,770.76 

700,413.61 

700,413.61 



16,846.80 

7,075.00 

23,921.80 

23,921.80 

150.00 
150.00 



71,589.23 

2,574.00 

74,163.23 

74,163.23 



657,867.00 

29,855.00 

687,722.00 

75.00 

687,797.00 



612,623.00 

88,100.00 

700,723.00 

5,600.00 

706,323.00 



17,300.00 
9,450.00 

26,750.00 
1,500.00 

28,250.00 



150.00 
150.00 



75,762.00 

2,625.00 

78,387.00 

78,387.00 



681,551.001 

33,750.00 

715,301.00* 

2,200.00, 



717,501.00 



643,309.00 

92,550.00 

735,859.00 

3,350.00 



739,209.00 



18,300.00 
9,250.00 

27,550.00 
1,800.00 



29,350.00 



150.00 



150.00 



79,633.00 

2,550.00 

82,183.00 



82,183.00 



26 



2510 COMMUNICATIONS CENTER 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 2510 

2910 CIVIL DEFENSE 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 2910 

2920 DOG OFFICER 
Expense 
TOTAL 2910 

2990 PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 2990 

TOTALS FOR PUBLIC SAFETY 

EDUCATION 

3100 LOCAL SCHOOL SYSTEM 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 3100 



EXPENDITURES BUDGET PROPOSED 

1995-1996 1996-1997 1997-1998 



121,731.18 


137,436.00 


149,455.00 


10,488.93 


14,800.00 


13,725.00 


132,220.11 


152,236.00 


163,180.00 


- 


300.00 
152,536.00 


- 


132,220.11 


163,180.00 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 


474.82 


500.00 


521.00 


674.82 


700.00 


721.00 


- 


- 


- 



674.82 



5,321.50 



700.00 



5,700.00 



721.00 



5,700.00 



5,321.50 



15,957.18 
15,957.18 



5,700.00 



21,834.00 
21,834.00 



5,700.00 



34,775.00 
34,775.00 



15,957.18 21,834.00 34,775.00 

1 ,606,765.39 1 ,681 ,677.00 1 ,772,769.00 



4,668,737.00 4,906,527.54 5,208,338.00 



3310 LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Regional School District Assessment 1,201,420.71 1,338,197.72 1,482,435.91 

TOTAL 3310 1,201,420.71 1,338,197.72 1,482,435.91 



27 



EXPENDITURES BUDGET PROPOSED 

1995-1996 1996-1997 1997-1998 

3320 MINUTEMAN REG VOC TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

Regional School District Assessment 65,289.00 106,508.00 85,810.00 

TOTAL 3320 65,289.00 106,508.00 85,810.00 



TOTALS FOR EDUCATION 



5,935,446.71 6,351 ,233.26 6,776,583.91 



PUBLIC WORKS & FACILITIES 



4110 ENGINEERING & CONSULTING 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 4110 

4220 DPW OPERATION & MAINTENANCE 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 4220 

4230 DPW SNOW & ICE CONTROL 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 4230 

4240 STREET LIGHTING 
Expense 

TOTAL 4240 

4270 TREE WARDEN 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 4270 



25,000.00 
25,000.00 



51,780.00 
51,780.00 



- 


25,000.00 


51,780.00 


407,762.04 


431,068.00 


444.843.0C 


129,702.55 


150,200.00 


155.300.0C 


537,464.59 


581,268.00 


600,143.00 


537,464.59 


581,268.00 


600,143.00 


35,000.00 


39,500.00 


43,750.00 


35,000.00 


35,500.00 


33,500.00 


70,000.00 


75,000.00 


77,250.00 


70,000.00 


75,000.00 


77,250.00 


31,542.74 


32,000.00 


22,000.00 


31,542.74 


32,000.00 


22,000.00 


2,500.00 


3,000.00 


3,500.00 


2,500.00 


3,000.00 


3,500.00 


- 


- 


- 



2,500.00 



3,000.00 



3.500.00 



28 



EXPENDITURES BUDGET PROPOSED 

1995-1996 1996-1997 1997-1998 



4290 DPW BUILDING 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 4290 

4330 RUBBISH REMOVAL 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 4330 

4340 TRANSFER STATION 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 4340 

4910 CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 
Personal Services 

^ Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 4910 

TOTALS FOR PUBLIC WORKS & FACILITIES 



15,966.06 


15,650.00 


15,900.00 


15,966.06 


15,650.00 


15,900.00 


15,966.06 


15,650.00 


15,900.00 


6,310.17 


7,325.00 


7,545.00 


6,310.17 


7,325.00 


7,545.00 


6,310.17 


7,325.00 


7,545.00 
4,518.00 


208,033.75 


257,700.00 


331,400.00 


208,033.75 


257,700.00 


335,918.00 


208,033.75 


257,700.00 


335,918.00 


1,855.29 


2,050.00 


2,050.00 


14,180.43 


16,478.00 


16,860.00 


16,035.72 


18,528.00 


18,910.00 


16,035.72 


18,528.00 


18,910.00 


I 887,853.03 


1,015,471.00 


1,132,946.00 



HUMAN SERVICES 



5110 BOARD OF HEALTH 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 51 10 



74,935.82 
13,235.25 
88,171.07 

88,171.07 



77,337.00 
15,470.00 
92,807.00 

92,807.00 



74,300.00 
15,220.00 
89,520.00 

89,520.00 



29 



EXPENDITURES BUDGET PROPOSED 

1995-1996 1996-1997 1997-1998 



5220 


MINUTEMAN HOME CARE 










Expense 


862.00 


885.00 


908.00 




TOTAL 5220 


862.00 


885.00 


908.00 


5410 


COUNCIL ON AGING 










Personal Services 


59,379.03 


54,810.00 


58,166.00 




Expense 


- 


8,620.00 


8,620.00 




SUB-TOTAL 


59,379.03 


63,430.00 


66,786.00 




Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 5410 


- 


1,000.00 
64,430.00 


- 




59,379.03 


66,786.00 


5430 


VETERANS' SERVICES 










Expense 


7,246.17 


13,000.00 


8,000.00 




TOTAL 5430 


7,246.17 


13,000.00 


8,000.00 


5910 


HOUSING COMMISSION 










Expense 


10,900.00 


10,900.00 


11,225.00 




TOTAL 5910 


10,900.00 


10,900.00 


11,225.00 


5960 


CODMAN COMPLEX 










Expense 


600.00 


600.00 


600.00 




TOTAL 5960 


600.00 


600.00 


600.00 


TOTALS FOR HUMAN SERVICES 


167,158.27 


182,622.00 


177,039.00 



CULTURE & RECREATION 



6110 LIBRARY 

Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 61 10 



354,038.02 

82,110.00 

436,148.02 

436,148.02 



372,797.00 

84,755.00 

457,552.00 

457,552.00 



378,421.00 

98,680.00 

477,101.00 

477,101.00 



30 







EXPENDITURES 


BUDGET 


PROPOSED 


6120 


LIBRARY BUILDING 


1995-1996 


1996-1997 


1997-1998 










Expense 


36,200.00 


37,150.00 


38,450.00 




SUB-TOTAL 


36,200.00 


37,150.00 


38,450.00 




Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 6120 


- 


250.00 
37,400.00 


250.00 


36,200.00 


38,700.00 


6310 


RECREATION DEPARTMENT 










Personal Services 


152,153.02 


164,074.00 


166,977.00 




Expense 


43,283.61 


53,820.00 


54,675.00 




SUB-TOTAL 


195,436.63 


217,894.00 


221,652.00 




Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 6310 


- 


- 


- 


195,436.63 


217,894.00 


221,652.00 


6510 


CONSERVATION LAND 










Personal Services 


60,708.69 


64,904.00 


67,144.00 




Expense 


7,746.65 


9,205.00 


9,205.00 




SUB-TOTAL 


68,455.34 


74,109.00 


76,349.00 




Capital Outlay 


489.45 


500.00 


500.00 




TOTAL 6510 


68,944.79 


74,609.00 


76,849.00 


6610 


CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 










Expense 


16,139.35 


18,600.00 


19,100.00 




TOTAL 6610 


16,139.35 


18,600.00 


19,100.00 


TOTALS FOR CULTURE & RECREATION 


752,868.79 


806,055.00 


833,402.00 



DEBT SERVICE 



7110 SCHOOL ROOF 1988 

Principal Long-Term Debt 
Interest Long-Term Debt 
TOTAL 71 10 



60,000.00 
8,160.00 

68,160.00 



60,000.00 
4,710.00 

64,710.00 



20,000.00 
1,200.00 

21,200.00 



71 20 SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION 1 996 
Principal Long-Term Debt 
Interest Long-Term debt 

TOTAL 7120 



34,000.00 



34,000.00 



34,000.00 
276,877.00 



742,000.00 
573,669.00 



310,877.00 1,315,669.00 



31 







EXPENDITURES 


BUDGET 


PROPOSED 




MCHUGH CONSERVATION LAND 


1995-1996 


1996-1997 


1997-1998 


7210 


1988 








Principal Long-Term Debt 


70,000.00 


80,000.00 


30,000.00 




Interest Long-Term debt 


10,505.00 


6,480.00 


1,800.00 




TOTAL 7210 


80,505.00 


86,480.00 


31,800.00 


7220 


FLINTS FIELDS 1989 










Principal Long-Term Debt 


242,000.00 


242,000.00 


242,000.00 




Interest Long-Term Debt 


69,333.00 


54,087.00 


38,720.00 




TOTAL 7220 


311,333.00 


296,087.00 


280,720.00 


7320 


LIBRARY ADDITION 1988 










Principal Long-Term Debt 


220,000.00 


203,000.00 


200,000.00 




Interest Long-Term Debt 


36,525.50 


23,876.00 


12,000.00 




TOTAL 7320 


256,525.50 


226,876.00 


212,000.00 


7330 


LIBRARY RENOVATIONS 1988 










Principal Long-Term Debt 


30,000.00 


27,000.00 


- 




Interest Long-Term Debt 
TOTAL 7330 


3,304.50 
33,304.50 


1,580.00 
28,580.00 


- 




- 


7340 


PUBLIC SAFETY BLDG 1996 










Principal Long-Term Debt 


- 


- 


200,000.00 




Interest Long-Term Debt 
TOTAL 7340 


- 


58,750.00 
58,750.00 


115,528.00 




- 


315,528.00 


7410 


TRANSFER STATION 1989 










Principal Long-Term Debt 


48,000.00 


48,000.00 


48,000.00 




Interest Long-Term Debt 


13,752.00 


10,728.00 


7,680.00 




TOTAL 7410 


61,752.00 


58,728.00 


55,680.00 


7420 


LANDFILL CLOSURE 1989 










Principal Long-Term Debt 


75,000.00 


75,000.00 


75,000.00 




Interest Long-Term Debt 


21,487.50 


16,763.00 


12,000.00 



TOTAL 7420 96,487.50 91,763.00 87,000.00 

791 INTEREST SHORT-TERM DEBT 

Interest Short-Term Debt 482,284.83 576,000.00 5,000.00 

TOTAL 7910 482,284.83 576,000.00 5,000.00 



32 



EXPENDITURES BUDGET PROPOSED 

1995-1996 1996-1997 1997-1998 



TOTALS FOR DEBT SERVICE 



1,445,502.33 1,798,851.00 2,324,597.00 



UNCLASSIFIED 



INSURANCE 

91 1 COUNTY RETIREMENT ASSESSMEN 

Expense 

TOTAL 9110 



409,200.00 
409,200.00 



439,283.00 
439,283.00 



472,754.00 
472,754.00 



9130 UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE 
Expense 
TOTAL 9130 



8,550.62 



8,550.62 



18,000.00 
18,000.00 



15,000.00 
15,000.00 



9140 HEALTH INSURANCE 
Expense 
TOTAL 9140 



782,549.65 
782,549.65 



860,000.00 
860,000.00 



793,000.00 
793,000.00 



9150 LIFE INSURANCE 
Expense 

TOTAL 9150 



8,000.00 



8,000.00 



8,000.00 



8,000.00 



10,000.00 
10,000.00 



9160 FICA/MEDICARE 
Expense 

TOTAL 9160 



110,958.69 
110,958.69 



100,000.00 
100,000.00 



125,000.00 
125,000.00 



9420 GENERAL INSURANCE 
Expense 

TOTAL 9420 



105,384.00 148,900.00 150,000.00 

105,384.00 148,900.00 150,000.00 



TOTALS FOR UNCLASSIFIED 



1 ,424,642.96 1 ,574,1 83.00 1 ,565,754.00 



TOTALS FOR GENERAL FUND 



1 3,200,946.77 1 4,620,609.26 1 5,767,972.91 






33 



WATER ENTERPRISE FUND 

4510 WATER DEPARTMENT 
Personal Services 
Expense 
SUB-TOTAL 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 4510 

4520 DEBT DISINFECTION FACILITY 
Interest on Short-Term Debt 

TOTAL 4520 

TOTALS FOR WATER ENTERPRISE FUND 

APPROPRIATION SUMMARY - 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

EDUCATION 

PUBLIC WORKS & FACILITIES 

HUMAN SERVICES 

CULTURE & RECREATION 

DEBT SERVICE 

UNCLASSIFIED 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

TOTAL - ARTICLE 5 



EXPENDITURES 


BUDGET 


PROPOSED 


1995-1996 


1996-1997 


1997-1998 


148,566.77 


180,950.00 


195,607.0(1 


128,484.06 


164,450.00 


175,400.0(1 
371,007.0(4 


277,050.83 


345,400.00 


277,050.83 


345,400.00 


371,007.00 


39,000.00 


36,453.00 
36,453.00 


29,303.00 


39,000.00 


29,303.00 


316,050.83 


381,853.00 


400,310.00 


980,709.29 


1,210,517.00 


1,184,882.00 


1,606,765.39 


1,681,677.00 


1,772,769.00 


5,935,446.71 


6,351,233.26 


6,776,583.91 


887,853.03 


1,015,471.00 


1,132,946.00 


167,158.27 


182,622.00 


177,039.00 


752,868.79 


806,055.00 


833,402.00 


1,445,502.33 


1,798,851.00 


2,324,597.00 


1,424,642.96 


1,574,183.00 


1,565,754.00 


316,050.83 


381,853.00 
15,002,462.26 


400,310.00 


13,516,997.60 


16,168,282.91 


34 




. 



WARRANT 

1997 NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify the legal voters of 
said Town of Lincoln qualified to vote in Town Meeting for the transaction of Town 
Affairs to meet in the Donaldson Auditorium in said Lincoln on Saturday, the fifth day of 
April next, at 9:30 a.m., then and there to act on the following articles, except Article 1, 
and also to meet at the Smith School Gymnasium on Monday, the thirty-first day of 
March next, at 7:30 a.m., then and there to act on the following Article 1, by posting a 
copy of this Warrant, by you attested, in said Town, seven days at least before the 
thirty-first day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Monday, March thirty-first, will be opened at 
7:30 a.m. and will be closed at 8:00 p.m. 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in their votes for one or more members for each of the following 
offices; 

Town Clerk for one year 

Selectmen for three years 

Treasurer for one year 

Assessor for three years 

School Committee member for three years 

Water Commissioner for three years 

Board of Health member for three years 

Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

Planning Board member for five years 

Planning Board member for one year 

Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years 

Commissioner of Trust Funds for two years 

Trustee of Bemis Fund for three years 

Trustee of Bemis Fund for one year 

DeCordova & Dana Museum and Park Trustee for four years 

Housing Commission member for three years 

Housing Commission member for two years 

Recreation Committee member for three years 

Regional School Committee (2) for three years 



35 



ARTICLE 2: To bring in their votes for any Committees, Commissioners, Trustees, and 
other officers required by law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 3: To hear and act upon the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, 
Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 4.: To fix the salaries and compensation of the several elective officers of th 
Town and to determine whether any Department, Board or Committee shall bei 
authorized to employ for additional compensation any of its members and to fix* 
additional compensation of such members. 



Selectmen 



ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and expedient* 
purposes of the Town, or take any other action relative thereto. 



Finance Committee 






ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to continue the Town's annual contract with the Secretary of* 
Defense to operate the elementary school at Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford 
Massachusetts, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee, Selectmen 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning By-laws with respect ta 
lot coverage requirements by deleting the current text of Section 13.3, which 
reads as follows: 



- 



"13.3 Lot Coverage. The total area of the enclosed space and all buildings 
any lot shall not exceed twenty-five (25) percent of the area of the lot." 

and substituting the following: 

"13.3 Lot Coverage. 

13.3.1 For the R-1 District, the Gross Floor Area of all floor(s) ot 
building(s) or structure(s) shall not exceed the greater of: 



36 



(a) Eight percent (8%) of the area of the lot, or 

(b) 2500 square feet. 

13.3.2 For all other zoning districts, the Gross Floor Area of all floor(s) of 
building(s) or structure(s) shall not exceed twenty-five percent 
(25%) of the lot area." 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, 
distinct from that authorized under Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1997 Annual 
Town Meeting, to provide educational program enhancement consistent with the 
intent of the State Education Reform Act as determined by the School 
Committee, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to further alter the sources of funding for the 
construction of a CT disinfection facility for Flint's Pond water supply, 
authorization for which construction and funding was previously given by vote 
adopted under Article 1 of the Warrant for the March 27, 1993 Special Town 
Meeting, and subsequently amended by votes adopted under Article 30 of the 
Warrant for the 1994 Annual Town Meeting, Article 29 of the Warrant for the 
1995 Annual Town Meeting, and Article 23 of the Warrant for the 1996 Annual 
Town Meeting, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, for the construction of a new roadside path on Bedford Road between 
Route 2 and Route 2A, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or any combination 
thereof to extend the current roadside path on Rt. 117 on the south side from 
Rt. 126 to the Mt. Misery parking lot, or take any other action relative thereto. 

By Petition 



37 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, to continue the program initiated at the 1996 Annual Town Meeting for 
the design, engineering, construction and/or reconstruction, and maintenance 
the Town's playing fields, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Recreation Committee 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, for the purchase of new computer equipment for Town departments 
including hardware, software, installation, training, maintenance and other 
related costs, or take any other action relative thereto. 



Selectmen 






ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, to be used for the construction, reconstruction, and/or maintenance and 
repair of roads and bridges, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combinati 
thereof, to be used by the public safety department for the replacement 
vehicles and/or equipment, and to see if the Town will authorize the disposal by 
sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment, or take any other action - 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money b; 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, to be used by the public safety department for the purchase of a new 
vehicle and/or equipment, or take any other action relative thereto. 



Selectmen 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning By-laws by (a 
establishing a new Overlay District under Section 12, entitled "Wireles 
Communications Facilities Overlay District", for the purpose of allowing, subject 
to certain stated conditions, the siting, erection, installation and use of certain? 



38 



equipment and fixtures used by a public utility or an FCC-licensed commercial 
entity for the wireless transmission and receipt of radio signals, in order to 
regulate the location and use of such facilities consistent with the requirements 
of the Federal Telecommunications Act of 1996, (b) designating on the Zoning 
Map those properties to be included in such new Overlay District, which are 
tentatively proposed by the Planning Board to include the parcels located on the 
Assessors' Map by the following Map and Parcel Descriptions: 5-9, 14-16, 18-6, 
19-4, 39-6, 44-2, 45-11, 48-7, 55-1.01, 55-1.02, 55-5, 96-2, and 103-6, and (c) 
making any necessary conforming changes to other sections of the Zoning By- 
law, the text of which proposed By-law amendments (including proposed Zoning 
Map designations) are available for inspection at the office of the Town Clerk, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to issue 
a request for proposals and subsequently to enter into negotiations with a 
wireless telecommunications carrier or carriers for the lease of Town land or 
buildings, or portions thereof, for cellular phone communications facilities and 
purposes, and to further authorize the Board of Selectmen, in its discretion, to 
enter into such lease or leases of Town-owned properties for the foregoing 
purposes containing such terms and conditions as the Board shall deem 
appropriate, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, for the acquisition of new police and fire dispatch computer and 
communications equipment and the installation of a replacement antenna tower 
at the public safety complex, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, to be used by the public works departments for the purchase of a new 
vehicle and/or equipment, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



39 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by if 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, for design and engineering services related to the future removal and 
replacement of the underground fuel tank at the public works garage, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 



Selectmen 






ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, to be used by the public works department for the redesign and 
reorganization of the transfer station site, including costs of engineering and 
construction or reconstruction, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, for the replacement of the roof on the public works garage, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



B 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, for the installation of site lighting in the Smith School parking lot, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 



Ej 



School Committee 






ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combinationcj 
thereof, to be used for the design, removal and replacement of oil tanks and 
furnaces in the Hartwell School pods, or take any other action relative thereto. 



School Committee 



. 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 

taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combinational 
thereof, for the purpose of undertaking necessary remodeling and/or repairs to 
the : Brooks School bathrooms in order to improve access to handicapp 
persons, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 



40 



y ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, for design and engineering services in relation to an assessment of the 
Brooks School Fieldhouse roof, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, for the renovation of Smith School room 125, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

School Committee 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, for renovation of the staff work area in the Lincoln Library including 
design services and purchase of related equipment, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Library Trustees 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, to be used by the conservation department for the purchase of a 
replacement vehicle and/or equipment, and to see if the Town will authorize the 
disposal by sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, for repair of the Pierce Park drainage system, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ia| ARTlCLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, for the replacement of a postage machine and scale at the town offices, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



41 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or any combination 
thereof, for the repair and maintenance of all Town buildings, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a set of goals as filed with the Town 
Clerk in order to guide the actions of the Board of Selectmen, the Planning 
Board, and other Town officials in dealing with issues relating to the future use 
and development of Hanscom Field by the Massachusetts Port Authority; or 
take any other action relative thereto. 



By Petition 






ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money for planning 
consultants and legal counsel to protect the Town's interests in connection with 
the future use and development of Hanscom Field; or act in any other manner 
in relation thereto. 

By Petition 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to recommend that the Board of Selectmen 
present for approval by Town Meeting substantive agreements concerning plans 
for aviation and non-aviation development or changes relating to Hanscom Field 
and surrounding land owned by the Massachusetts Port Authority; determine 
the process for such approvals; advise the Board of Selectmen and the 
Planning Board in this matter; or act in any other manner in relation thereto. 



By Petition 



ARTICLE 37. To get an unequivocal clarification at the 1997 annual Town Meeting 
from Town Counsel and the 3 Selectmen that the State's and Lincoln's Town 
laws are binding on ALL Lincoln residents, INCLUDING Town Officers and the 
Town itself. Clarification to include a Town Counsel demonstration that in spite 
of having only 1 of 3 warrants for the December 10 th Special Town Meeting 
properly posted and although money was then appropriated for a prohibited use 
that the Selectmen were not bound by Lincoln's own bylaws or alternatively add 
language to Lincoln's General Bylaws and Lincoln's Zoning Bylaws saying that 
the Town of Lincoln and Lincoln's Town Officers are likewise bound by these 
Lincoln Bylaws. 

By Petition 



42 



l 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or 



the Board of Health to enter into an intermunicipal agreement with the Town of 
Concord in accordance with Chapter 40, Section 4A of the General Laws, in 
order to permit the Town of Concord, acting through its Health Division, to 
provide public health inspection services and related permitting, compliance and 
administrative services to the Town of Lincoln and its property owners and 
residents, and to provide for the obligations of the Town regarding payment or 
reimbursement for such services, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen/Board of Health 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 41, 



Section 108L of the General Laws in order to establish an educational career 
incentive pay program offering base salary increases to police officers based on 
the completion of additional relevant education, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote (a) to accept the provisions of the final 



paragraph of Chapter 59, Section 5 of the General Laws, in order to permit the 
Town, in its discretion, to increase annually the abatement granted pursuant to 
clause Seventeenth D of Chapter 59, Section 5 by an amount not to exceed the 
increase in the cost of living as determined by the Consumer Price Index for 
such year, and (b) to establish the amount of such annual increase in the 
abatement granted under said clause Seventeenth D at one hundred percent 
(100%) of the preceding year's increase in the cost of living as determined by 
the Consumer Price Index for such year, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Assessors 



ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 71 



Section 71 E of the General Laws, in order to authorize the School Committee to 
establish a revolving fund account in connection with the collection of fees for 
the use of school buildings by outside agencies, entities or private citizens 
pursuant to Chapter 71, Section 71 of the General Laws, and to thereby permit 
the School Committee to expend monies in such revolving account without 
further appropriation for expenses in making school property available for such 
use, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 



43 



ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XI. Miscellaneous of its 
general by laws, by amending Paragraph A. of section 3A, Public Way Access 
Permits , so that such paragraph A shall read substantially as follows: 

A. Purpose. It is the purpose of this By-law to provide for the review of public 
way access permit applications and to establish procedures for the 
predictable, timely and uniform review of such applications so as to ensure 
public safety. These procedures apply to public way access permit 
applications for: (1) new access to a public way; (2) physical modification 
to existing access to a public way; (3) use of new or existing access to 
serve the building or expansion of a facility or use that generates a 
substantial increase in or impacts traffic on a public way. Such procedures 
shall not be construed to apply to State numbered wavs according to 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 81. section 21 (new language is 
underlined). 






or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen/Planning Board 



ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to reallocate its required share of the 
Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School District budget in accordance 
with the regional agreement as permitted by Section 16B of Chapter 71 of the 
General Laws, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School Committee 



44 



rtJHereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings, thereon to the Town 
Clerk, at or before the time for the meeting aforesaid. Given under our hands 
this third day of March in the year of our Lord one-thousand nine-hundred 
ninety-seven. 



Rosamond P. Delori / 

JohnS. Kerr II 

Peter C. Sugar, Chairman 
SELECTMEN OF LINCOLN 



45 



Glossary, continued 



Local Revenue (Receipts) 

Local revenue or local receipts includes special fees and taxes other than real 
estate tax. By far the largest component of our local revenue is the Motor Vehicle 
Excise Tax, which represents more than 30% of local receipts. Other line items 
are penalties and interest on taxes and excise (20%), and various fees such as 
those for dog licenses (12.5%). 

New Growth 

Proposition 2 1 /2 allows the Town to increase its levy limit annually by an amount 
based on the value of new construction and other growth in the tax base that is not 
the result of revaluation. This provision allows the Town to respond to new growth 
that may result in additional municipal costs; for example, the construction of new 
housing may result in increased school enrollments and therefore higher education 
costs. New growth becomes part of the levy limit base, which increases at the rate 
of 2.5% each year. 

Override 

Proposition 2 1 /2 allows a town to assess taxes in excess of the annual 2.5% 
increase plus new growth by passing an override. When an override is passed, 
the levy limit for the year is increased by the amount of the override. This results 
in a permanent increase in the Town's levy limit. An override requires a majority 
vote of the Selectmen to be placed on a ballot. A majority vote of the electorate is 
needed for approval. 

Reserve Fund 

This is a fund, established by the annual Town Meeting, which is under the control 
of the Finance Committee and from which transfers may be made for unforeseen 
expenditures. The limit on the size of this fund is 5% of the tax levy of the current 
fiscal year. 

SFSB 

This refers to State Aid available to the Town through the State Facilities Siting 
Board (SFSB) as partial reimbursement for the capital and interest costs of our 
school construction project. The Town will receive SFSB payments over the next 
eleven years, the time remaining on the school construction debt. 

Stabilization Fund 

The stabilization fund is a reserve account which allows the Town to put aside 
money in anticipation of future expenses. This helps the Town limit its tax rate 
increases, even in years of extraordinary expenses. The Town may appropriate 
into this fund in any year an amount no more than 10% of the previous year's levy. 

Tax Rate 

The tax rate is the amount of tax charged by the Town expressed in terms of a unit 
of the tax base: for example, $13.90 per $1000 of the assessed valuation of 
taxable property.